Tag Archives: SAFN

SAFN Program Updates

A very timely reminder from SAFN program co-organizer Abigail Adams about events coming up this week!

This is your SAFN Programs Co-organizer for the AAA annual meetings, looking forward to seeing everyone at the incredible panels we have lined up and at the Distinguished Speaker, Award Presentation, and Reception (free food!), Friday, December 1, 7:45 pm. Our distinguished speaker this year is Paula J. Johnson, of the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. You can read about her work here. In addition to her exciting talk, we will be presenting our awards at the same event. You can read about the recipients here and here, then come meet them! Many thanks to Ryan Adams, Rachel Black and Amanda Green, for their work on developing our AAA program this year.

I want to encourage everyone to join us as well at the SAFN Business Meeting, Friday, December 1,  from 12:15 to 1:30 pm. This is a well-run meeting, with great colleagues and some real work to do. This is your best chance to not only have your voice heard, but take up a leadership role in SAFN yourself.

And, many of us will be interested in panels and events of the Culture & Agriculture (C&A) section. Here are the highlights that I have found:

Wednesday, November 29, 4:30-6:15 pm, 2-0670, panel, The Tourism of Food and Nature Matters

Friday, December 1, 4:30-6:15 pm, 4-1295 Networking and Mentoring in the Anthropology of Agriculture and the Environment

Friday, December 1, 9-10:15 pm, C&A Reception.

Best wishes for your work and travels in November until we gather in Washington, DC.

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More Food Panels, Papers, and Posters at AAA 2017

A week or so ago we posted a listing of the panels sponsored by SAFN at the upcoming meetings of the American Anthropological Association. It is a glorious list, of course, and if you are attending, you could probably build your entire schedule with that alone.

There are many more food and nutrition papers, posters, and panels on the conference program. If you do a search for “food” you will get a surprisingly large number of results. We requested that SAFN members whose work was not reviewed by SAFN send us information about anything they might have on the program. Those that we received are below…and the selection is inspiring! We will not have time to post more here, so check out the conference program for even more. If you are a SAFN member, remember that you can also circulate news about your presence on the meeting program by sending an email to the SAFN listserv. Let us know what you are up to!

Thursday, November 30

Abby Golub: New Plantations, Neo-Slavery, and Successful Incorporation: Towards a Framework for a More Just Food Production System, as part of the poster session (3-0530) “Gallery Session: Social Justice and Education,” 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM.

Abstract: New Plantations, a multi-sited, international collaboration funded by the Swiss Network for International Studies, considers migrant agricultural labor, race, and illegality. The project includes case studies in Italy, Switzerland, and Belgium. A primary goal of the project is to “develop a framework for more socially sustainable production regimes, and explore approaches that might improve difficult working conditions of migrants in agriculture.” My project fits within the Belgium case study. My goal was to understand life paths of people no longer working in such neo-slavery working conditions, and to understand how they achieved their positions. I specifically focus on South Asian, especially Sikh people in Belgium because they have often worked in agriculture and moved on to other jobs and even farm ownership. I argue that Sikh Cosmopolitanism, a compilation of traits such as openness, generosity, and positive associations with rural, as well as religious habitus, contributes to positive religious, economic, and educational incorporation both locally in Belgium and in transnational social fields.

Session: (3-0730) Famines and Food Crises in Africa: Causes, Consequences and Remediation: How Anthropologists Are Responding. Anita Spring (chair), Solomon Katz, Ellen Messer, Barrett Brenton, Zinta Zommers, John Lamm, Judy Canahuati, David Kauck. 2:00 PM – 3:45 PM

Abstract: Famines and food crises in Africa and some Middle Eastern countries bordering the Red Sea are created and complicated by war, political unrest, climate change, continued population growth, and economic factors. A chaotic decline in food resources for at least 20 million people extends east to west from Nigeria to South Sudan, Somalia, and Yemen, mostly due to political unrest and instability, with these four countries having the greatest severity in Africa and the world according to the UN. Other climate-related famine countries are in the Horn of Africa and include Sudan and Ethiopia, while political unrest affects food production and distribution in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (central Africa) and drought conditions obtain in the southern and eastern Africa (Botswana, Malawi, Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe), where prolonged and serious drought strains the economic and social capacity to cope with and develop new solutions in these recurring drought scenarios. Further complicating relief in many of these countries are the reduced expenditures from multilateral agencies of the UN and bilateral assistance from the US, UK, EU, and Japan. By contrast, China has stepped up to provide public- and private-sector funding and development assistance, but the magnitude, methods and results need to be studied to ascertain the impacts. This session examines from an anthropological perspective the causes, consequences, and their efforts for remedial and action plans developed by participating multilateral, bilateral and NGO agencies aimed at mitigating food and agriculture disasters, and for promulgating new solutions both political and technological. A major problem currently facing famine-relief programs is the uncertainty of UN funding, particularly affecting the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), World Food Program (WFP) and related emergency resources due in part to the proposed US under-funding for UN programs. This round table aims to summarize issues and remedies using the data from several perspectives. Questions to be addressed in this session include, but are not limited to the following issues: (1) How are anthropologists conceptualizing, identifying, and mitigating food-system disasters, using their long-term experiences in studying previous and recurrent calamities? (2) How do current political mishandling of agricultural production and distribution affect outcomes versus what happens if “more enlightened” production and distribution methods, as well as better marketing strategies and financial instruments are introduced? (3) Are any of these likely to mitigate the food crises, and if so how? This round table also considers new and innovative farm-managed methods such as conservation agriculture and carbon sequestration in soils, alternative food sources and better food storage, new financial instruments and index-insurance for farmers, and producer-friendly government policies in terms of production and distribution. The need for greater economic understanding of the food supply is a crucial and missing link between the planning which is often done by Big Ag economics, and the need for “Anthronomics”, that uses the insights and questions of anthropology and the methods of economics to address new solutions for food system problems.

Friday, December 1

Session: (4-1005) Anthropologists’ Retirement Accounts, Land-grabbing, and Deforestation: local and global impacts of TIAA’s agricultural investments. Douglas Hertzler, Marc Edelman, Sidney Greenfield, Maria Luisa Mendonca, Steven Heim, Quinton Robinson, Karina Gonzalez, David Kane.

Abstract: Many anthropologists have their retirement savings invested in the large financial services organization TIAA, which provides plans for many universities and non-profits. TIAA describes itself as “the largest manager of worldwide farmland assets.” The firm is a global leader in the surging interest in acquiring farmland that has occurred over last decade as investors have increasingly seen farmland as a valuable and potentially scarce asset in the future. Separately from its real estate investments TIAA also has investments in the consumption side of the palm oil supply chain, an industry often connected with deforestation and human rights concerns. TIAA prides itself in being a responsible investor and played a leading role in developing the Principles for Responsible Investment in Farmland. These TIAA sponsored principles remain controversial among and civil society organizations participating in the UN Committee on World Food Security which has developed its own more broadly recognized guidelines on land tenure.

Since the pioneering fieldwork of AAA past-President Walter Goldschmidt in California in the 1940s, anthropologists have been interested in the impact of farm ownership structure on communities and food systems. Brazilian researchers and social movements have been concerned that corporate investment in farmland undermines land access and control by marginalized communities and groups and it has been alleged that companies such as TIAA are circumventing laws that were intended to prevent large-scale foreign ownership of farmland through joint ventures with Brazilian companies with majority ownership. Further, some claim following national legal requirements is not enough to protect rural communities where land tenure is contentious. In the United States, family farm advocates are concerned that the growing scale of corporate farms harms rural communities and reduces farming opportunities for young farmers, immigrants, and farmers of color. This public policy forum moderated by anthropologists interested in the issues, will include representatives of family farm, environmental, and human rights organizations, as well as representatives of organizations involved in responsible investment. In addition to addressing the current situation, panelists will be asked: What can large institutional investors do to support the implementation of human rights norms and best practices in equitable access to land and collective land rights?

Willa Zhen: Chefs Need Anthropology: Critical Reflections on Teaching at the Culinary Institute of America, as part of the panel (4-1270) “Why Anthropology Matters: Making Anthropology Relevant and Engaging a Larger Public Audience through Pedagogy,” 4:15 PM – 6:00 PM.

Abstract: This paper reflects upon the author’s experiences teaching anthropology at the Culinary Institute of America. Founded in 1946, this institution has come to be known for producing some of the top names in the culinary and hospitality fields. Graduates of the Institute routinely top the “best of” lists in the culinary world; names like Anthony Bourdain, Duff Goldman, Cat Cora, and many others. It suffices to say this institution has a strong reputation – just not for anthropology. But as the food industry has come to deal with new social issues like environmental change, cultural sustainability, fair labor practices, the Institute has also had to reshape its curriculum. Anthropology has entered the curriculum in recent years, part of the Institute’s growing recognition of the need for students to be more than “just” chefs. This paper will discuss why it is important to teach anthropology in what are traditionally vocational contexts and how the discipline is uniquely positioned to contribute beyond traditional liberal arts classrooms. Culinary students, who in their kitchen training have been taught to follow orders, are challenged to think critically, to develop intercultural awareness, and to question why actions occur. Anthropology can play a role in shifting students from saying “Yes, Chef!” to asking “Why, Professor?” by training individuals to think beyond the plate.

Saturday, December 2

B Lynne Milgram. Activating Alternatives in a Transnational Trade: Social Entrepreneurship and Frontier Coffee Production in the Upland Northern Philippine, as part of the panel (5-0915) “(Re)Situating Social Entrepreneurship and Transnational Trade in the Global South: Actors, Agency and Alternatives,” 2:00 PM – 3:45 PM.

Abstract: While the fair-trade-certified coffee movement’s roots in social justice created advantageous terms for producers, its current perceived inadequate concern for coffee quality and uneven producer-vendor relations have given rise to entrepreneurial initiatives marketing “fairer-than- fair-trade” coffee. The latter’s practice moves beyond “corporate social responsibility” to champion transparency, high quality, and sustainability. By opting out of the certification system, however, such fairly-traded enterprises raise questions about how consumers can verify vendors’ claims and how to reward those effectively assisting producer communities?

This paper engages these issues by analyzing new northern Philippine specialty coffee enterprises that apply a “fairly traded” mandate to activate the region’s Arabica coffee production. I argue that while these “barefoot” social entrepreneurs (Max-Neef 1992) have established more equitable terms for their transnational Philippine-US/Canadian trade, the complexity of people’s subsistence needs and pre-existing socioeconomic relationships can challenge enterprise sustainability. By shortening commodity chains, paying higher purchase prices, and providing organic cultivation training and processing equipment, Philippine social entrepreneurs enable farmers’ engagement in alternatives to conventional and fair trade markets. Indeed by promoting small-lot coffee production, these entrepreneurs have established a distinctive terroir of place and taste. Yet, Philippine farmers’ lack of income diversity, independent rather than collective production, and fierce competition in which producers sell previously promised produce to another buyer can frustrate entrepreneurs’ efforts to differentiate their practice. Given coffee culture’s growing third wave, I argue that Philippine entrepreneurs’ timely initiatives can still resolve these push-pull tensions to yield an industry for, and more responsive to, stakeholders needs.

Sunday, December 3

Joeva Rock: “The So-Called NGOs, Some of Them are Just Killing Us”: Recipient Fatigue and Agricultural Development in Ghana, as part of the panel (6-0260) “Lives Spaces, Globalized Economies, and Consumption in African Contexts,” 10:15 AM – 12:00 PM.

Abstract: The African Green Revolution is an unprecedented attempt to radically transform the African countryside vis-à-vis commercialized agriculture. It is premised on the assumption that, when provided with education and opportunity, African farmers will purchase “improved,” higher-yielding technologies. In this presentation, I draw on 13 months of ethnographic research in Ghana on one such improved technology: genetically modified seeds.

Using interviews, organizational texts, and participant observation, I show how a growing discontent amongst bureaucrats, civil society, and farmers disrupts the African Green Revolution’s teleological logics of growth, modernization and development. I call this discontent “recipient fatigue,” a dissatisfaction with being subjects of NGO, donor and state interventions, many of which have had little positive impact. I first share stories from farmers in Northern Ghana, many of whom have had negative experiences with “modern” agriculture, and thus remain skeptical of future interventions. Some decide to opt out of projects and interviews, a momentary disassociation from a global development system that denigrates African epistemologies and expertise. Finally, I conclude by showing how Ghanaian food sovereignty organizations attempt to translate agrarian discontent into policy change and practice, with particular regard to seed and seed law.

Session: (6-0235) Categories of Remembrance and Forgetting: Itineraries and Sanctuaries – Itineraries (Part 1). Terese Gagnon, Carrie Emerson, C.Nadia Seremetakis, Hayden Kantor, Tracey Heatherington, Virginia Nazarea, Ann Gold

Abstract: Memory is in our heads, but it is also embedded in things, places, relationships and the senses. What happens when things are destroyed, people are uprooted, and sensuous engagements wane? Collectively, we explore how the valuable contents of memory are tied to webs of socialities, landscapes, and mythologies that call forth complex itineraries and sanctuaries. We query the ways in which emotions surrounding the forgotten and recalled, rather than representing a trauma/nostalgia binary, may most often be “both/and.” How is memory seeded, how is it ceded? In what ways are seeds portable altars of identity and place for indigenous peoples, traditional farmers, immigrants, and refugees, among others? When the seeds themselves are lost, is the opening of that sensuous portal to other times, places, and relationships permanently foreclosed? How does one re-member and re-emplace when faced with the erasure of landscapes of memory and enforced bodily forgetting in the context of various calamities and displacements? How are political economies, and the wide relationships they foster, tied up in all of this in the Anthropocene?

From dislocation of political refugees and traditional farmers to conservation of biodiversity and diverse agro-culinary traditions, we examine milieus and memorials where the past is re-lived, consecrated, or expunged. We consider how, under certain conditions, these subversive and pregnant sites may have the power to re-open or re-create alternant forms of sociality and “affective economies” that encompass humans and other beings alike. We delve into the nature of nostalgia, that journeying back into the memory of things, places, routes, and refuges that at once carry warmth and melancholy. The contributors look at how these associations are linked to temporalities and places that have the potential to be both “slippery” and “transmutable” through the performance of gardening, cooking, and commensality. Such acts are especially fertile ground, as they constitute a re-opening via the senses and memory that substantively alters the present physical/ontological reality. In these often strange journeys of estrangement and sometimes return, the material and the imaginary collide.

Session: (6-0420) Categories of Remembrance and Forgetting: Itineraries and Sanctuaries – Sanctuaries (Part 2) Emily Ramsey, Taylor Hosmer, David Sutton, Milan Shrestha, Melanie Narciso, Jim Veteto, Marc Williams, C. Nadia Seremetakis.

Abstract: How do landscapes and foodscapes, along with everyday practices of preserving or rebuilding knowledge and community across time and space become sanctuaries? How can embodied practices of memory and sensuous engagement call forth connections that bridge “transmission gaps” in the face of rapid changes in the age of Anthropocene? What new forms of sociality do individuals forge in constructing these sanctuaries of memory, and how can they re-shape the knowledge, identity, and even discourse surrounding the politics of food, climate change, and austerity? How does one emplace when (if) there is little left to enact? This panel seeks to delve into these questions, examining the diverse ways that sanctuaries of memory and practice confront the risk of loss and serve to rebuild connections to individuals, places, and times.

Food and beverage become a primary sanctuary and a productive site for memory’s maintenance, whether through the physical preparation of dishes or the value conveyed in commensality. Embodied aspects of food, whether in the preparation of Cathead biscuits, a regional Southern specialty at risk of dying out with the growth of the frozen biscuit market, or in the age-old preparation of mead, a practice revived among participants in the emergent ethnobotanical mead circle tradition of the southern Appalachian Mountains. Memory also confronts an ever shifting foodscape, maintaining connections to heritage and past ways of life, in both tomato festivals that dot the Southeastern United States, bringing farmers and suburbanites into conversation with one another, and among rural Filipinos who continue to produce Aslam Baliti, a slowly fermented sugarcane vinegar, against the many mass-produced vinegars lacking traditional complex flavors. Moreover, cultural memory intersects with and continues to shape action, for example, where Nepali memories of past flood events influences their perception of risk with glacial lake expansion, and how Greek citizens facing political austerity measures and increasing individualism react by enacting coffee shop sociality and preparing traditional meals for refugees. This session explores milieus where the past is re-lived, consecrated, or reimagined, creating sometimes alternant forms of sociality that bring together individuals in diverse localities and circumstances, creating sanctuaries , both fleeting and robust.

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SAFN Events & Panels at AAA 2017

The annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association is rapidly approaching. The conference will be held November 29-December 3 in Washington DC, mostly at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel. The Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition will be well represented at the conference. We have included here a list of the panels sponsored by SAFN, as well as some of the other SAFN related events that will take place during the conference. More details on some of those will follow in coming days, including information about additional panels and papers that SAFN members are involved in that are not included in this list (those sponsored by other sections of the AAA). We have also provided links in the list below to the conference schedule, so readers can read more about the panels and papers. Come hear the latest food and nutrition research from anthropologists!

Wednesday (Nov. 29)

Wednesday, 4:30 pm-6:15 pm

(2-0545) Ethnographic Perspectives on School Food: Education, nutrition and culture

Rachel Black, Kelly Alexander (Session Chairs), Yue Dong, Caroline Compretta, Emily Herrington, Sarah Stapleton, Jennifer Thompson (Discussant)

Wednesday, 4:30 pm-6:15 pm

(2-0670) The Tourism of Food and Nature Matters: From Agriculture to Meals, from Rainforests to Glaciers

Clare Sammells (Session Chair), Mary-Beth Mills, Thomas Abercrombie, Charmaine Kaimikaua, Teresita Majewski, Angeles Lopez-Santillan, Michael Di Giovine (Discussant)

Thursday (Nov. 30)

Thursday, 2:00 pm-3:45 pm

(3-0755) Taste and Terroir as Anthropological Matter

Anne Lally, Kerri Lesh (Session Chairs), Carole Counihan, Sharyn Jones, Daniel Shattuck, II, Amy Trubek (Discussant)

Thursday, 5:30 PM – 8:15 PM

(3-1250) Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (SAFN) Board Meeting 
Abigail E. Adams – Central Connecticut State University; Rachel E. Black – Connecticut College

Thursday, 6:30 pm-8:15 pm

(3-1485) Food and Politics: Shifting Economic and Cultural Practices in Global Contexts

Alice Julier (Session Chair), Christina Solazzo, Sophie Slesinger, Farha Ternikar, Greg de St. Maurice (Discussant)

Friday (Dec. 1)

Friday, 10:15 am-12:00 pm

(4-0295) Black Food Matters: Race, Food Consumption, and Resistance in the Age of “Food Justice”

Hanna Garth, Ashanté Reese (Session Chairs), Kimberly Kasper, Billy Hall, Yuson Jung, Andrew Newman, Psyche Williams-Forson (Discussant)

Friday, 12:15 PM – 1:30 PM

(4-0575) Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (SAFN) Business Meeting  

Friday, 4:15 pm-6:00 pm

(4-1185) Political Context of Local Food Movements

Leigh Bush (Session Chair), Ryan Adams, Amanda Green, Janet Chrzan, Madeline Chera, Eriberto Lozada, Brad Weiss (Discussant)

Friday, 7:45 PM – 9:00 PM

(4-1360) Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (SAFN) Distinguished Speaker, Awards and Reception 

Saturday (Dec. 2)

Saturday, 4:15 pm-6:00 pm

(5-1035) U.S. Food Matters in Policy and Ethnography

Abigail Adams (Chair), Victoria Benavidez, Dalila D’Ingeo, Preety Gadhoke, Derrell Cox, II, Mariya Voytyuk, Elaine Gerber

Sunday (Dec. 3)

Sunday, 10:15 am-12:00 pm

(6-0330) How Food Matters in Contested Sovereignties and Resistance

Jacquelyn Heuer (Session Chair), Nir Avieli, Sheila Rao, Brittany Power

Sunday, 12:15 pm-2:00 pm

(6-0510) Building the Big Tent: Anthropology and Interdisciplinary Work in Food and Nutrition

Kimberly Johnson, Susan Johnston (Session Chairs), Carina Truyts, Jane Waddell, Dillon Mahoney, Roberta Baer, Chelsea Wentworth, Kristen Borre, Solomon Katz (Discussant)

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2017 Christine Wilson Award Winners!

We are pleased to announce the winners of the 2017 Christine Wilson Awards. These awards are presented to outstanding undergraduate and graduate student research papers that examine topics within the perspectives of nutrition, food studies, and anthropology. Award winners each receive a check from SAFN and a free one-year membership in the American Anthropological Association and the Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition. Of course, they also receive fame and glory.

The award committee this year was led by SAFN Vice-President Amy Trubek.

The awards will be officially presented to the winners at the SAFN reception during the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association, December 1, 2017, from 7:45-9:00 pm, in Washington DC. In coming days, we will be posting more information about the upcoming meeting, so watch this space!

For now, congratulations to Sarah Howard, a PhD candidate in anthropology at Goldsmiths College, University of London and to Kate Rhodes, an anthropology major at Macalester College, in St. Paul, Minnesota, for the two winning Christine Wilson Award papers. Their paper titles and abstracts are below.

Coffee and the State in Rural Ethiopia
Sarah Howard

Although coffee is enjoyed for the material qualities of its taste, smell and stimulant effect, it is the social and symbolic aspects of coffee drinking that make it central to daily life in Ethiopia. Based on research in eastern Amhara Region between 2011 and 2015, the paper explores the buna ceremony during which coffee is prepared and served, and its role in the lives of rural government workers. Starting with an interest in the disconnect between the reach and control that the Ethiopian government is popularly supposed to hold over its citizens and the lived reality of low-level state workers who are charged with exerting this control, I realised that coffee consumption could be a useful lens through which to review received ideas about state power and hierarchy. While Ethiopian society is commonly portrayed as highly authoritarian with a vertical power structure, this paper shows, through the medium of coffee practices, a range of forms of sociality between government workers and farmers, encompassing closeness and trust as well as highlighting the material and social disadvantages faced by the bureaucrats, complicating the picture of a strict divide between state and society. The kin-like social relations that are built between state employees through buna drinking help to mitigate their vulnerability, as well as build a space for them to critically reflect on their position in ‘producing the nation’. This paper is thus a contribution to calls for attention to the ways in which material practices, such as coffee drinking, continually constitute the state as a reality.

Having a Steak in the Matter: Gender in the Buenos Aires Asado
Kate Rhodes

Asados have their roots in the romanticized culture of the Argentine gauchos, or cattle herders, where men, free from the confines of urban life, could express their masculinity through cooking meat outside over an open fire. These macho characteristics have reinforced the notion that asados are a masculine activity. In this paper I address why it is that women cook on a daily basis, but the gastronomic identity of Argentina is rooted in the single dish men traditionally cook. I argue that the culturally accepted deviation from the historically feminine kitchen space can be explained through the symbolic importance of male interactions with meat throughout Argentine history, the construction of a masculine meat narrative, and a media that sustains traditional culinary gender norms. I break the concept of a masculine meat narrative down into the three factors that work to define meat as male, mainly the physical characteristics of an asado that link it to the time of the gauchos: fire, cooking outdoors, and the primitive manipulation of bloody meat. I supplement a review of the literature on this subject with opinions and anecdotes from informants which illuminate trends in perceptions of masculinity from both men and women. I conclude that the recent push for gender equality in Argentina, specifically the rise of the Ni Una Menos movement to end gender violence, is mirrored in asado culture, as women publicly take to the parrilla.

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SAFN 2016 Distinguished Speaker Lisa Heldke

Please join us for the SAFN reception and distinguished speaker on Saturday, Nov. 19 at 7:45pm at the AAA conference in Minneapolis. This year our distinguished speaker is Lisa Heldke, Professor of Philosophy at Gustavus Adolphus College. Prof. Heldke’s work explores the philosophical significance of food, which she explores in her book Exotic Appetites: Ruminations of a Food Adventurer, two co-edited volumes Cooking, Eating, Thinking: Transformative Philosophies of Food and The Atkins Diet and Philosophy, and numerous articles.

lisa-heldke

The title of Heldke’s talk is “It’s Chomping All the Way Down: Guts, Dirt and Fundamental(ish) Metaphysical Concepts”. The following is an amuse bouche that will hopefully whet your appetite for the talk:

How are we to understand the concepts of individual, and of person, in the age of the microbiome? We are awash in news accounts of research into the microorganisms that live on our skin, in our guts and in the soil. We learn that humans play host to more individual non-human organisms than we have cells of “our own,” and that those organisms play vital roles in essential processes such as digestion. The deep interdependence between humans and our microbiotic “guests” has led biologist Scott Gilbert to declare, “we are all lichens”—that is, “multicellular eukaryote[s] plus colonies of persistent symbionts.”

But symbiotic “lichen personhood” tells only part of the story of what it means to be a biological individual. Another, crucial, part is this: our bodies may end up playing host to a set of parasitic guests who deplete our hospitality and sicken or even kill us. Parasitism is not an inessential, accidental, or infrequent occurrence. Furthermore, the distinction between parasite and symbiont is neither sharp nor static; today’s symbiont may be tomorrow’s parasite. A conception of personhood must not simply acknowledge but also absorb this feature of existence.

Taking parasitism to be metaphysically relevant and instructive challenges the dualisms that dominate western metaphysics, in particular the self/other dualism. The parasite, taken both literally and figuratively, calls us to refabricate models of personhood that have rested on this tidy division. The result is a relational ontology with teeth.

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Christine Wilson Award 2016

Announcing the 2016 Christine Wilson Award

This is an exciting award for outstanding student research examining topics in nutrition, food studies and anthropology. Exemplary graduate and undergraduate papers are accepted.

Guidelines for Submission of Your Entry:

  • Paper must present original, empirical research (literature reviews not eligible) undertaken in whole or in part by the author.
  • Primary focus must be on anthropological approach to food and/or nutrition.
  • Author (or first author for co-authored papers) must be currently enrolled as a student (undergraduate or graduate), or enrolled during the past academic year
  • Papers should be no longer than 25 pages, double-spaced, and follow American Anthropological Association (AAA) style guidelines)

Winners of the graduate and undergraduate awards receive a cash prize + a year’s membership in SAFN.

DEADLINE: JULY 1, 2016 [NOTE NEW AND EARLIER DEADLINE]

Submit your paper to Amy Trubek via email at atrubek@uvm.edu

More details about the award, as well as the cover sheet, are available here.

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CFP: Best Annual Food Studies Conference!

asfs-conference-logo_small-e1448987738449

Here is the call for papers for the best annual food studies conference in North America with the most confusing name. This is the annual joint meeting of the Association for the Study of Food and Society, the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society, and, just to confuse matters further this year, the Canadian Association for Food Studies. That makes it the ASFS/AFHVS/CAFS Annual Meeting, which is really fun to try and repeat to friends and colleagues. And to make matters even more fun, SAFN will be a sponsor this year (as we were last year).

All that said, this is a wonderful conference. There are generally around 400 people in attendance, so there is a lot going on, but not so much that you are overwhelmed. You can network easily here and meet all of your food studies heroes. This is an interdisciplinary conference, so you can discover a wide range of approaches to studying food and nutrition. There is usually great food too. Toronto promises to be an interesting city for this event. If you have research you want to present, or if you just want to meet food studies scholars, you should go. The CFP is below (in both English and French!). There are more details on the website. Be sure to scroll all the way down — there is also a CFP for the pre-conference below, which is aimed at students, post-docs, and new scholars in food studies.

ASFS/AFHVS/CAFS Annual Meeting and Conference plus Pre-Conference, June 22-26, 2016 (Version français ci-dessous)

The University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC) is pleased to host the Joint 2016 Annual Meetings and Conference of the Association for the Study of Food and Society; the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society; and the Canadian Association for Food Studies – the first time the three organizations have met together. The conference theme, “Scarborough Fare: Global Foodways and Local Foods in a Transnational City,” emphasizes the changing nature of food production, distribution, and consumption as people, goods, foods and culinary and agricultural knowledge move over long distances and across cultural and national borders. It explores the development of cities and their transnational marketplaces where new and old migrants, entrepreneurs and emerging migrant-origin middle classes settle in suburbs such as Scarborough, rather than in older downtown districts such as the historic Toronto Chinatown along Spadina. To understand global and local food systems, we must give due attention to migrants, whether from rural districts or from cities, for they have historically provided knowledge and labour necessary to feed societies, while also altering the foodways of long-time natives of the areas where they settle. We invite participants to examine the role of mobile people as workers, entrepreneurs, and innovators in agriculture, culinary infrastructure, and food preparation and consumption. Submissions may also consider the long distance movement of people, culinary knowledge, and foods as contributors to projects of colonization, sovereignty and creators of global inequalities. The conference will feature cultural events, art exhibits, and a banquet that highlight the diverse communities and cuisines of Scarborough and the Greater Toronto Area. Students and emerging scholars in particular are invited to submit proposals for a pre-conference to be held on June 21 and sponsored by CAFS.

http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/conferences/scarboroughfare/

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS:

AFHVS, ASFS and CAFS support scholarship and public presentation on a wide variety of topics at their conferences. For the 2016 conference, we are encouraging submissions in many formats. We especially encourage submissions that speak to the conference theme. Abstracts may be submitted by scholars, practitioners, activists, and others working in food systems and culture. Abstracts may be submitted and conference papers delivered in either French or English.

SUBMISSIONS AREAS INCLUDE BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO

  • Food Systems: local and global, past and present
  • Culture and cultural studies
  • Discipline-specific and interdisciplinary research
  • Art, design, and technology
  • Ethics, philosophy, and values
  • Food access, security, and sovereignty
  • Migration, immigration, diaspora and transnational community studies
  • Cultural, agricultural, and culinary preservation and innovation
  • Governance, policy, and rights
  • Pedagogy, food education, and/or experiential learning
  • Labor in the food system, production, consumption
  • Energy and agriculture
  • Health: problems, paradigms, and professions

SUBMISSION PROCEDURE:

Abstracts due: January 31st, 2016

ALL PROPOSALS MUST INCLUDE:

  1. type of submission (e.g., paper, a panel, roundtable, petcha kucha, exploration  gallery, etc.);
  2. title of paper, panel, or event;
  3. submitter’s name, organizational affiliation, and status (e.g., undergraduate, graduate student, postdoc, faculty, independent scholar, community)
  4. submitter’s e-mail address;
  5. names, emails and organizational affiliations of co-authors or co-organizers;
  6. abstract of 250 or fewer words that describes the proposed paper, panel, or event;
  7. indication of any AV/technology needs
  8. a list of up to six descriptive keywords/phrases for the program committee to use in organizing sessions and events

For roundtables: Roundtables are informal discussion forums where participants speak for a short time before engaging with audience members. Please submit a single abstract along with a list of participants. There are no formal papers on roundtables.

For panels: Panels are pre-organized groups of no more than 4 papers, with a chair and discussant (who may be one person).  Please include a panel abstract as well as abstracts for each individual paper. Conference organizers will make the utmost effort to preserve panels but they reserve the right to move papers after consultation with panel organizers.

For individual papers: Papers will be grouped with similarly themed topics to the best of the program organizer’s abilities. Please submit a single abstract along with contact information.

For workshops: There will be opportunities for a limited number of workshops, including kitchen demonstrations (please email culinaria@utsc.utoronto.ca to discuss requirements prior to application). Indicate if pre-registration is necessary. Please provide an abstract as well as a detailed list of organizers, resource and space needs, and any expected costs.

For pecha kucha-like presentations: A petcha kucha is a short-form presentation that comprises exactly 20 slides, each shown for exactly 20 seconds (using the automatic timer of PowerPoint or Keynote), for a total presentation time of just 6 minutes and 40 seconds. The goal is to explain one or two key ideas, rather than a complete research study or project. Presenters should think in terms of describing a narrative, a theme, an experimental direction, or another BRIEF notion.

For exploration gallery display and poster proposals: Graduate students, food scholars, NGOs, researchers outside the academy, artists, and other members of the community are welcome to propose works for the 2016 Exploration Gallery. All media are welcome, including installations, print and other visual forms, audio, posters, and other works of art and design. A limited number of screen-based submissions will be accepted.

Notifications of acceptance will be provided by March 1st. Attendees are expected to register by April 30th or they will be removed from the program. Attendees must have current ASFS, CAFS, or AFHVS membership at the time of the conference. The conference organizers regret that they are unable to provide travel support for meeting participation. They reserve the right to limit acceptance of multiple submissions by any one author. Space for workshops is limited and will be determined based on available resources.

Please note that all co-authors/presenters must register individually to be included on the program.

http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/conferences/scarboroughfare/

Please direct questions to culinaria@utsc.utoronto.ca

La Foire de Scarborough

À propos de l’assemblée annuelle et de la conférence

Du 22 au 26 juillet 2016, l’Université de Toronto à Scarborough (UTSC) aura le plaisir d’accueillir l’assemblée annuelle et la conférence 2016 de l’Association for the Study of Food and Society (ASFS); la Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society (AFHVS) et l’Association canadienne des études sur l’alimentation (ACÉA), réunissant pour une première fois les trois organisations. Le thème de la conférence, « La foire de Scarborough : les habitudes alimentaires mondiales et les aliments locaux dans une ville cosmopolite », met l’accent sur le changement qui s’opère dans la production, la distribution et la consommation alimentaires à mesure que les personnes, les biens, les aliments et les connaissances culinaires et agricoles se déplacent sur de longues distances et traversent les cultures et les frontières nationales. Il explore la croissance des villes et leurs marchés cosmopolites, où les nouveaux immigrants et ceux de longue date, les entrepreneurs et les classes moyennes émergentes d’origine immigrante qui se sont installés dans les banlieues, comme Scarborough, plutôt que dans les quartiers plus anciens du centre-ville comme l’historique quartier chinois de Toronto, le long de Spadina. Pour comprendre les systèmes alimentaires locaux et mondiaux, nous devons porter une attention toute particulière aux migrants, que ce soit dans les zones rurales ou urbaines, car, historiquement, ils ont apporté les connaissances et le travail ayant contribué à nourrir les sociétés, tout en modifiant aussi les habitudes alimentaires des résidents de longue date dans les régions où ils se sont installés. Nous invitons les personnes participantes à étudier le rôle des personnes mobiles comme les travailleurs, les entrepreneurs, les innovateurs en agriculture, en infrastructure culinaire, en préparation et en consommation d’aliments. Les propositions peuvent également examiner la circulation des personnes, de la connaissance culinaire et des aliments sur une longue distance pour leur contribution aux projets de colonisation, de souveraineté et de création des inégalités mondiales. La conférence présentera des événements culturels, des expositions artistiques et une réception qui célèbrera la diversité des collectivités et des cuisines de Scarborough et de la grande région de Toronto. On invite particulièrement les étudiants, les étudiantes et les nouveaux chercheurs à soumettre des propositions pour la préconférence financée par l’ACÉA, qui se tiendra le 21 juin.

http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/conferences/scarboroughfare/fr/home-fr/

DEMANDE DE PRÉSENTATION DE RÉSUMÉS :

La AFHVS, l’ASFS et l’ACÉA favorisent la présentation de travaux de recherche et d’exposés publics sur une vaste sélection de sujets à leurs conférences. Nous encourageons, pour l’édition de 2016, divers formats de propositions, particulièrement celles qui abordent le thème de la conférence. Les résumés peuvent être présentés par des chercheurs, des professionnels, des activistes et autres personnes travaillant dans les systèmes alimentaires et la culture. Les résumés peuvent être présentés en français ou en anglais, ainsi que les communications pour la conférence.

LES PROPOSITIONS COMPRENNENT NOTAMMENT LES SUJETS SUIVANTS :

  • les systèmes alimentaires : locaux et mondiaux, passés et actuels
  • la culture et les études culturelles
  • la recherche interdisciplinaire ou dans une seule discipline
  • les arts, le design et la technologie
  • l’éthique, la philosophie et les valeurs
  • l’accès aux aliments, la sécurité et la souveraineté alimentaires
  • la migration, l’immigration, la diaspora et les études sur les collectivités cosmopolites
  • la culture, l’agriculture et la préservation et l’innovation culinaires
  • la gouvernance, les politiques et les droits
  • la pédagogie, l’éducation alimentaire et l’apprentissage par l’expérience
  • la main-d’œuvre dans le système alimentaire, la production et la consommation
  • l’énergie et l’agriculture
  • la santé : les problèmes, les paradigmes et les professions

PROCÉDURE DE DÉPÔT DES PROPOSITIONS :

Date butoir de réception des résumés : 31 janvier 2016

TOUTES LES PROPOSITIONS DOIVENT COMPRENDRE :

  1. le type de proposition (p. ex. une communication, un panel, une table ronde, une présentation Pecha Kucha, une salle d’exposition, etc.);
  2. le titre de la communication, du panel ou de l’événement;
  3. le nom de la personne qui soumet une proposition, son affiliation organisationnelle et son statut (p. ex. premier cycle, deuxième cycle, postdoctorat, universitaire, chercheur indépendant, collectivité)
  4. l’adresse courriel de la personne qui soumet une proposition;
  5. les noms, courriels et affiliations organisationnelles des coauteurs ou coorganisateurs;
  6. le résumé, 250 mots et moins, qui décrit la communication, le panel ou l’événement proposé;
  7. l’indication de tout besoin audiovisuel ou technologique
  8. une liste comprenant jusqu’à six phrases ou mots clés descriptifs que le comité de programme pourra utiliser dans l’organisation des séances et des événements

Tables rondes : Les tables rondes sont des forums de discussion informelle où les personnes participantes s’expriment pendant une courte période avant d’échanger avec les membres de l’auditoire. Veuillez présenter un seul résumé avec une liste de personnes participantes. Il n’y a pas de communications formelles pour les tables rondes.

Panels : Les panels sont des groupes déjà formés qui ne présentent pas plus de 4 communications et comptent un président ou une présidente et une personne qui expose (qui peut être une seule personne). Veuillez présenter le résumé du panel ainsi que de chacune des communications individuelles. Les personnes qui organisent la conférence déploieront tous les efforts possibles pour préserver les panels, mais se réservent le droit de déplacer les communications après avoir consulté les organisateurs et organisatrices.

Communications individuelles : Les communications seront regroupées par similitude thématique au meilleur des capacités des organisateurs et organisatrices du programme. Veuillez présenter un seul résumé avec les coordonnées d’une personne-ressource.

Ateliers : Un nombre limité d’ateliers pourra être organisé, dont les démonstrations culinaires (veuillez adresser un courriel à culinaria@utsc.utoronto.ca pour en connaître les exigences avant de présenter une proposition). Veuillez indiquer si la préinscription est nécessaire. Veuillez fournir un résumé, une liste détaillée des organisateurs et organisatrices, des ressources et de l’espace requis, ainsi que des coûts prévus.

Propositions de présentations Pecha Kucha : Le Pecha Kucha est une courte présentation qui comporte exactement 20 diapositives, exposées durant 20 secondes chacune (en utilisant la minuterie de PowerPoint ou de Keynote), pour une période totale de présentation de 6 minutes et 40 secondes. Il vise à exposer une ou deux idées clés, plutôt que tout le projet d’étude ou de recherche. Les présentateurs ou présentatrices devraient songer en termes de description, de narration, d’un thème, d’une voie expérimentale ou autre BRÈVE notion.

Propositions pour la salle d’exposition et les communications par affichage : On invite les étudiants et étudiantes de deuxième cycle, les spécialistes de l’alimentation, les ONG, les chercheurs hors université, les artistes et autres membres de la collectivité à présenter des travaux à la salle d’exposition 2016. L’exposition accueille tous les supports, y compris les installations, les documents imprimés et autres formats visuels, audio, affiches et toutes autres œuvres d’art et de design. Le nombre de présentations sur écran accepté sera limité.

Les notifications d’acceptation seront fournies d’ici le 1er mars. Les personnes participantes doivent s’inscrire avant le 30 avril pour ne pas être retirées du programme. Elles doivent être membres en règle de l’ASFS, l’ACÉA ou la AFHVS au moment de la conférence. Les personnes qui organisent la conférence déplorent ne pas pouvoir défrayer le coût du voyage pour la participation à l’assemblée annuelle. Elles se réservent le droit de limiter l’acceptation de soumissions multiples présentées par un seul auteur. L’espace pour les ateliers est limité et sera déterminé en fonction des ressources disponibles.

Veuillez noter que tous les coauteurs, présentateurs et présentatrices doivent s’inscrire individuellement pour apparaître dans le programme.

Veuillez adresser vos questions à culinaria@utsc.utoronto.ca

http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/conferences/scarboroughfare/fr/home-fr/

2016 CAFS Pre-Conference Call for Proposals

For the Joint Conference of Food Researchers from CAFS, ASFS, and AFHVS

2016 Pre-Conference for Students, Postdocs and Emerging Scholars

University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

June 21st 2016

Cost: $30 (lunch and snacks included)

About Pre-Conference

The Canadian Association for Food Studies (CAFS) invites you to join a full day preconference event, open to all students, postdocs and emerging researchers (including new faculty, sessionals, and community-based researchers). The pre-conference is a unique opportunity to engage with like-minded peers, build your connections and networks internationally and across disciplines, share your ideas, and gain both theoretical and practical knowledge and skills of particular relevance to new researchers. The field of food studies is an active and diverse area of research with unique challenges and endless opportunities. This year’s pre-conference programming will focus on the challenges of researching in this diverse field, provide career guidance to emerging researchers in food studies, and include opportunities for participants to share their own research in the format of a poster presentation. The full conference event, titled Scarborough Fare, will be hosted at the University of Toronto, Scarborough campus from June 22-26th 2016. It will be a joint meeting of CAFS and two American associations: Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society (AFHVS), and the Association for the Study of Food and Society (ASFS).

Poster Submissions

This year the pre-conference invites emerging researchers to participate in the Research Fair & Poster Session. The session is an opportunity for burgeoning food researchers to have the space to present a recent research project, paper, or thesis with a 3 minute “elevator pitch” and poster. This session is designed to foster interaction and engagement in a casual setting, and to encourage networking and social connection. If you are interested in participating in the Research Fair & Poster Session, you must submit a completed submission form (attached or below) by Sunday April 17th, 2016 to cafs.preconference@gmail.com. See submission form for complete poster submission guidelines.

Registration

More information on how to register for the pre-conference and Scarborough Fare will be announced at: https://afhvs.wildapricot.org/2016-conference-Toronto-ON

Or contact us with questions at: cafs.preconference@gmail.com.

Appel à communications par affichage 2016

Journée préconférence pour étudiants et chercheurs émergents de l’Association canadienne des études sur l’alimentation (ACÉA)

dans le cadre de la « Scarborough Fare » de l’ACÉA, de l’Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society (AFHVS), et de l’Association for the Study of Food and Society (ASFS).

Université de Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

le 21 juin 2016

Frais d’inscription : 30$ (dîner et collation inclus)

À propos de la journée préconférence

L’ACÉA invite les étudiants, postdoctorants et chercheurs émergents (incluant les nouveaux membres de facultés, chargés de cours et chercheurs du milieu communautaire) à une journée préconférence. Cette journée sera non seulement l’occasion de réseauter avec des chercheurs issus d’une variété de disciplines s’intéressant à l’alimentation, mais aussi d’étendre votre réseau à travers le Canada et même à l’international. Vous pourrez y partager vos idées et améliorer vos connaissances tant pratiques que théoriques sur maints enjeux pertinents pour les jeunes chercheurs. En effet, le champ des études sur l’alimentation est actuellement foisonnant. La diversité des approches et des disciplines qui le traversent sont couplées de défis et de vastes possibilités. C’est dans ce cadre que la programmation de la préconférence sera axée sur les défis inhérents à la recherche sur l’alimentation, sur les manières d’y faire carrière comme jeune chercheur, et ce, tout en offrant la possibilité aux participants de partager leurs recherches sous forme d’une session par affichage. L’événement-conférence intitulé « Scarborough Fare » aura lieu à l’Université de Toronto au campus Scarborough du 22 au 26 juin 2016. Il s’agira d’une rencontre entre trois associations d’importance dans le domaine de l’alimentation en Amérique du Nord, soit une canadienne, l’Association canadienne des études sur l’alimentation (ACÉA), et deux étatsuniennes, l’« Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society » (AFHVS) et l’« Association for the Study of Food and Society» (ASFS).

Propositions pour la session par affichage

Cette année, nous invitons les chercheurs émergents à participer à une session par affichage. Il s’agit d’une occasion de présenter une recherche, une communication scientifique ou une thèse sous forme d’affiche et d’une brève présentation de 3 minutes. L’objectif de cette session est de favoriser les échanges de connaissances, les interactions informelles et le réseautage entre les jeunes chercheurs et les participants à la journée préconférence. Si vous souhaitez participer à la session par affichage, vous devez nous faire parvenir le formulaire de soumission ci-joint dûment rempli par courriel avant le dimanche 17 avril 2016 à cafs.preconference@gmail.com. Pour plus d’informations, veuillez consulter le formulaire de soumission.

Inscriptions

Nous annoncerons prochainement les informations sur comment s’inscrire à la journée preconference et à la « Scarborough Fare » à : https://afhvs.wildapricot.org/2016-conference-Toronto-ON . Si vous avez des questions, contactez-nous à : cafs.preconference@gmail.com.

 

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