Tag Archives: SAFN

SAFN 2016 Distinguished Speaker Lisa Heldke

Please join us for the SAFN reception and distinguished speaker on Saturday, Nov. 19 at 7:45pm at the AAA conference in Minneapolis. This year our distinguished speaker is Lisa Heldke, Professor of Philosophy at Gustavus Adolphus College. Prof. Heldke’s work explores the philosophical significance of food, which she explores in her book Exotic Appetites: Ruminations of a Food Adventurer, two co-edited volumes Cooking, Eating, Thinking: Transformative Philosophies of Food and The Atkins Diet and Philosophy, and numerous articles.

lisa-heldke

The title of Heldke’s talk is “It’s Chomping All the Way Down: Guts, Dirt and Fundamental(ish) Metaphysical Concepts”. The following is an amuse bouche that will hopefully whet your appetite for the talk:

How are we to understand the concepts of individual, and of person, in the age of the microbiome? We are awash in news accounts of research into the microorganisms that live on our skin, in our guts and in the soil. We learn that humans play host to more individual non-human organisms than we have cells of “our own,” and that those organisms play vital roles in essential processes such as digestion. The deep interdependence between humans and our microbiotic “guests” has led biologist Scott Gilbert to declare, “we are all lichens”—that is, “multicellular eukaryote[s] plus colonies of persistent symbionts.”

But symbiotic “lichen personhood” tells only part of the story of what it means to be a biological individual. Another, crucial, part is this: our bodies may end up playing host to a set of parasitic guests who deplete our hospitality and sicken or even kill us. Parasitism is not an inessential, accidental, or infrequent occurrence. Furthermore, the distinction between parasite and symbiont is neither sharp nor static; today’s symbiont may be tomorrow’s parasite. A conception of personhood must not simply acknowledge but also absorb this feature of existence.

Taking parasitism to be metaphysically relevant and instructive challenges the dualisms that dominate western metaphysics, in particular the self/other dualism. The parasite, taken both literally and figuratively, calls us to refabricate models of personhood that have rested on this tidy division. The result is a relational ontology with teeth.

1 Comment

Filed under AAA 2016 Minneapolis, anthropology

Christine Wilson Award 2016

Announcing the 2016 Christine Wilson Award

This is an exciting award for outstanding student research examining topics in nutrition, food studies and anthropology. Exemplary graduate and undergraduate papers are accepted.

Guidelines for Submission of Your Entry:

  • Paper must present original, empirical research (literature reviews not eligible) undertaken in whole or in part by the author.
  • Primary focus must be on anthropological approach to food and/or nutrition.
  • Author (or first author for co-authored papers) must be currently enrolled as a student (undergraduate or graduate), or enrolled during the past academic year
  • Papers should be no longer than 25 pages, double-spaced, and follow American Anthropological Association (AAA) style guidelines)

Winners of the graduate and undergraduate awards receive a cash prize + a year’s membership in SAFN.

DEADLINE: JULY 1, 2016 [NOTE NEW AND EARLIER DEADLINE]

Submit your paper to Amy Trubek via email at atrubek@uvm.edu

More details about the award, as well as the cover sheet, are available here.

Leave a comment

Filed under anthropology, awards, Christine Wilson

CFP: Best Annual Food Studies Conference!

asfs-conference-logo_small-e1448987738449

Here is the call for papers for the best annual food studies conference in North America with the most confusing name. This is the annual joint meeting of the Association for the Study of Food and Society, the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society, and, just to confuse matters further this year, the Canadian Association for Food Studies. That makes it the ASFS/AFHVS/CAFS Annual Meeting, which is really fun to try and repeat to friends and colleagues. And to make matters even more fun, SAFN will be a sponsor this year (as we were last year).

All that said, this is a wonderful conference. There are generally around 400 people in attendance, so there is a lot going on, but not so much that you are overwhelmed. You can network easily here and meet all of your food studies heroes. This is an interdisciplinary conference, so you can discover a wide range of approaches to studying food and nutrition. There is usually great food too. Toronto promises to be an interesting city for this event. If you have research you want to present, or if you just want to meet food studies scholars, you should go. The CFP is below (in both English and French!). There are more details on the website. Be sure to scroll all the way down — there is also a CFP for the pre-conference below, which is aimed at students, post-docs, and new scholars in food studies.

ASFS/AFHVS/CAFS Annual Meeting and Conference plus Pre-Conference, June 22-26, 2016 (Version français ci-dessous)

The University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC) is pleased to host the Joint 2016 Annual Meetings and Conference of the Association for the Study of Food and Society; the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society; and the Canadian Association for Food Studies – the first time the three organizations have met together. The conference theme, “Scarborough Fare: Global Foodways and Local Foods in a Transnational City,” emphasizes the changing nature of food production, distribution, and consumption as people, goods, foods and culinary and agricultural knowledge move over long distances and across cultural and national borders. It explores the development of cities and their transnational marketplaces where new and old migrants, entrepreneurs and emerging migrant-origin middle classes settle in suburbs such as Scarborough, rather than in older downtown districts such as the historic Toronto Chinatown along Spadina. To understand global and local food systems, we must give due attention to migrants, whether from rural districts or from cities, for they have historically provided knowledge and labour necessary to feed societies, while also altering the foodways of long-time natives of the areas where they settle. We invite participants to examine the role of mobile people as workers, entrepreneurs, and innovators in agriculture, culinary infrastructure, and food preparation and consumption. Submissions may also consider the long distance movement of people, culinary knowledge, and foods as contributors to projects of colonization, sovereignty and creators of global inequalities. The conference will feature cultural events, art exhibits, and a banquet that highlight the diverse communities and cuisines of Scarborough and the Greater Toronto Area. Students and emerging scholars in particular are invited to submit proposals for a pre-conference to be held on June 21 and sponsored by CAFS.

http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/conferences/scarboroughfare/

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS:

AFHVS, ASFS and CAFS support scholarship and public presentation on a wide variety of topics at their conferences. For the 2016 conference, we are encouraging submissions in many formats. We especially encourage submissions that speak to the conference theme. Abstracts may be submitted by scholars, practitioners, activists, and others working in food systems and culture. Abstracts may be submitted and conference papers delivered in either French or English.

SUBMISSIONS AREAS INCLUDE BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO

  • Food Systems: local and global, past and present
  • Culture and cultural studies
  • Discipline-specific and interdisciplinary research
  • Art, design, and technology
  • Ethics, philosophy, and values
  • Food access, security, and sovereignty
  • Migration, immigration, diaspora and transnational community studies
  • Cultural, agricultural, and culinary preservation and innovation
  • Governance, policy, and rights
  • Pedagogy, food education, and/or experiential learning
  • Labor in the food system, production, consumption
  • Energy and agriculture
  • Health: problems, paradigms, and professions

SUBMISSION PROCEDURE:

Abstracts due: January 31st, 2016

ALL PROPOSALS MUST INCLUDE:

  1. type of submission (e.g., paper, a panel, roundtable, petcha kucha, exploration  gallery, etc.);
  2. title of paper, panel, or event;
  3. submitter’s name, organizational affiliation, and status (e.g., undergraduate, graduate student, postdoc, faculty, independent scholar, community)
  4. submitter’s e-mail address;
  5. names, emails and organizational affiliations of co-authors or co-organizers;
  6. abstract of 250 or fewer words that describes the proposed paper, panel, or event;
  7. indication of any AV/technology needs
  8. a list of up to six descriptive keywords/phrases for the program committee to use in organizing sessions and events

For roundtables: Roundtables are informal discussion forums where participants speak for a short time before engaging with audience members. Please submit a single abstract along with a list of participants. There are no formal papers on roundtables.

For panels: Panels are pre-organized groups of no more than 4 papers, with a chair and discussant (who may be one person).  Please include a panel abstract as well as abstracts for each individual paper. Conference organizers will make the utmost effort to preserve panels but they reserve the right to move papers after consultation with panel organizers.

For individual papers: Papers will be grouped with similarly themed topics to the best of the program organizer’s abilities. Please submit a single abstract along with contact information.

For workshops: There will be opportunities for a limited number of workshops, including kitchen demonstrations (please email culinaria@utsc.utoronto.ca to discuss requirements prior to application). Indicate if pre-registration is necessary. Please provide an abstract as well as a detailed list of organizers, resource and space needs, and any expected costs.

For pecha kucha-like presentations: A petcha kucha is a short-form presentation that comprises exactly 20 slides, each shown for exactly 20 seconds (using the automatic timer of PowerPoint or Keynote), for a total presentation time of just 6 minutes and 40 seconds. The goal is to explain one or two key ideas, rather than a complete research study or project. Presenters should think in terms of describing a narrative, a theme, an experimental direction, or another BRIEF notion.

For exploration gallery display and poster proposals: Graduate students, food scholars, NGOs, researchers outside the academy, artists, and other members of the community are welcome to propose works for the 2016 Exploration Gallery. All media are welcome, including installations, print and other visual forms, audio, posters, and other works of art and design. A limited number of screen-based submissions will be accepted.

Notifications of acceptance will be provided by March 1st. Attendees are expected to register by April 30th or they will be removed from the program. Attendees must have current ASFS, CAFS, or AFHVS membership at the time of the conference. The conference organizers regret that they are unable to provide travel support for meeting participation. They reserve the right to limit acceptance of multiple submissions by any one author. Space for workshops is limited and will be determined based on available resources.

Please note that all co-authors/presenters must register individually to be included on the program.

http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/conferences/scarboroughfare/

Please direct questions to culinaria@utsc.utoronto.ca

La Foire de Scarborough

À propos de l’assemblée annuelle et de la conférence

Du 22 au 26 juillet 2016, l’Université de Toronto à Scarborough (UTSC) aura le plaisir d’accueillir l’assemblée annuelle et la conférence 2016 de l’Association for the Study of Food and Society (ASFS); la Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society (AFHVS) et l’Association canadienne des études sur l’alimentation (ACÉA), réunissant pour une première fois les trois organisations. Le thème de la conférence, « La foire de Scarborough : les habitudes alimentaires mondiales et les aliments locaux dans une ville cosmopolite », met l’accent sur le changement qui s’opère dans la production, la distribution et la consommation alimentaires à mesure que les personnes, les biens, les aliments et les connaissances culinaires et agricoles se déplacent sur de longues distances et traversent les cultures et les frontières nationales. Il explore la croissance des villes et leurs marchés cosmopolites, où les nouveaux immigrants et ceux de longue date, les entrepreneurs et les classes moyennes émergentes d’origine immigrante qui se sont installés dans les banlieues, comme Scarborough, plutôt que dans les quartiers plus anciens du centre-ville comme l’historique quartier chinois de Toronto, le long de Spadina. Pour comprendre les systèmes alimentaires locaux et mondiaux, nous devons porter une attention toute particulière aux migrants, que ce soit dans les zones rurales ou urbaines, car, historiquement, ils ont apporté les connaissances et le travail ayant contribué à nourrir les sociétés, tout en modifiant aussi les habitudes alimentaires des résidents de longue date dans les régions où ils se sont installés. Nous invitons les personnes participantes à étudier le rôle des personnes mobiles comme les travailleurs, les entrepreneurs, les innovateurs en agriculture, en infrastructure culinaire, en préparation et en consommation d’aliments. Les propositions peuvent également examiner la circulation des personnes, de la connaissance culinaire et des aliments sur une longue distance pour leur contribution aux projets de colonisation, de souveraineté et de création des inégalités mondiales. La conférence présentera des événements culturels, des expositions artistiques et une réception qui célèbrera la diversité des collectivités et des cuisines de Scarborough et de la grande région de Toronto. On invite particulièrement les étudiants, les étudiantes et les nouveaux chercheurs à soumettre des propositions pour la préconférence financée par l’ACÉA, qui se tiendra le 21 juin.

http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/conferences/scarboroughfare/fr/home-fr/

DEMANDE DE PRÉSENTATION DE RÉSUMÉS :

La AFHVS, l’ASFS et l’ACÉA favorisent la présentation de travaux de recherche et d’exposés publics sur une vaste sélection de sujets à leurs conférences. Nous encourageons, pour l’édition de 2016, divers formats de propositions, particulièrement celles qui abordent le thème de la conférence. Les résumés peuvent être présentés par des chercheurs, des professionnels, des activistes et autres personnes travaillant dans les systèmes alimentaires et la culture. Les résumés peuvent être présentés en français ou en anglais, ainsi que les communications pour la conférence.

LES PROPOSITIONS COMPRENNENT NOTAMMENT LES SUJETS SUIVANTS :

  • les systèmes alimentaires : locaux et mondiaux, passés et actuels
  • la culture et les études culturelles
  • la recherche interdisciplinaire ou dans une seule discipline
  • les arts, le design et la technologie
  • l’éthique, la philosophie et les valeurs
  • l’accès aux aliments, la sécurité et la souveraineté alimentaires
  • la migration, l’immigration, la diaspora et les études sur les collectivités cosmopolites
  • la culture, l’agriculture et la préservation et l’innovation culinaires
  • la gouvernance, les politiques et les droits
  • la pédagogie, l’éducation alimentaire et l’apprentissage par l’expérience
  • la main-d’œuvre dans le système alimentaire, la production et la consommation
  • l’énergie et l’agriculture
  • la santé : les problèmes, les paradigmes et les professions

PROCÉDURE DE DÉPÔT DES PROPOSITIONS :

Date butoir de réception des résumés : 31 janvier 2016

TOUTES LES PROPOSITIONS DOIVENT COMPRENDRE :

  1. le type de proposition (p. ex. une communication, un panel, une table ronde, une présentation Pecha Kucha, une salle d’exposition, etc.);
  2. le titre de la communication, du panel ou de l’événement;
  3. le nom de la personne qui soumet une proposition, son affiliation organisationnelle et son statut (p. ex. premier cycle, deuxième cycle, postdoctorat, universitaire, chercheur indépendant, collectivité)
  4. l’adresse courriel de la personne qui soumet une proposition;
  5. les noms, courriels et affiliations organisationnelles des coauteurs ou coorganisateurs;
  6. le résumé, 250 mots et moins, qui décrit la communication, le panel ou l’événement proposé;
  7. l’indication de tout besoin audiovisuel ou technologique
  8. une liste comprenant jusqu’à six phrases ou mots clés descriptifs que le comité de programme pourra utiliser dans l’organisation des séances et des événements

Tables rondes : Les tables rondes sont des forums de discussion informelle où les personnes participantes s’expriment pendant une courte période avant d’échanger avec les membres de l’auditoire. Veuillez présenter un seul résumé avec une liste de personnes participantes. Il n’y a pas de communications formelles pour les tables rondes.

Panels : Les panels sont des groupes déjà formés qui ne présentent pas plus de 4 communications et comptent un président ou une présidente et une personne qui expose (qui peut être une seule personne). Veuillez présenter le résumé du panel ainsi que de chacune des communications individuelles. Les personnes qui organisent la conférence déploieront tous les efforts possibles pour préserver les panels, mais se réservent le droit de déplacer les communications après avoir consulté les organisateurs et organisatrices.

Communications individuelles : Les communications seront regroupées par similitude thématique au meilleur des capacités des organisateurs et organisatrices du programme. Veuillez présenter un seul résumé avec les coordonnées d’une personne-ressource.

Ateliers : Un nombre limité d’ateliers pourra être organisé, dont les démonstrations culinaires (veuillez adresser un courriel à culinaria@utsc.utoronto.ca pour en connaître les exigences avant de présenter une proposition). Veuillez indiquer si la préinscription est nécessaire. Veuillez fournir un résumé, une liste détaillée des organisateurs et organisatrices, des ressources et de l’espace requis, ainsi que des coûts prévus.

Propositions de présentations Pecha Kucha : Le Pecha Kucha est une courte présentation qui comporte exactement 20 diapositives, exposées durant 20 secondes chacune (en utilisant la minuterie de PowerPoint ou de Keynote), pour une période totale de présentation de 6 minutes et 40 secondes. Il vise à exposer une ou deux idées clés, plutôt que tout le projet d’étude ou de recherche. Les présentateurs ou présentatrices devraient songer en termes de description, de narration, d’un thème, d’une voie expérimentale ou autre BRÈVE notion.

Propositions pour la salle d’exposition et les communications par affichage : On invite les étudiants et étudiantes de deuxième cycle, les spécialistes de l’alimentation, les ONG, les chercheurs hors université, les artistes et autres membres de la collectivité à présenter des travaux à la salle d’exposition 2016. L’exposition accueille tous les supports, y compris les installations, les documents imprimés et autres formats visuels, audio, affiches et toutes autres œuvres d’art et de design. Le nombre de présentations sur écran accepté sera limité.

Les notifications d’acceptation seront fournies d’ici le 1er mars. Les personnes participantes doivent s’inscrire avant le 30 avril pour ne pas être retirées du programme. Elles doivent être membres en règle de l’ASFS, l’ACÉA ou la AFHVS au moment de la conférence. Les personnes qui organisent la conférence déplorent ne pas pouvoir défrayer le coût du voyage pour la participation à l’assemblée annuelle. Elles se réservent le droit de limiter l’acceptation de soumissions multiples présentées par un seul auteur. L’espace pour les ateliers est limité et sera déterminé en fonction des ressources disponibles.

Veuillez noter que tous les coauteurs, présentateurs et présentatrices doivent s’inscrire individuellement pour apparaître dans le programme.

Veuillez adresser vos questions à culinaria@utsc.utoronto.ca

http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/conferences/scarboroughfare/fr/home-fr/

2016 CAFS Pre-Conference Call for Proposals

For the Joint Conference of Food Researchers from CAFS, ASFS, and AFHVS

2016 Pre-Conference for Students, Postdocs and Emerging Scholars

University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

June 21st 2016

Cost: $30 (lunch and snacks included)

About Pre-Conference

The Canadian Association for Food Studies (CAFS) invites you to join a full day preconference event, open to all students, postdocs and emerging researchers (including new faculty, sessionals, and community-based researchers). The pre-conference is a unique opportunity to engage with like-minded peers, build your connections and networks internationally and across disciplines, share your ideas, and gain both theoretical and practical knowledge and skills of particular relevance to new researchers. The field of food studies is an active and diverse area of research with unique challenges and endless opportunities. This year’s pre-conference programming will focus on the challenges of researching in this diverse field, provide career guidance to emerging researchers in food studies, and include opportunities for participants to share their own research in the format of a poster presentation. The full conference event, titled Scarborough Fare, will be hosted at the University of Toronto, Scarborough campus from June 22-26th 2016. It will be a joint meeting of CAFS and two American associations: Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society (AFHVS), and the Association for the Study of Food and Society (ASFS).

Poster Submissions

This year the pre-conference invites emerging researchers to participate in the Research Fair & Poster Session. The session is an opportunity for burgeoning food researchers to have the space to present a recent research project, paper, or thesis with a 3 minute “elevator pitch” and poster. This session is designed to foster interaction and engagement in a casual setting, and to encourage networking and social connection. If you are interested in participating in the Research Fair & Poster Session, you must submit a completed submission form (attached or below) by Sunday April 17th, 2016 to cafs.preconference@gmail.com. See submission form for complete poster submission guidelines.

Registration

More information on how to register for the pre-conference and Scarborough Fare will be announced at: https://afhvs.wildapricot.org/2016-conference-Toronto-ON

Or contact us with questions at: cafs.preconference@gmail.com.

Appel à communications par affichage 2016

Journée préconférence pour étudiants et chercheurs émergents de l’Association canadienne des études sur l’alimentation (ACÉA)

dans le cadre de la « Scarborough Fare » de l’ACÉA, de l’Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society (AFHVS), et de l’Association for the Study of Food and Society (ASFS).

Université de Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

le 21 juin 2016

Frais d’inscription : 30$ (dîner et collation inclus)

À propos de la journée préconférence

L’ACÉA invite les étudiants, postdoctorants et chercheurs émergents (incluant les nouveaux membres de facultés, chargés de cours et chercheurs du milieu communautaire) à une journée préconférence. Cette journée sera non seulement l’occasion de réseauter avec des chercheurs issus d’une variété de disciplines s’intéressant à l’alimentation, mais aussi d’étendre votre réseau à travers le Canada et même à l’international. Vous pourrez y partager vos idées et améliorer vos connaissances tant pratiques que théoriques sur maints enjeux pertinents pour les jeunes chercheurs. En effet, le champ des études sur l’alimentation est actuellement foisonnant. La diversité des approches et des disciplines qui le traversent sont couplées de défis et de vastes possibilités. C’est dans ce cadre que la programmation de la préconférence sera axée sur les défis inhérents à la recherche sur l’alimentation, sur les manières d’y faire carrière comme jeune chercheur, et ce, tout en offrant la possibilité aux participants de partager leurs recherches sous forme d’une session par affichage. L’événement-conférence intitulé « Scarborough Fare » aura lieu à l’Université de Toronto au campus Scarborough du 22 au 26 juin 2016. Il s’agira d’une rencontre entre trois associations d’importance dans le domaine de l’alimentation en Amérique du Nord, soit une canadienne, l’Association canadienne des études sur l’alimentation (ACÉA), et deux étatsuniennes, l’« Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society » (AFHVS) et l’« Association for the Study of Food and Society» (ASFS).

Propositions pour la session par affichage

Cette année, nous invitons les chercheurs émergents à participer à une session par affichage. Il s’agit d’une occasion de présenter une recherche, une communication scientifique ou une thèse sous forme d’affiche et d’une brève présentation de 3 minutes. L’objectif de cette session est de favoriser les échanges de connaissances, les interactions informelles et le réseautage entre les jeunes chercheurs et les participants à la journée préconférence. Si vous souhaitez participer à la session par affichage, vous devez nous faire parvenir le formulaire de soumission ci-joint dûment rempli par courriel avant le dimanche 17 avril 2016 à cafs.preconference@gmail.com. Pour plus d’informations, veuillez consulter le formulaire de soumission.

Inscriptions

Nous annoncerons prochainement les informations sur comment s’inscrire à la journée preconference et à la « Scarborough Fare » à : https://afhvs.wildapricot.org/2016-conference-Toronto-ON . Si vous avez des questions, contactez-nous à : cafs.preconference@gmail.com.

 

2 Comments

Filed under AFHVS, anthropology, ASFS, CAFS, CFP, conferences

Necessary Knowledge: Where Denver Anthropologists Drink and Eat

John Brett
University of Colorado Denver

As a Denver native and passionate eater of foods, what follows is my personal, if a bit quirky, list of places I would send my friends and colleagues to eat and drink while visiting Denver.  There’s no easy way to organize something of this nature but I’ve added some headings to provide some idea of where things are.  I suppose as a Coloradoan, I should include something on our recently legalized intoxicant but I can’t for lack of experience, but I would refer you to the Cannabist, developed by the Denver Post which has a lot of news and reviews and the number of shops rivals Starbucks in their density (the basics: you have to be over 21 to purchase, can’t consume it in public spaces, and can’t take it with you…).

The Denver food scene is big, complex, a bit weird, but really fun so find some time to explore.  Most of the restaurants are walking or short taxi ride from the convention center but I’ve included some stellar neighborhood restaurants as well.

Where to begin? Beer. Asheville, NC claims to have more microbreweries per capita than anywhere else in the country and I have no reason to dispute that but Denver surely ranges near the top for sheer number of excellent breweries. Microbreweries seem to pop up on a weekly basis so I’ll only mention the ones that always seem to find me at a table.  Most of them have a food truck outside, or are in districts with easy access to food, so it’s easy to “do dinner” around some tasty beer. One of the oldest and still finest breweries in Denver is Great Divide.  The Denver Beer Company actively partners with other brewers and in addition to their solid regular lineup, they often produce some creative new styles.  A long standing Denver institution, My Brother’s Bar (home of the Ralphie buffalo burger), the REI flagship store and Wilderness Exchange are all within a few blocks which can make this an afternoon bored-with-the-meeting excursion.  A small brewer that has made a big name for itself is River North Brewery; their specialty is barrel conditioned ales which to the glass are excellent.  Do the tasting flight to get the full range of options.  In the same neighborhood Epic Brewing Company (actually based out of Salt Lake City) is big and noisy but has plenty of tasty beer.  For those who like their beers sour, the Crooked Stave is the place to go.  For those with a desire for German style lagers, Proust Brewing will take good care of you.  These are my usual haunts; for more suggestions and reviews go to the Denver Post Beer Blog which has been running for several years.

Colorado has also become one of the hotspots for artisanal distilling (yes, some of us are sober some of the time) but I’ll mention only one.  Leopold Brothers produces an interesting line of whisky, gin, vodka and various cordials.  If you’ve got three hours and your Uber app, they do a great three hour tour and tasting.

Onto the food; for lack of a better strategy, I’ll organize restaurants by neighborhood:

Lower Downtown (LoDo): walking, biking, short hop from Convention Center

Any of the James Beard awarded restaurants by Jennifer Jasinski and Beth Gruitch will make you happy.  Their two flagship concepts, both in Larimer Square (two blocks from the convention center) are the Spanish inspired Rioja and the classic French joint, Bistro Vendome, across the street from one another.  Around the corner is their upscale pub, Euclid Hall with a great mix of local and imported beer and not-your-average pub fare.  A little further afield, but still within walking distance is their take on fish, Stoic and Genuine in Union Station.  If you’re in that neighborhood, or love books, be sure to drop into the Tattered Cover, a highly successful and widely known independent bookstore that evokes passionate loyalty among its many supporters (great coffee too).  Also in this area is the newly revitalized Union Station which is a beautiful example of urban renewal and in-fill.

Larimer Square has a host of eateries but I’ll just quickly mention a couple: The Market Deli is a locally owned institution and a great place for a quick breakfast or lunch (check out the salads) and fine coffee; everything is baked in house and their pastries are huge.  Osteria Marco is Italian inspired with good salads, charcuterie and pizza; Tamayo is upscale, modern Mexican with a huge tequila list.

Tucked into a former warehouse district (most of which have been knocked down) you’ll find Domo which serves Japanese country fare and is consistently good.  Their specialty is the wide range of noodle dishes from the Japanese tradition, with seasonal features.

THE HIGHLANDS

Little manA former working class, ethnic neighborhood that has felt the full brunt of gentrification over the last 20 years or so but in consequence has some excellent restaurants.  An early entrant and current mainstay in the neighborhood is Z Cuisine and the next door absinthe bar A Coté.  This is a classic French bistro space, intimate (read, tiny) with a beautiful menu.  A key point: this is not the place to go if you’re in a hurry; they don’t take reservations for parties of fewer than 6 so the routine is to wait (or eat) in the bar until a table opens up.  Two sister restaurants, Root Down, and Linger both feature locally sourced ingredients and innovative menus.  For those interested in “nose to tail” farmhouse cuisine, Old Major is worth a visit—they do all their processing in-house and occasionally feature a pig to pork workshop.  If ice cream helps you get up in the morning, you’ll want to make a stop at Little Man Ice Cream; you can’t miss it; just look for the 28 foot tall cream can…

RIVER NORTH

This mixed warehouse, light manufacturing district is a rapidly urbanizing mix of upscale condo housing, apartments and conversions with the funkiness of a transitional neighborhood, and, of course, a lot of interesting food.  Two restaurants back to back to one Cart Driveranother and always packed are Cart Driver Pizza and Work and Class.  Again, both tend to be noisy and crowded so don’t go if you have serious business to conduct or you’re in a hurry; if neither of those apply, it won’t be time wasted.  If you find yourself at the Crooked Stave for a beer, two restaurants in the same building are worth the effort: Acorn is a small/shared plate place featuring highly creative (but expensive) dishes.  The other option in this space is Comida serves reasonably priced, updated “Mexican street food.”

Not neighborhood specific but fine eating places within 5-10 minutes of the convention center and well worth considering include Satchels on Sixth, Beast and Bottle (nice wine list), and Charcoal; all offer interesting creative menus.  WaterCourse Foods is Denver’s flagship vegan restaurant; you won’t find anything here that pretends to be meat; flavors are unique and you won’t leave hungry; great juice bar.

The Mercury Café is a Denver institution serving locally raised, organic food in a community setting.  There’s almost always somethin’ happenin’ at The Merc—poetry reading, live music, dance…

SAME (So All May Eat) Café is a pay what you can/will with a different menu daily, depending on what’s available—soul satisfying food prepared in a social justice practice.

Three neighborhood restaurants twenty minutes or so from downtown but absolutely worth the trek are Bistro Barbès which is a north African/French inspired place (very small and very popular so make reservations well in advance); The Plimoth is another neighborhood restaurant that is generally reserved full 2-3 weeks out, because it’s really good.

There are dozens of lunch joints, both local and chain, within blocks of the meetings: the 16th Street Mall, Larimer, Market, Blake and Curtis Streets are rich with options as is Writers Square and the Tabor Center.  Although November is not the best season, Denver hosts a lot of food trucks (http://roaminghunger.com/den/vendors/; http://foodtruckrow.com/) though they are not always obvious downtown.

1 Comment

Filed under AAA 2015 Denver, anthropology of food, restaurants

Christine Wilson Award 2015

The Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition is pleased to announce the 2015 Christine Wilson Award.

The award recognizes outstanding student research examining topics in nutrition, food studies and anthropology. Papers that propose new conceptual framework or outline novel research designs are especially welcome.

Guidelines for Submission of Your Entry:

  • Paper must present original, empirical research (literature reviews not eligible) undertaken in whole or in part by the author.
  • Primary focus must be on anthropological approach to food and/or nutrition.
  • Author (or first author for co-authored papers) must be currently enrolled as a student (undergraduate or graduate), or enrolled during the past academic year.
  • Papers should be no longer than 25 pages, double-spaced, and follow American Anthropological Association style guidelines.

Winners of the graduate and undergraduate awards receive a cash prize + a year’s membership in SAFN

DEADLINE: 31 OCTOBER 2015

Submit your paper to Amy Trubek via email (atrubek@uvm.edu).

Submission is open to AAA and non-AAA members. For more information, visit www.foodanthro.com/christine-wilson-award/.

Leave a comment

Filed under AAA, anthropology, awards

“Would you put oregano on your posole?” Lois Stanford on teaching “Food and Culture Around the World” and using New Mexico’s diversity in the classroom

Lauren Moore
University of Kentucky

This month, we hear from Lois Stanford, Associate Professor of Anthropology at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces, New Mexico. Dr. Stanford teaches a popular upper-level undergraduate course titled “Food and Culture Around the World.” In our interview, she describes how she uses New Mexico’s rich ethnic and culinary diversity to engage her students, the three-project structure of the class, and her film recommendations for the classroom.

If you would like to participate, or would like to nominate an excellent instructor for the interview series, please email LaurenRMoore@uky.edu.

Lauren R. Moore: Before talking about teaching, can you tell me a little about your research? I attended your presentation at the AAAs last year, in the food sovereignty session put on by Culture & Agriculture, I really am interested in some of the work you’re doing with seed saving.

Dr. Lois Stanford: Yeah, I’ve gotten really interested in it. I’ve done a couple of workshops with Native Seeds and I have a colleague here at NMSU who is a plant breeder. He works in traditional open-pollinated varieties of corn. I’m really interested in working with him, and with Native Seeds, to work with farmers and how they use [seeds]. I think there’s a lot of possibility for working with [farmers] in a way that would be useful to them. One of the things Native Seeds does is keep really good records on the seeds they are reproducing, but not enough from the farmers’ perspective. They don’t have the resources to look at how communities respond to them—you know, what kind of food they’re making, and what people prefer. I think there’s some potential there.

LRM: Tell me a little about this class, ANT 360: Food and Culture Around the World.

LS: Most universities have courses that are general education, because they want students to broaden their perspectives. At NMSU, we have classes that are general education at the freshman level, but we also have classes at the junior/senior level. These juniors and seniors are required to take at least one class outside of their college. It regularly draws from all over the college, and outside of Arts and Sciences. This class is also an elective for several of the majors in dietetics and nutrition and the College of Health and Human Services. Many students are studying dietetics or nutrition. They often go on to work in issues in public health or social work or dietetics. I just hope the class will get them thinking about these things more broadly, and will affect how they work and how they think about things, as well.

I try and get [students] to think about the relationship between food and culture, the way our culture shapes how we look at food, and how we use food to communicate and create social bonds—to really think about food differently.

Since this is a Hispanic-serving institution, I’d say easily half of the class is Hispanic. So, a lot of what we talk about is how much food has been an important part of their lives, their families, their identities. That’s something that I think really helps them look at food differently, too.

It’s a class I teach once a year; it fills within 24 hours after the registration opens up. It’s students who haven’t had anthropology; they’re also not students who are used to reading a lot of material, and they’re not students that have lots of experience writing. So, it’s kind of a class where I have to do a lot of teasing and cajoling. I’m using a new textbook, Gillian Crowther’s Eating Culture: An Anthropological Guide to Food.

Crowther coverIn the past, I’ve used Counihan and Van Esterick’s Food and Culture: A Reader, which I really like. When I teach anthropology students and graduate students, it’s a really, really good book. But the students in this class… Counihan and Van Esterick sent them right over the edge. They can’t read the articles and put it all together in a framework, so I’m using a different text for that reason. I have to structure things much more than I would with anthropology students or with graduate students.

LRM: Syllabi are such a great resource, but one of the hard things about consulting syllabi is that you don’t always have a sense for how the classes function day-to-day. I wonder if you could give us a picture of what one day in your class looks like?

LS:  I tend to be very structured. The class is run in a lab, so there are tables, and everyone is sitting in order. And then, it depends on what we’re doing in class… over the course of a week, I would do a lecture and would do a PowerPoint (I can’t lecture without PowerPoint). I have lots of pictures, and I tend to lecture standing in front of the slides and then asking questions and drawing people into the conversation. And then, those days are interspersed with films. When we have films, I usually give students a list of questions for stuff that they’re supposed to watch, and we then have a discussion after we a watch the film. We tend to alternate between something that’s more structured, like lecture with discussion and participation, and films that are followed by group discussions.

LRM: How do you have the course organized?

LS: First, I’m a cultural anthropologist. I know a lot of scholars may teach food from a biocultural perspective. I have the biocultural for one week at the beginning of the semester, and then we talk about subsistence and hunting and gathering lifestyles. Then, I domesticate food, and we talk about the fact that food is cultural, because most of what we eat is food that was domesticated. Then, I talk about food and history, followed by food and social relations.

Towards the end of the semester I move into talking about the transformation of traditional food systems. So, talking about globalization and the industrialization of food and the impact that has on us and on our health. We talk about some of the movements that can be looked at as forms of resistance to that industrial food system. So, talking about food and borders and identity, and then talking about local food systems.

LM: How does the New Mexican context shape the course?

LS: Because of where we are, [there are issues with] trying to revive the local food system and improve food security. It isn’t really food studies like Indiana University…we’re in a very poor state, in a Hispanic-serving institution, we’re in a public land grant institution, and we are in the middle of a drought. We have food production issues, we have a very low income and very ethnically diverse population… the context makes food studies much more applied.

I think a lot of people don’t really realize how important food is to them and to their own identity. In many other areas of the country, they might look at New Mexico and say, “Well, they eat Mexican food.” But, here in New Mexico, food is a really important marker of the geography of the region and your identity. When people start talking about those issues toward the end of the semester, they’re starting to loosen up a little, and they start realizing how important these things really are.

People who come from northern New Mexico think the food’s really different down here. We use more chile, it’s spicier, we use more oil; we’re influenced by Mexican food. Northern New Mexico is very “comida la ranchera,” it’s more peasant food, stews, and they just use red chile. The Mexicans who immigrate across the border, they make their enchilada sauce with red chiles but also with mulatos, anchos [dried poblanos], güeros [banana peppers] and different kinds of chiles.

All these kids recognize that the tastes are different. So the minute you start talking about ethnicities and boundaries and borders, you start asking, “do you use yellow cheese or white cheese?” “What kind of chile do you use?” “Would you put oregano on your posole, or would you put cilantro?” They realize how we use these things to create boundaries and differences, and it really is important to them. It’s a lot of fun.

WhitePozoleDF

White pozole with oregano.

Also, because here in New Mexico… I don’t mean any disrespect, but it’s not Vermont! We have kids that are Hispanic from northern New Mexico, who never considered themselves Mexican. They’re Chicanos, they’re descendants of Spanish. We have New Mexican border culture down here. We have immigrants, people from El Paso who are Hispanic and have grown up on the border, and have immigrants from Mexico. And I’ll often have Navajo or Mescalero [students], or students from the Pueblos. All of a sudden people start talking about their own experiences.

I think it’s really interesting for the white kids, too, because we have a tradition of farming in New Mexico, and many of them… they don’t have to go back far before they start realizing their own ancestry and their own foodways. They may be third or fourth generation immigrants. They don’t speak the language, they don’t have any ties, but often times food is that last thing that you kind of hold on to a sense of your family and who you are. They never really thought about it that way. They have a culture, too. I like to tell them, “those of us from the South, we have culture too!”

LRM: This sounds like it gets to be a really lively point in the course. Do you have particular activities that get these kinds of discussions going?

LS: One of the things we do at the end of the semester, when we’re talking about ethnicity and borders, is I have a PowerPoint slideshow, and we go through and talk about “What is a burrito? What do you put in a burrito?” Because in California, where I grew up, we have “California burritos,” where you put the rice and all of this stuff in them. And the students are like, “Oh, god! That’s disgusting!”

california burrito

California Burrito

Then I talk about posole, and ask, “Your posole, is it white or is it red?” They get into these arguments about what kind of cheese you’re supposed to use. Are you supposed to sauté the rice before you put the tomato sauce in it or after? At that point, they really realize how important these little tiny differences are, and it’s because we make them important. We assign value and importance to them.

They also do a series of projects in class. The first project they do is to write a history of a food, they have to pick a food and write a short history of it. The second project they do is an observation at a meal. They have to document how the food is used, what kinds of social values are being reinforced through the sharing of food and how it’s organized. The last assignment is an interview with someone with a list of questions I provide that focuses on someone either from their family or somebody from another ethnic group, someone who is an immigrant or who has grown up in a different food culture. It’s a narrative interview to look at how that individual uses food as a way of maintaining their ethnicity.

LRM: What kinds of questions you have students ask in that interview?

LS: Well, if somebody’s immigrated, students ask what kind of foods they ate while growing up? What kinds of challenges did they have trying to maintain those foods when they came to the United States? How did they find them, how did they learn how to fix the foods, who taught them? Do they still eat these foods? When do they eat them?

What we find a lot here is that when people assimilate, they don’t fix traditional foods on a daily basis. But for feast days, for Día de Los Muertos, there are tamales all over town. Everybody has to have tamales for Christmas, and it’s a really big deal whether you make them yourself, or if you go buy them…that’s considered cheating. That’s a really big deal.

A lot of times, the kids don’t realize how much of those foods are still a part of their cycle. It’s part of the seasonal cycle, not what they eat everyday. But when it’s somebody’s birthday, when it’s Lent, it’s really important that those foods are served.

LRM: Is there one assignment or one section of the class that students seem to enjoy the most?

LS: I think it’s probably the interview. I think that it’s often an interview they do with someone who’s a member of their family. So it’s often educational and also more rewarding. But it’s also towards the end of the semester, and I think that we all get a little loosened up moving ahead.

LRM: Is there anything that you have kept consistent throughout the years of teaching the course that really seems to go well every time?

LS: The three projects have worked fairly well. With the history of a food, they don’t have to go out and talk to people. There are so many websites now. I post a link to the food timeline, and the Smithsonian’s got a lot. They can get their feet wet, you know… start thinking about these things, but they don’t have to go out and interview somebody or do something that engages. So, I think that’s a good start. Then, the other two projects involve them in doing a little anthropology… one is an observation, and one is an interview.

LRM: Is there anything that you have tried and jettisoned?

LS: When I first started teaching the class, I moved very quickly into local foods and organics and alternatives. And, this is a generation of kids that have grown up at McDonalds, and most everybody shops at Wal-Mart. You know, and some of them are gardeners, and some of them have a very different relationship with food, but I feel like it’s very important to not be too judgmental, to not be too dogmatic, to lead people into thinking about these things as opposed to beating them over the head with it.

I also like to talk about the contradictions and the realities of our lives. We can’t all be pounding corn and making tortillas every day; we’ve got to do something else. And they may occasionally see me at Wal-Mart, picking up laundry detergent. I think that trying to get people to think critically and reflect on it, and to not be too heavy into the organic kind of stuff. That’s definitely improved my teaching evaluations.

And the text reading, too. I loved Food and Culture: A Reader, but it just didn’t work for that audience. I’m hoping that this one works better!

LRM: Do you feel like there’s anything you do differently with this group? While they aren’t anthropology majors, they are juniors and seniors. Does that change your approach at all?

LS: Yeah, in the sense that they’re older, they’re more mature. We often have students who are returning students, so they often have families, they’re parents. We have a lot of veterans, we have a long tradition of military service with students coming back to finish their degrees. So I feel like maybe one of the reasons I like the class is that although they may not be aware of the concepts and may not have had the anthropology, a lot of them have had world experiences. They’re raising kids, and thinking about these kinds of things in their own lives. They served in the Middle East and they’ve been exposed to other cultures… so they’re not anthropology students, but they’re grown ups. That experience is nice.

LRM: You mentioned that you use films. Do you have particular films that you’d recommend?

LS: I really like the… they are dated now, but the PBS series that was done on food, The Meaning of Food, that Marcus Samuelsson interviews and narrates. They’ve got three parts: Food and Life, Food and Family, Food and Culture. They do these short vignettes, so they’re thematically organized then you get to see these different cases.

I’ve shown Food, Inc. before, and thought that was a little “rhhm-rhhm-rhhm-rhhm” (heavy handed).

I really like an ABC News special that Peter Jennings did (it’s really old now [aired in 2003]) called How to Get Fat Without Really Trying. It’s about the industrialization of the food system. Very Marion Nestle-ish—how they convince you to eat more and you don’t even realize it. They’ve got some great quotes, where some of these advertising people are talking about how they changed the formula of cranberry juice so there’s no cranberry juice in it, but people can’t tell the difference! And they just say these things…. it really gets the students going.

A really nice film that’s on the Center for Urban Pedagogy website that’s called Bodega Down Bronx. It’s nice, because we’re so Mexican and rural and border here, it’s a nice cultural difference.

And there’s also a really nice film called Ingredients about local food systems. It’s organized around the whole annual cycle, with local production coming full circle. It’s very nicely done, and it really focuses on CSAs, locals, and organics. And it’s in Washington state, with white people in Birkenstocks and stuff. So we watch that and everybody really likes it, and then I say, “What’s not in here? What’s missing?” and they’re like, “There’s no Mexicans in here!” There’s no desert, except for maybe a short five-minute clip in Tucson. So people have the sense that it’s not… it’s really good, but how does it get extended? How do other people participate in it? But it’s a really nice film, I like it.

And, I use a series of films that… well, I’ve done work in Mexico on food as cultural patrimony, and so there’s a short film that Mexico’s tourism department did and then presented to UNESCO as part of their food as their heritage. And then France did one, and France presented it. And so we watch the two of them, and they’re very different because Mexico is presenting its indigenous heritage, the farming, and the land. And then France…well, it’s all Paris, it’s French and Parisian, it’s urbane and cosmopolitan, so they’re presenting a different national image. It’s a nice contrast.

LRM: For instructors who are developing a food-related course for the first time, do you have any thoughts or suggestions for things to consider?

LS: I think the syllabi that have been provided by SAFN are a really good place to start because you can really see how different instructors have approached the same topic. Somebody who has a background in nutrition or who has more of a biocultural background, there would be different elements that they would include, and the course would be organized in a totally different way. I think it would help somebody who’s starting out to see what the different options are. Play with the syllabus, and make it yours.

LRM: Is there anything else you’d like to add?

LS: In addition to the undergraduate program, we have a Master’s degree, and we have a graduate level minor in food studies. New Mexico is a really neat place because there’s so much really interesting fieldwork that the students can do right here. Some students have done stuff that is food security related, designing curriculum for a school or something like that, others have done projects that have been more like food studies. I had a students who did a MA project on an ethnography of the matanzas, which is the tradition of the ritual slaughter and roasting of pigs for a feast. I had another student do an ethnography of an old, Hispanic, border restaurant, interviewing and cooking with the sisters who are behind the restaurant. We’re in a really culturally diverse area, where there’s a lot of opportunity for students to do really neat research, even at the beginning graduate level.

LRM: Thank you so much for your time!

 

1 Comment

Filed under anthropology, Food Studies, new mexico, pedagogy

Christine Wilson Award

Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition
2013 Christine Wilson Student Paper Award

DEADLINE OCT 4!

The Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (SAFN) is pleased to invite students to submit papers in competition for the 2013 Christine Wilson Awards presented to outstanding undergraduate and graduate student research papers that examine topics within the perspectives in nutrition, food studies and anthropology.

Papers may report on research undertaken in whole or in part by the author. Co –authored work is acceptable, provided that submitting student is first author. Papers must have as their primary focus an anthropological approach to the study of food and/or nutrition and must present original, empirical research; literature reviews are not eligible. Papers that propose a new conceptual framework or outline novel research designs or methodological approaches are especially welcome. Winners will be recognized and presented with an award at the 2013 AAA meeting in Chicago, IL and receive a year’s membership in SAFN.

Students (undergraduate or graduate) must be currently enrolled or enrolled during in the past academic year (Fall 2012 to present). The text of papers should be no longer than 25 pages, double-spaced and follow AAA style guidelines.  For application details please the Christine Wilson Award page here.

Deadline: October 4, 2013

Leave a comment

Filed under AAA 2013 Chicago, Announcements, anthropology, awards, Call for Papers, CFP, Christine Wilson, Food Studies