Tag Archives: Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition

New York in June! Save the Date!

Global Gateways and Local Connections:

Cities, Agriculture, and the Future of Food Systems

Join us for the Joint 2012 Annual Meetings & Conference of the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society (AFHVS), Association for the Study of Food and Society (ASFS), & Society for Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (SAFN).

June 20 – 24, 2012

New York University and The New School and – New York City

As increasingly greater portions of the global population shifts towards urban environments, and cities position themselves as crucial hubs not only for food consumption, but also for its production and distribution, it becomes urgent for agriculture to reposition and reaffirm its strategic role in ensuring food security, access to governance, and acceptable livelihoods for all the actors involved. The theme of the conference highlights the need for more equitable and sustainable distribution of power and resources among various stakeholders, including those without a strong voice on the world’s stage, such as the urban and rural poor, farmers, and migrants. In line with the call for sustainable development and green economies at the core of the Rio +20 United Nations gathering, the conference offers an opportunity for scholars, students, activists, farmers, practitioners, and concerned citizens to come together and explore innovative solutions and alternative models for creative, culturally viable, and environmentally sound integration of urban and rural food systems.

New York University and The New School have been at the forefront of the research, methodologies, and pedagogies that have shaped Food Studies, and have explored creative venues of public engagement to establish vital connections and a constructive dialogue between academia, the local communities, and the larger debates at the national and global level. We welcome not only scholarly sessions, but also encourage activists, government staff, farmers, and practitioners in food and agricultural systems to participate. Organizations, businesses, agencies, and publishers may also participate as exhibitors.

The conference website will be available soon, with more information, registration, and online submission of abstracts.

Organizer and Local Arrangements:

Jennifer Berg, New York University, jennifer.berg@nyu.edu

Fabio Parasecoli, The New School, parasecf@newschool.edu

Although our organizations encourage a broad spectrum of topics at our conferences, we especially encourage papers, posters, panel sessions, roundtables, and workshops that speak directly to the theme. We welcome not only academic sessions, but also strongly encourage activists, government staff, and those with practical knowledge of food and agricultural systems to participate. We welcome submissions on all aspects of food, nutrition, and agriculture, including those related to:

Art, Media, & Literary Analyses

Innovation & Development

Culture & Cultural Geography

Environment & Climate Change

Agroecology & Conservation

Ethics & Philosophy

Food Safety & Risk

Gender & Ethnicity

Globalization

History

Inequality, Access, Security & Justice

Indigenous Knowledge, Cultural Heritage and Local Traditions

Local Food Systems

Pedagogy

Politics, Policies & Governance in National & Global Contexts

Trade and Legal Issues

Research Methods, Practices & Issues

Social Action & Social Movements

Sustainability

Science & Technologies

Tours (tentative)

New York City has historically been the crucible for culinary traditions all over the world, social and political experimentation, innovative practices and an extremely vibrant restaurant scene. Our tentative plans include the following half- and full -day tours:

# 7 train– Ride the iconic #7 train through Queens and experience the aromas and tastes of the most ethnically diverse county in the United States (full day)

Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture– Take an air conditioned bus to Westchester County for a full day private guided tour of the 80 acre farm and enjoy a Dan Barber created lunch (full day)

Coney Island and Brighton Beach– Ride the elevated BMT subway to Brighton Beach for a guided walking tour of “Little Odessa”, NYC’s largest Russian community.  Enjoy breakfast picnic on the beach and then a walk along the boardwalk to Coney Island for rides, amusements and Nathan’s Hot Dogs (full day)

Rediscovering Red Hook – Enjoy  a walking tour of Added Value, New York’s original “asphalt garden”  and then discussion and talk with founder, Ian Marvey.  We’ll have a shopping spree at the 52,000 square foot Fairway market and picnic on the docks overlooking the Statue of Liberty.  Return to Manhattan in the Water Taxi (full day)

East New York Farms and Community Gardens Take the subway out to the economically-challenged community of East New York, Brooklyn and visit the non-profit farm and neighboring community gardens ( half day afternoon)

Chocolate Tour– Join a chocolate historian on a subway ride out to Brooklyn to experience 3 varying chocolate producers: Mast brothers, Jo Mart and Tumbador- Chocolate tastings and demos (full day)

Williamsburg Hipster– This is not the Williamsburg your grandparents knew- Ride the short L train to Bedford Avenue and explore artisanal food production and retail marketing including cheese, chocolate, pickles and charcuterie (half day- afternoon)

Roof Top Farms– travel via subway to two significant urban farms:  Eagle Street in Greenpoint, Brooklyn and Brooklyn Grange in Long Island City, Queens- lunch and talk at Roberta’s (full day)

Brooklyn Composting– Join our very own ASFS President, and Master Composter Annie Hauck-Lawson for half day foray into urban composting (half day).

Central Park Foraging– Rise early for a morning forage through Central park and learn about the edible flora and fauna secretly tucked within Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux’s 843 acre masterpiece (half day morning)

New York Public Library– Enjoy a private guided tour with Rebecca Federman, director of the expansive Culinary Collection at the New York Public Library’s main research branch (half day- afternoon)

Metropolitan Museum of Art– Join an art historian for a half day tour of food-centered work in the world-renowned metropolitan Museum (half day afternoon)

Fermenting and Distilling in Brooklyn – Enjoy a Brooklyn day with liquid on your mind.  Visit several beer, wine, and spirits’ producers for talks, tastings and demos (full day)

Hunts Point Terminal Market– Ride a private bus to Hunts Point Terminal Market in the Bronx , the world’s largest wholesale market for a private tour through the 60 acre complex (half day)

Queens Farm Museum– Ride an air conditioned bus to the 47 acre non-profit Queens Farm Museum , the longest continuously farmed land in New York State (half day)

Governor’s Island – Take the ferry to a 172 acre island in the middle of New York Harbor between Manhattan and Brooklyn – Bicycle tour through the island, stopping at historical markers along the way –picnic lunch included (pending weekday availability – full day)

Taco Crawl in Sunset Park, Brooklyn– Take the subway to Sunset Park, New York- home to thousands of immigrants from Puebla, Mexico. Visit bodegas, tortillerias, and taco stands (half day)

posted by David Beriss

Leave a comment

Filed under Announcements, anthropology, Call for Papers, food policy, food security

Christine Wilson Student Award 2011

Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition
2011 Christine Wilson Student Paper Award

The Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (SAFN) is pleased to announce the 2011 Christine Wilson Award competition.

Each year we recognize outstanding undergraduate and graduate research papers in the memory of Christine Wilson- a pioneer in the field of nutritional anthropology, innovator in ethnographic research methodology and inspirational guide to members of the society.

We request the submission of original, single-authored research papers that have as their primary focus an anthropological approach to the study of nutrition, foods, foodways, food security, hunger or similar topics. We will also accept multi-authored papers if the submission is by the first author and the other authors are also students. Papers that present new empirical research designs, evaluate community nutrition intervention programs or propose new conceptual frameworks are especially welcome. (Literature reviews and co-authored papers are not eligible).

Eligibility is restricted to students (undergraduate or graduate) enrolled in the 2011-2012 academic year.  If not a current member of SAFN, applicants are requested to apply for membership along with their submission.   Winners and runners-up in two categories (undergraduate and graduate) will be recognized and presented with an award at the 2011 AAA meeting in Montreal, PQ Canada.

The text of papers should be no longer than 20-25 pages, double-spaced. Please delete identifying information and submit as attachment along with the CWA cover sheet to:

Michael R. McDonald, Ph.D.
Chair, CWA Awards Committee
Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition

Email to: mmcdonal@fgcu.edu.

Deadline: October 14, 2011

Leave a comment

Filed under AAA 2011 Montreal, Announcements, anthropology, awards, Christine Wilson, food policy, food security, nutrition, SAFN Member Research

Food and Agriculture Under the Big Sky

Another day, another opportunity to travel, present your research, meet interesting people…and have a few great meals with them.  This one is in Montana, a dramatically beautiful state.   More importantly, the Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition is a sponsor of this event.  Which is very nearly a guarantee of a good time!  Seriously: I have been to a few of these conferences and highly recommend them.  It is interdisciplinary, so you get to hear from and meet all sorts of people engaged in food studies, not just anthropologists.  It is big enough to be quite diverse, but small enough to facilitate great networking.  And there usually are some great opportunities to eat.  I have copied the main call for papers below.  Note that the deadline for submissions is coming up very soon: February 11, 2011. Do not hesitate, get your ideas together quickly.  Follow the links below for more information.

Announcing the Joint 2011 Annual Meetings of the

Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society (AFHVS),

Association for the Study of Food and Society (ASFS),

& Society for Anthropology of Food and Nutrition

June 9 – 12, 2011

University of Montana – Missoula

Food and Agriculture Under the Big Sky

The conference theme acknowledges the site for the meetings in Montana, which is known as Big Sky Country because of its expansive landscapes dotted with working farms, ranches, forests, and wild areas.  The Big Sky also encompasses the broader global context linking food and agricultural systems around the world.  In many ways, Montana shares characteristics with rural areas elsewhere.  In their struggle for sustainable livelihoods and food security, farmers, ranchers, and their communities are challenged by concentration of economic power and the vagaries of global markets.   Yet, like in many other areas, Montanans are cultivating place-based innovations in food, farming and conservation.  Thus, on the one hand, the industrialization, concentration, and globalization of the dominant food system profoundly influence how food is produced, processed, and consumed.  On the other hand, there are also spaces of resistance and creativity in which people attempt to govern and shape their relationships with food and agricultural systems.

Acknowledging these strategies for transformation, the 2011 theme highlights people, partnerships and policies.  At the core of efforts to grow innovative food and agriculture systems are talented and dedicated individuals.  Making effective collective action possible, partnerships honor connections among people and organizations across public and private sectors.  Lastly, attention to policies signals the broader context of government, trade, and legal agreements that shape local, regional, national, and global food and agricultural politics and practices.   Join us under the Big Sky to explore the possibilities and strategies for change.

Although our organizations encourage a broad spectrum of topics at our conferences, we especially encourage papers, posters, panel sessions, roundtables, and workshops that speak directly to the theme.  We welcome not only academic sessions, but also strongly encourage activists, government staff, and those with practical knowledge of food and agricultural systems to participate.   We welcome submissions on all aspects of food, nutrition, and agriculture, including those related to:

  • Agroecology & Conservation
  • Art, Media, & Literary Analyses
  • Change & Development
  • Culture & Cultural Geography
  • Environment & Climate Change
  • Ethics & Philosophy
  • Food Safety & Risk
  • Gender & Ethnicity
  • Globalization
  • History
  • Inequality, Access, Security & Justice
  • Knowledge
  • Local Food Systems
  • Pedagogy
  • Politics, Policies & Governance in National & Global Contexts
  • Research Methods, Practices & Issues
  • Social Action & Social Movements
  • Sustainability
  • Science & Technologies

Click here for the main conference web site and here for abstract submission information.

Posted by David Beriss

Leave a comment

Filed under anthropology, Call for Papers, SAFN Member Research

Food Anthropology in Montreal!

Call for Papers: Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition 

Your opportunity to present at the 110th American Anthropological Association  annual meeting in Montréal, November 16-20, 2010

The theme of this year’s meeting is ”Traces, Tidemarks and Legacies”. The executive committee asks us to reflect on these concepts and process of how differences are made, marked, removed, maintained and altered. The membership of SAFN is well-positioned to take a leading role in addressing this theme, given both the universality and malleability of food beliefs, nutritional practices, and resultant health and disease. As a truly interdisciplinary group of scholars within anthropology, the SAFN membership is in a unique position to demonstrate how anthropology’s holistic perspective remains a powerful tool for both understanding and tackling the global issue of “Traces, Tidemarks, and Legacies”. For more information about the national meeting, including elaboration of the theme and important dates, see the AAA meetings web site.

There are three types of sessions for papers and posters: (1) Invited, (2) Volunteered, and (3) AAA Public Policy Forums. While many authors have historically preferred the paper format, the major advantage of presenting a poster over a paper is that instead of 15 minutes of fame, you get an hour and half, during which time you can discuss and debate your findings and ideas.

If you are interested in having an Invited session, please send your proposals to Sera Young (sly3@cornell.edu) no later than March 13; earlier is better. You must also submit your proposed session on the AAA meeting website by then. Session proposals should include a session abstract (250 words) and the names and details (institution, title) of all co-authors. Invited sessions are generally cutting-edge, directly related to the meeting theme, or cross sub-disciplines, i.e. they have broader appeal. One way to increase your and our presence at the meetings is to have a co-sponsored invited session between SAFN and another sub-discipline.  Invited time is shared with the other sub-discipline and the session is double-indexed. Volunteered sessions are comprised of individually submitted papers or posters that are put together based on some common theme as well as sessions proposed as invited that were not selected as such. These must be submitted via the AAA website by April 15. AAA Public Policy Forums are reviewed by the AAA Committee on Public Policy, the deadline for those is March 15. If you’d like to discuss ideas for sessions and/or papers, feel free to contact the 2011 Program Chair, Sera Young (sly3@cornell.edu, 607-351-0172).

AAA is increasingly open to innovative presentation styles, including round table discussions, meet the author, panel discussions and poster sessions. All of these are submitted through the AAA registration website.
We look forward to seeing the fruits of your fascinating research!

1 Comment

Filed under AAA 2011 Montreal, Announcements, anthropology, Call for Papers, SAFN Member Research

Contaminated cuisines and the omnivore’s dilemma

The Egg of Death?

As a service to our readers and with the permission of the editors of Anthropology News, we have decided to republish each month’s SAFN column from that publication.  This, then, is the December 2010 column, edited by Kenneth Maes and Alyson Young.

Contaminated cuisines and the omnivore’s dilemma
By George Armelagos (Emory U) and Kenneth Maes (Brown U)

Much media and scholarly attention has been paid to obesity epidemics. More recently, worry over food safety in terms of pathogenic infection and toxicity has assumed prominence on par with concerns about over-nutrition. George Armelagos, Goodrich C. White Professor of Anthropology at Emory University and recipient of the AAA’S 2008 Franz Boas Award for Exemplary Service, recently took on both of these issues in an article published in the Journal of Anthropological Research (66[2]:161-186), entitled “The Omnivore’s Dilemma: The Evolution of the Brain and the Determinants of Food Choice.” The article critiques Michael Pollan’s popular book The Omnivore’s Dilemma for ignoring the importance of infectious epidemics caused by industrial food systems in the US. Below, George Armelagos and Kenneth Maes discuss the omnivore’s dilemma in light of last summer’s massive salmonella outbreak in the US egg supply.

Omnivores have a predilection for a varied diet, but this represents a challenge given that new foods are often feared for their potentially poisonous and deadly qualities. This is the omnivore’s dilemma: the confrontation between neophilia and neophobia.

The omnivore’s dilemma for our primate cousins is instructive. The rainforest may seem to be an unlimited source of food, much like a supermarket. But many plants have evolved toxins for their own protection. In 1978, Daniel Janzens commented that the primate world is not colored various shades of green, but instead colored morphine, caffeine, tannin, phenol, oxalic acid, and saponin. Thus potential jungle foods demand careful discrimination.

The invention of cuisine was an essential process in human biocultural evolution. As a cultural system, cuisine determines items in nature that are potentially edible and how they are processed into food, flavored or enhanced, and eaten in a culturally-correct manner.  Cuisine is thus an attempted solution to the omnivore’s dilemma. But not all aspects of a cuisine are adaptive. Aspects of an industrialized food system can be severely maladaptive—and thus the omnivore’s dilemma remains unvanquished for modern humans.

This is illustrated by last summer’s recall of a half-billion eggs after nearly 1300 cases of salmonella infection were reported among US consumers. This massive number of eggs came from only two factory farms in Iowa, which in turn had a common supplier of chicken feed. This attests to the extent of conglomeration in the food industry, driven by a desire for cheaper food, which incentivizes the cutting of safety corners. Neither factory involved in the recall had ever been inspected by the top federal and state agencies responsible for food safety oversight (for details, click here).

In last summer’s salmonella epidemic, hens were individually exposed to infected rodent feces, leading to salmonella infection of their ovaries and thus their developing eggs. In previous salmonella outbreaks spread by chicken eggs, the mode of transmission involved contamination of the outer shells of already-laid eggs. This is controlled by more stringent procedures in preparing eggs for market. Unfortunately, such procedures cannot prevent the infection of hens’ ovaries and thus eggs that are infected “from the inside-out.”

In 1999, Paul Mead and colleagues at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that food-borne diseases cause approximately 76 million illnesses and 5,000 deaths in the US each year. Salmonella, Listeria, and Toxoplasma are responsible for 1,500 of these deaths, while the majority of deaths and illnesses are caused by unknown food-borne agents, including toxins, viruses, and other bacteria. For Mead and colleagues, the importance of these unknown agents cannot be overstated. Yet 63% of US shoppers feel that foods sold in supermarkets are safe, though this percentage may be dropping.

Throughout human evolution, contaminated or poisonous foods have posed a problem despite the attempts of cuisine to keep them out of our bodies. Michael Pollan’s popular writings overlook this aspect of the omnivore’s dilemma. For Pollan, the dilemma faced by humans in the U.S. and around the world involves the long-term health consequences of over-consuming sugars, fats and salt. Over-nutrition is certainly important, but is only part of the dietary dilemma faced by people today. A complete understanding of the omnivore’s dilemma must include the more immediate dangers posed by infectious microbes and toxins in industrialized food systems. Perhaps rainforests and supermarkets share a fundamental similarity after all.

Please send your news and items of interest to Kenneth Maes or Alyson Young.

Leave a comment

Filed under anthropology, culture, economics, food policy, food security, nutrition, obesity, SAFN Member Research, sustainability

2010 Christine Wilson Award Winners

The Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (SAFN) is pleased to announce and congratulate the winners of the 2010 Christine Wilson Award (CWA) Student Paper Competition. The award is named in memory  of Dr. Christine Wilson (1919-2005) one of the scholars who began to connect the once disparate fields of nutrition, human behavior, and culture into the interdisciplinary field of nutritional anthropology—which strives to understand the reasons people eat what they do as well as when, how, and where they eat.  In her memory and honor, SAFN encourages contributions to the field and recognizes outstanding student achievement at the graduate and undergraduate level.  A total of eleven papers were submitted for this years’ competition with papers that presented original research on a host of food and/or nutrition- related topics.  Two selection committees formed by SAFN board members and eager volunteers reviewed and evaluated the work to identify the winning papers and their runners-up.  The students were recognized on Friday, November 19, during the SAFN business meeting at the American Anthropological Association Annual meeting held at the Sheraton Hotel in New Orleans, La.

Graduate Students:

  • 1st Place: “Virginia Ham: the Local and Global of Colonial Foodways” by  Megan E.Edwards  of the University of Chicago.
  • Runner-Up: “The Refugees Dilemma: Constructing Identity through Cuisine at French Azilum” submitted by Maureen Costura of Cornell University.

    Mike McDonald and Maureen Costura

Undergraduate Students:

  • 1st Place: “Growing a New New Orleans: an Ethnography of the MareketUmbrella.org and the Crescent City Farmers Market” submitted by   Seth A. Gray of the University of New Orleans.

    Seth Gray and Mike McDonald

  • Runner-Up: ” Morality, Temperance and Immigration: American Prohibition and Racism in the 1920s” submitted by Andrew Flachs of Oberlin College.

The Christine Wilson Award committee encourages all students to look ahead to the 2011 competition which is open to all graduate and undergraduate students, full or part-time, attending an accredited academic program. This is a great opportunity to get your ideas into circulation. Your work may lead to the development of new methodology or provide new insight into a food-related topic or perhaps apply proven ideas or methods in a novel way.  Please look for announcements on the SAFN website for details on next year’s competition.

With Kind Regards,

MRMcD

Michael R. McDonald, Ph.D.

Chair, Christine Wilson Award Committee

Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition

posted by David Beriss

1 Comment

Filed under AAA 2010 New Orleans, anthropology, Christine Wilson, SAFN Member Research

2010 Christine Wilson Award

The Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (SAFN) is pleased to invite students to submit papers in competition for the 2010 Christine Wilson Awards presented to outstanding undergraduate and graduate research papers on a topic that spans the perspectives in nutrition or food studies and anthropology.

Papers may report on research undertaken in whole or in part by the author.  Papers must have as their primary focus an anthropological approach to the study of food and/or nutrition and must present original research.  Literature reviews are not eligible. Papers that present new empirical research, evaluate a community nutrition intervention, propose a new conceptual framework, or outline a novel research design or methodological approaches are especially welcome.  All applicants must have current membership in SAFN.  Winners will be recognized and presented with an award at the 2010 AAA meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana and receive a year’s membership in SAFN.

Eligibility is restricted to students (undergraduate or graduate) enrolled in the 2010-2011 academic year.  The text of papers should be no longer than 20-25 pages, double-spaced. Please delete identifying information and submit with the CWA cover sheet- (http://www.nutritionalanthro.org/index.php).

Please mail in triplicate or submit as an email attachment to:

Michael R. McDonald, Ph.D.
Professor of Anthropology
College of Arts and Sciences
Florida Gulf Coast University
10501 FGCU Blvd.
Ft. Myers, Florida  33965
mmcdonal@fgcu.edu

Deadline: October 5, 2010

Posted by David Beriss

(Who wants to add that he just copied this announcement from the email notice.)

Leave a comment

Filed under Announcements, anthropology, Call for Papers, SAFN Member Research

Food and Ag Under the Big Sky

Announcing the Joint 2011 Annual Meetings of the

Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society (AFHVS),

Association for the Study of Food and Society (ASFS),

& Society for Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (SAFN)

June 9 – 12, 2011

University of Montana – Missoula

Call for Participation

The conference theme acknowledges the site for the meetings in Montana, which is known as Big Sky Country because of its expansive landscapes dotted with working farms, ranches, forests, and wild areas.  The Big Sky also encompasses the broader global context linking food and agricultural systems around the world.  In many ways, Montana shares characteristics with rural areas elsewhere.  In their struggle for sustainable livelihoods and food security, farmers, ranchers, and their communities are challenged by concentration of economic power and the vagaries of global markets.   Yet, like in many other areas, Montanans are cultivating place-based innovations in food, farming and conservation.  Thus, on the one hand, the industrialization, concentration, and globalization of the dominant food system profoundly influence how food is produced, processed, and consumed.  On the other hand, there are also spaces of resistance and creativity in which people attempt to govern and shape their relationships with food and agricultural systems.

Acknowledging these strategies for transformation, the 2011 theme highlights people, partnerships and policies.  At the core of efforts to grow innovative food and agriculture systems are talented and dedicated individuals.  Making effective collective action possible, partnerships honor connections among people and organizations across public and private sectors.  Lastly, attention to policies signals the broader context of government, trade, and legal agreements that shape local, regional, national, and global food and agricultural politics and practices.   Join us under the Big Sky to explore the possibilities and strategies for change.

Although our organizations encourage a broad spectrum of topics at our conferences, we especially encourage papers, posters, panel sessions, roundtables, and workshops that speak directly to the theme.  We welcome not only academic sessions, but also strongly encourage activists, government staff, and those with practical knowledge of food and agricultural systems to participate.   We welcome submissions on all aspects of food, nutrition, and agriculture, including those related to:

  • Art, Media, & Literary Analyses
  • Change & Development
  • Culture & Cultural Geography
  • Environment & Climate Change
  • Agroecology & Conservation
  • Ethics & Philosophy
  • Food Safety & Risk
  • Gender & Ethnicity
  • Globalization
  • History
  • Inequality, Access, Security & Justice
  • Knowledge
  • Local Food Systems
  • Pedagogy
  • Politics, Policies & Governance in National & Global Contexts
  • Research Methods, Practices & Issues
  • Social Action & Social Movements
  • Sustainability
  • Science & Technologies

Tours (tentative):

Montana is home to many food, farming, and conservation initiatives that will make for lively and informative tours.  Our tentative plans include the following:

  • Journey up the famed Blackfoot River valley where ranchers rear grass-fed cattle for local markets, practice rest-rotation grazing, and participate in one of the most significant efforts at community-based watershed management, wildlife conservation and land use planning – the Blackfoot Challenge.
  • Explore efforts to build the infrastructure for local food markets – from the farm level, to a highly-successful growers’ marketing cooperative, to micro-processing and business assistance, and to delivery to restaurants and cafeterias.
  • Visit the Flathead Indian Reservation, home to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, to learn about water rights, tribal sovereignty, cultural heritage, and environmental stewardship.
  • Explore several initiatives working with people, partnerships, and policies to enhance community food security and to protect the fertile soils that are the basis of all food systems.

Conference Location and Special Features:

Nestled in the Northern Rockies, Missoula is a vibrant, small city.  Conference events will be held on the beautiful University of Montana campus, just a short walk to dorms, hotels and downtown.  Missoula’s downtown bustles with art galleries, small businesses, excellent restaurants, micro-breweries, museums, farmers markets, and even a carousel featuring hand-crafted ponies.  Of course, recreational opportunities abound.  Trails run alongside the Clark Fork River through downtown, while the Rattlesnake Wilderness Area begins a mere four miles from the city center.  Several other wilderness areas are within a 1-2 hour drive.  Glacier National Park is three hours to the north, and Yellowstone National Park is five hours to the southeast.  Fly fishing enthusiasts come from around the world to try their luck on our famed rivers, like the Big Blackfoot.  For more information:   http://www.visitmt.com and http://missoula.montana.com.

Keynote Addresses:

  • “The Culture of the Table:  Reweaving the Contexts of Celebration” by Albert Borgmann Regents Professor of Philosophy at the University of Montana, noted author, and widely-respected philosopher of society and culture with a particular emphasis on technology.
  • Remarks on Food and Agricultural Policy by US Senator Jon Tester (D-MT), the only active farmer in Congress and a pioneer of organic agriculture in Montana (tentative).

Organizers and Local Arrangements Co-Chairs:

Jill Belsky, University of Montana, jill.belsky@umontana.edu

Neva Hassanein, University of Montana, neva.hassanein@umontana.edu

Program Committee Co-Chairs:

Alison Harmon, Montana State University harmon@montana.edu

Mary Stein, Montana State University mstein@montana.edu

This conference is being organized collaboratively by faculty and staff from the University of Montana, Montana State University, and allied organizations and agencies.

Procedures for Submitting Abstracts:

Posters, Papers, Panels, Roundtables or Workshops

Due Date: February 1, 2011

Types of Sessions: Submissions may include proposals for:

  1. Research or Project Posters
  2. Individual papers (can have multiple authors)
  3. Panels (3-4 papers around a single theme)
  4. Roundtables (informal discussion with several leaders on a particular topic)
  5. Workshops (interactive session providing some training and opportunity for collective thought and creativity)

Submission: Abstracts should be submitted electronically and on-line.  A web-based format for submissions will become available in late fall 2010. Watch the websites for the societies and the conference for more details.

The following contents will be required:

  1. Type of submission
  2. Title
  3. Submitter’s name, organizational affiliation, and full mailing address
  4. Submitter’s e-mail address
  5. Submitter’s telephone number
  6. Names and organizational affiliations of co-authors on papers or posters
  7. Email addresses for all co-authors, panelists, and/or roundtable participants
  8. Abstract (250 words or less) describing the proposed paper, poster, panel, roundtable, or workshop.  For panels, please include an abstract for the panel as a whole, and an individual abstract for each individual paper.  Include contact information for the moderator (name, affiliation, e-mail, and phone) and each presenter.  Other types of sessions involving more than one presenter should include name, affiliation, e-mail, and phone number for each person involved.

Acknowledgment and Notification: All proposals sent by e-mail will be acknowledged within a week of receipt.  We are able to either “accept” or “not accept.”   Our limited capacity will not allow us to provide a critique, and we reserve the right to limit multiple submissions by the same author.   Notification of status of proposal will be sent by February 28th.

Student Paper Competitions: To encourage participation by undergraduate and graduate students and to recognize excellence, both ASFS and AFHVS invite submissions to their student paper competitions.  Participants are encouraged to submit abstracts to the conference as well.  Please note that a paper may be submitted to only one, not both, of the competitions.  For more information please see: AFHVS or ASFS.  Direct your submissions to one of the following:

ASFS Student Paper Committee Chair: Riki Saltzman Riki.Saltzman@iowa.edu

AFHVS Student Paper Committee Chair: Janet Chrzan jchrzan@sas.upenn.edu


Posted by David Beriss

Leave a comment

Filed under Announcements, anthropology, Call for Papers

Food in Bloom

One of the best food conferences of the year promises to be even better in 2010.

The 12th annual joint conference of the Association for the Study of Food and Society and the Agriculture, Food and Human Values Society will be joined this year by the annual meeting (first, if I am not mistaken) of the Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition.  The sponsors of this wonderful blog, in other words.

The conference itself is June 2 to June 5 in scenic Bloomington, Indiana.  The host institution, Indiana University, is home to some of the leading scholars in food studies and should make for a nice setting for people to think about food.  I have heard that there are some surprisingly good things to eat there too.  In my experience, Indiana is one of the best places in the country for sweet corn, but I suppose it is too early in the year for that.

Meanwhile, check out the conference program.  The panels and papers represent the cutting edge of food studies, across several disciplines.  There will be papers on sustainability, on food propaganda, on Big Food (Wal-Mart, for example), food education, nutrition, food coops, famine, social media, restaurants, farmer’s markets, cookbooks, national identity, etc.  SAFN has sponsored several panels, which we have listed below.

There are also a number of interesting side activities at the conference, including tours in the vicinity that explore food security, “grass” farms that take unusual approaches to raising dairy and meat, visits to artisanal breweries, and what looks like a pleasant opportunity to take a boat ride and eat BBQ.  You can go on a foraging tour, looking for seasonal eats in the surrounding wilderness (is there wilderness in Indiana?).  The heartland at its best.  There are museum tours, receptions, a banquet…and a workshop on how to teach culinary improvisation.

Finally, there will be a keynote address from Will Allen, 2008 winner of a MacArthur fellowship and innovative urban farmer.  This may be one of the keys to the future of food and I am really looking forward to his talk.

This promises to be a really great conference.  If you can get yourself to Bloomington, I think you will be rewarded with a lot to think about and a great time.

I’ve listed the SAFN-sponsored panels below.  There are other anthropologists participating in non-SAFN panels (we are everywhere!) and, of course, there is just a staggering amount of interesting work to hear at this conference.  Don’t miss it!

(Re)defining Food in an Era of Dietary Change

Black, Rachel  “Amaro: a boozy, bitter history of digestivi from the pharmacy to the bar”

Johnston, Susan L  “What is a vegetable?”

Yates-Doerr, Emily  “The complexity of reduction: perspectives on nourishment in the Guatemalan Highlands”

Zycherman, Ariela  “Indirect effects of regional development on diet: redefining food among the Tsimané”

Agriculture as education

Altshul,Katarina S.  “Life’s a garden…. dig it: Youth perspectives on crisis and food systems”

McCollum, Timothy J.  “Dirt in the Classroom, Thought in the Field: Civic Agriculture as Pedagogy in a Liberal Arts Context”

Niewolny, Kim L. , Susan F. Clark  “Restoring Community Foodsheds in Unlikely Places: Challenges and Possibilities of Civic Agriculture As a Concept For Higher Education Curriculum”

Food, Identity, and Place: Local production and cross-pollination

Fajans, Jane  “Açaí: from the Amazon to the world”

Hall, Olivia  “Preserving Plums, Preserving Place: Traditional Food Products in Poland and the Europe of Regions”

Haupt, Timothy  “Chinese food in Berlin – from both sides of the kitchen door”

From Global to Local and Back Again: Pan-American Perspectives on Rice and Beans

Beriss, David  “Red Beans and Rebuilding:  An Iconic Dish, Memory and Culture in New Orleans”

Berleant, Riva  “Rice and Beans in the Eastern Caribbean”

Montero, Carla Guerron  “All in One Pot: The Place of Rice and Beans in Panama’s Regional and National Cuisine”

Preston-Werner, Theresa  “Defending National Foodways: Laying Claim to Tradition in Costa Rica”

Wilk, Richard, Discussant

Family nutrition

Benyshek, Daniel C.  “Human Placenta: From Biohazard to Food and Medicine for Mom”

Namie, Joylin  “Public Displays of Affection:  Mothers and Requests for Junk Food from Children”

Sellen, Daniel W.  “Complementary feeding, evolution and baby food marketing”

Food and meaning: Taste, ethnicity, memory

Pérez, Ramona Lee  “Seeing with Sabor: Flavor in/of Latino New York”

Valora, Amanda  “Plates in Hand and Mind– Food and Memory in Copacabana, Bolivia”

Weinreb, Alice  “‘Native foods’ and ‘authentic recipes’ in postwar West Germany: The racial politics of gustatory authenticity after the Third Reich”

Yamin-Pasternak, Sveta  “The Rotten Renaissance: Aged Foods and the Importance of Their (Re)Acquired Taste in post-Soviet Chukotka”

Eating on the Edges while Farming in the Center: Alternative Agriculture in Postsocialist Societies

Caldwell, Melissa L.  “Growing the Nation: Fresh Food, Organic Capitalism, and Community Organizing in Russian Gardens”

Jung, Yuson  “Ambivalent Consumers and Niche Producers: Organic Food Movement in Postsocialist Bulgaria”

Klein, Jakob “Reconnecting with the Countryside? ‘Alternative’ Food Networks with Chinese Characteristics”

Watson, James L.  “Discussant”

Social Constructions of Prenatal Nutrition

Chrzan, Janet  ““My baby doesn’t like pork, because her dad is Muslim”: Beliefs about food intake, digestion and infant outcomes among African American teen gravidas”

Moreno-Black, Geraldine and Melissa Cheyney “Food is More than Nutrition: Nutritional Counseling and the Language of Prenatal Diet in Midwifery and Obstetric Practice”

Vallianatos, Helen “Feeding Our Babies, Feeding Our Selves:  Food, Reproduction and Identity among Immigrant Women”

SAFN ROUNDTABLE: Just Food? How Louisville Kentucky organized for food justice for all.

Moskowitz, Karyn; Lisa Markowitz, Yvonne Jones, Jenrose Fitzgerald, Joshua Jennings

Globalization

Feltault, Kelly  “Dark Skin, Safe Seafood & Entrepreneurial Citizens: Racializing HACCP and Development Policy in Thailand.”

Katz, Esther  “Threatened sustainability of the Rio Negro food system (Brazilian Amazon)”

Richard, Analiese  ““Trasgénicos, ¡Ni Maiz!”: Genetic Risk and the Body Politic in Mexico’s Food Sovereignty Movement”

Rosing, Howard  “Ataca el ácido úrico (Uric Acid Attack): Nutritional Beliefs, Imported Pinto Bean Sales and the Political Economy of Domestic Bean Avoidance in the Dominican Republic”

Reconstructing Local Food Systems to Provide for All

Bomba, Megan  “Ya no está sufriendose por la comida (No longer suffering for food): How Can Home Food Production Improve Food Security and Nutrition in Rural, Coastal Ecuador”

Cunningham, Sarah  “So You Want to Start a Campus Food Pantry?  Local food for food security”

Daye, Rebecka  “Canastas Comunitarias in Ilaló, Ecuador”

Gross, Joan E.  “Discursive Tensions in the Development of a Local Food Movement”

Posted by David Beriss

Leave a comment

Filed under Announcements, SAFN Member Research, Uncategorized

Food and Anthropology, the blog you have been waiting for!

Welcome to the blog of the Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition.

Someday this blog will be seen as one of the first steps in establishing SAFN as the place people go when they ask, “what would an anthropologist think about food?”  If you have not asked that question yet, then you should.  Read here to find out why.  Right now there is really only one other place you can go for that kind of information and it is also part of the growing SAFN intellectual empire: http://www.nutritionalanthro.org/.  That is the SAFN home page, of course.  If you go there, you can join in with hundreds of others who are discussing food, nutrition and anthropology right now.  Also, there are some nice pictures and some really useful information on the SAFN bulletin board.  If you join SAFN, you can get access to even more stuff, such as our brilliant syllabi set.

There are a lot of blogs about food out there.  There are some really good anthropology blogs too.  We think there is room—even a need—for a blog the brings anthropological insights to the discussion of food and nutrition around our planet.  The members of SAFN have been studying all aspects of food and nutrition for decades.  From biology to culture, we’ve probably got it covered.  Many of our members write scholarly books and articles.  If you are not a scholar of some sort, you probably don’t read those books and articles.  But don’t fret: we’ll bring you the insights of those authors here, in terms and style that will make you want to keep on reading. Through your comments and participation in the SAFN bulletin board, we hope this blog will become the starting point for many lively debates.  If you are a scholar, you’ll find the open discussion of concepts, issues and ideas here inspiring and refreshing.  We promise.

Our hope is that members of SAFN will feel welcome to submit blog posts here (send them to foodanthro@gmail.com) about the food and nutrition issues of the day, or about really interesting aspects of their own research.  Entries should be limited to 500 words and should be written in a relaxed style.  They should be completely original.  The only bibliographic references we want are those that will be useful to the readers of the blog—links to other sites on the web are especially useful.  Of course, provide references where necessary to avoid plagiarism.  See the contributor page of the blog for more details.

This is going to be a lively blog.  Subscribe to out RSS feed and make it part of the list of blogs you scan regularly.  We are pretty certain that you will find it worthwhile.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized