Tag Archives: food studies

ASFS Student Paper Awards

Students! Check out these awards for undergraduate and graduate essays from the Association for the Study of Food and Society. These are great opportunities for fame and recognition. If you have been studying and writing about food and have an essay, you should submit it. A brief summary is below, along with a link to the web site with complete details on how to apply. The deadline is February 1, 2017.

The ASFS invites current undergraduate and graduate students to submit a paper for the William Whit (undergraduate) and Alex McIntosh (graduate) prizes, respectively. These awards recognize students’ contributions to the field of food studies. There will be one award each for an undergraduate student paper and a graduate student paper. ASFS welcomes submissions on a wide range of issues relating to food, society and culture, and from the diverse disciplinary and trans-disciplinary fields that ASFS encompasses. The author of each award-winning paper will receive:

  • $500
  • payment of annual membership and conference fees to be applied to the following year if student is not attending in the current year
  • a free banquet ticket for the coming year’s annual meeting or the following year’s if a ticket has already been purchased or the student is not attending the conference in the current year; and
  • the opportunity to present prize-winning papers at an ASFS/AFHVS conference. Winners who wish to present the year they receive their award must have submitted a conference abstract in that same year.

Please note

  • Authors are highly encouraged to simultaneously submit an abstract to the ASFS/AFHVS conference by the conference deadline. Conference organizers cannot add your paper to an already completed program; you MUST submit an abstract by the deadline.
  • Prize winning papers may be presented at an ASFS/AFHVS conference within two years of award. Those prize winners who submit a conference abstract in the subsequent two years, should indicate their award status (year and name of award) with the abstract.
  • Prize winners may also postpone their registration and banquet ticket use for one year following the award.

Deadline for Annual Submission (all required material): February 1. NO Exceptions! Electronic submissions ONLY!

For complete details, visit this site.

Leave a comment

Filed under anthropology, ASFS, awards, Food Studies

CFP: Feminist Food Studies: Exploring Intersectionality

Yet another call for abstracts that will no doubt be of great interest to readers of FoodAnthropology:

EDITED COLLECTION CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

FEMINIST FOOD STUDIES: EXPLORING INTERSECTIONALITY

What might a feminist, intersectional analysis bring to food studies? Intersectionality (Crenshaw 1989; hooks, 1992) pushes food scholars, activists, students, and community members to situate interconnected social identities such as gender, race/ethnicity, social class, age, body size, able–‐bodiedness, sexual identity and difference as these overlap through discursive power and social structures to shape food practices (Williams–‐Forson, & Wilkerson, 2011; Brady et. al., 2016; Sachs, & Patel–‐Campillo, 2014; Sachs et. al., 2014; Heldke, 2013; Harper, 2010; Williams–‐Forson, 2006; Inness, 2006; Thompson, 1996). Feminist food studies scholars have begun to take up intersectionality as a way of better understanding the cultural, economic, political, social, spiritual, relational, and emotional aspects of food and eating. Cairns & Johnston (2015) remind us that embedded within intersectional analyses, there are multiple femininities constructed through gendered food practices. Julier (2005) suggests that a feminist food studies needs to theorize women’s experiences of the interconnections between food consumption and production practices, particularly as the construction of difference and inequality are centrally located in the convergences of the social relations constructed through these practices (pg. 164). Moreover, others have identified the need to consider how women’s experiences of embodiment and identity overlap with their participation and labour in alternative and agri–‐food systems, through paid work and unpaid caring work or food provisioning, and through their engagement with public health nutrition and representations of food in relation to gender, race, class and the body.

Feminist Food Studies: Exploring Intersectionality aims to pull together current scholarship that engages with intersectionality, as theoretical approach, epistemology, methodology, or method, in the emergent area of feminist food studies. We seek to address questions such as: how might a feminist, intersectional framework enhance, enliven, and advance food studies? How might feminist intersectionality inform the movement for food justice in ways that bring to light the complexities of doing this work locally, nationally, and internationally? What might feminist, intersectional analyses of food systems and food 2 practices, bring to the mainstream food studies table? How do feminist food studies scholars differ in their pedagogical, methodological, and epistemological approaches from traditional or mainstream food studies around the world? What work has already been accomplished by feminist food scholars globally? What areas have yet to be addressed? In what innovative, creative, and radical directions might feminist food studies lead the scholarship of food, eating, and the body in the future?

Feminist Food Studies: Exploring Intersectionality, will feature papers that highlight current empirical research and feminist theorizing using an intersectional lens in the emergent area of feminist food studies. The Edited Collection will be international in scope and thus, we welcome a range of papers that examine food and intersectionality in all its complexity, broadly represented through the thematic areas of the socio–‐cultural, the material and the embodied or corporeal domains (Allen & Sachs, 2007).

Possible areas for submission include:

  • Intersectionality as a methodological approach or as method in food studies
  • Theorizing intersectionality through social identities such as race, ethnicity, gender, social class, age, sexualities, disabilities
  • Feminist Intersectional pedagogies in food studies
  • Femininities / masculinities
  • Embodiment including fat studies, or critical ‘obesity’ studies
  • Health as an embodied social practice
  • Ecofeminist perspectives and critical animal studies
  • Indigenous food systems and relationships
  • Material feminism
  • Food systems
  • Food security and food sovereignty
  • Women and agriculture / farming

Deadline for proposals: February 28, 2017

Deadline for full papers: June 30, 2017

Anticipated Publication: 2018

Please submit abstracts to: feministfoodstudies@gmail.com

References:

Allen, P. & Sachs, C. (2007). Women and Food Chains: The Gendered Politics of Food, International Journal of Sociology and Food, 15(1), pp. 1–‐23. http://www.ijsaf.org/contents/15–‐1/allen/index.html

Brady, J., Gingras, J., & Power E. (2016). Still Hungry: A Feminist Perspective on Food, Foodwork, the Body and Food Studies, in Mustafa Koc, Jennifer Sumner, & Anthony Winson, (eds.), Critical Perspectives in Food Studies, (2nd ed.), pp. 185–‐204, Don Mills, Ontario: Oxford University Press.

Cairns, K. & Johnston, J. (2015). Food and Femininity, London, New Delhi, New York & Sydney: Bloomsbury Academic Press.

Crenshaw, K. (1989). Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics, The University of Chicago Legal Forum, (140), pp. 139–‐167. http://philpapers.org/rec/CREDTI

Julier, A. P. (2005). Hiding Gender and Race in the Discourse of Commercial Food Consumption, in Arlene Voski Avakian & Barbara Haber (Eds.), From Betty Crocker to Feminist Food Studies: Critical Perspectives on Women and Food, pp. 163–‐184. Amherst & Boston: University of Massachusetts Press.

Harper, B. (2010). Social Justice Beliefs and Addiction to Uncompassionate Consumption, in A. Breeze Harper (ed.), Sistah Vegan: Black Female Vegans Speak on Food, Identity, Health and Society, pp. 20–‐41, Brooklyn, New York: Lantern Books.

Heldke, L. (2013). Let’s Cook Thai: Recipes for Colonialism, in Carole Counihan and Penny Van Estrrik (Eds.), Food and Culture: A Reader, (3rd ed.), pp. 394–‐408, New York & London: Routledge.

hooks, B. (1992). Eating the Other: Desire and Resistance, Black Looks, Race and Representation, Boston: South End Press.

Inness, S. A. (2006). Secret Ingredients: Race, Gender & Class at the Dinner Table, New York: Palgrave Macmillon.

Sachs, C., & Patel–‐Campillo, A. (2014). Feminist Food Justice: Crafting a New Vision, Feminist Studies, 40(2), pp. 396–‐410. http://jstor.org/stable/10.15767/feministstudies.40.2.396

Sachs, C., Allen, P., Terman, R. A., Hayden, J. & Hatcher, C. (2014). Front and Back of the House: Social–‐spatial food inequalities in food work, Agriculture & Human Values, 31(1), pp. 3–‐ 17. http://philpapers.org/rec/SACFAB

Thompson, B. (1996). A Hunger So Wide and So Deep: American Women Speak Out on Eating Problems, Minneapolis & London: University of Minnesota Press.

Williams–‐Forson, P. & Wilkerson, A. (2011). Intersectionality and Food Studies, Food, Culture & Society, 14(1), pp. 7–‐28. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.2752/175174411X12810842291119

Leave a comment

Filed under anthropology, CFP, feminism, Food Studies, gender

CFP: FOOD IN CANADA AND BEYOND

We recently received notification of the looming deadline (January 15, 2017) for this conference, which may be of interest to SAFN members and FoodAnthropology readers.

The Canadian Association for Food Studies (CAFS) will host its twelfth annual assembly at Ryerson University in Toronto, Ontario, May 27–30, 2017, in conjunction with the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Canada has immense food-systems resources and capabilities. Endowed with natural capital, informed by indigenous peoples and waves of immigrants, Canadian food systems continue to evolve in response to domestic and global challenges, such as food security, health and nutrition, food safety, climate change, and environmental degradation. Such evolutions contribute to shaping Canadian identities.

The 2017 conference invites a variety of submissions that examine how community, collaboration and complexity shape Canadian identities and Canada’s food systems and food movements. We are especially interested in submissions that examine food and its relationships with health, the environment, the arts and humanities, gender, indigenous peoples, education, security, public policy as well as how the roles of civil society, government, and business have an impact on food systems in Canada and the global context. Consistent with CAFS’ interests and mandate to promote multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary scholarship across multiple facets of food systems, we welcome a diverse array of submissions.
Presentation types:
– Standard Fare
– Themed Panels
– Pedagogy Matters
– Pecha Kucha
– Cookbook & Poster Displays
Submission areas may include, but are not limited to:
– food systems: local and global, past and present
– culture and cultural studies
– discipline-specific and interdisciplinary research
– art, design, and technology
– ethics, philosophy, and values
– food access, security, and sovereignty
– migration, immigration, diaspora and transnational community studies
– cultural, agricultural, and culinary preservation and innovation
– governance, policy, and rights
– pedagogy, food education, and/or experiential learning
– labour in the food system, production, consumption
– energy and agriculture
– health: opportunities, problems, paradigms, and professions
– business and management
Other Opportunities:
– Award for Distinguished Lifetime Achievement in Food Studies
– Student Paper Award in Food Studies
– Exploration Gallery
For details and deadlines (the earliest one is January 15), please refer to our CFP guidelines.
For enquires, please email to assembly@foodstudies.ca.

Leave a comment

Filed under anthropology, anthropology of food, CFP, Food Studies

What FoodAnthropology Is Reading Now, November 30, 2016

A brief digest of food and nutrition-related items that caught our attention recently. Got items you think we should include? Send links and brief descriptions to dberiss@gmail.com or hunterjo@gmail.com.

If we want to count the number of farms in the U.S., what should we count? Public policy and opinion thrive on analyses driven by big data these days, but it is increasingly clear that there are a lot of faulty assumptions behind the data. This article looks at the definition of farms and raises great questions about the definition of what counts. Ethnography might help…

While we are reading about farm and food policies, what might be the impact of a Trump administration crack down on immigration? Over at Civil Eats, Elizabeth Grossman provides this useful overview of a number of organizations and their views on this matter.

Also related to the incoming U.S. administration, Dan Nosowitz speculates about the candidates for Secretary of Agriculture over at Modern Farmer.

This may seem like something out of Sinclair Lewis’ novel “The Jungle,” but it appears that animal to human transmission of tuberculosis has become a significant problem in Africa. Anthropologist Lauren Carruth and her co-authors explore the issue – which includes drug-resistant strains of TB – in this article, which you can read here (if you subscribe to The Lancet) or here (if you do not).

The legal desegregation of public dining happened decades ago, but the reality of racial distinctions is still clear in fine dining all over America. In this elegantly-written piece, Maurice Carlos Ruffin explores his experiences of race and class in New Orleans dining and thinks about what that tells us about local and national culture. This article would really be useful in any number of classes.

Eating in diners has been an important part of New York City’s restaurant culture for a while, but that era may be coming to a close. In this essay, George Blecher explores what it means to be a regular in a New York diner.

With the recent death of Fidel Castro, it is interesting to think about some of the ways in which Cuba has been at the front of experiments in all kinds of social policies, including some related to food. In this article (which is a not recent, but we just read it), Christopher Cook looks at the rise of urban agriculture in Cuba in the wake of the demise of the Soviet Union and its support for Cuba.

Do black and white Americans have different culinary references? Listen to this interview with Donna Battle Pierce on KCRW’s “Good Food” about Freda DeKnight’s cookbook “A Date With A Dish,” which was a key part of many middle class African American household kitchens in the latter half of the twentieth century.

Are food deserts a result of bad supply or poor demand? In this article, Patrick Clinton looks at a recent study by an economist (which you can read more about here) that suggests that when poor people get more money, they do not choose higher quality foods. This is thought-provoking, but problematic, since it mostly leaves out any sense of history, culture, or taste. Low income people are hardly alone in the U.S. in making unhealthy food choices…demand seems like a weak explanation for that by itself. After all, where does demand come from?

Finishing on a lighter note (and inspired by an interview on KCRW’s “Good Food”), the Reverend Shawn Amos has a delightful series of blues performances available on his Youtube channel called The Kitchen Table Blues. He and his band appear in kitchens and near or in restaurants and perform blues. Sometimes food seems to be involved. Enjoy.

Leave a comment

Filed under anthropology, anthropology of food

Unlikely Eats: Paying Homage to Marge Gunderson in Minnesota

Frances Santagate Sutton

Going to Minneapolis for the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association? Readers of the blog who have never been to Minnesota may be trying to mix business with pleasure by visiting some of the iconic places in the Twin Cities area. I have never traveled to Minnesota but I associate it with three distinct cultural pilgrimages: paying homage to shopping in the same room as a roller coaster, paying homage to Prince, and paying homage to fictional hero, Marge Gunderson, of the 1996 Coen Brothers film, Fargo. With Marge Gunderson, the Coen Brothers gave us one of the most memorable heroes in modern cinema, beloved for her charm, wit, kindness, and bravery. Less notable but still noticeable was Marge Gunderson’s healthy appetite.

When we first meet Brainerd Police Chief Marge Gunderson, she’s being called to police duty at an ungodly hour. Her devoted husband, Norm, wakes up too, “Gotta eat a breakfast, Marge. I’ll fix ya some eggs.” She replies, “Aw, you can sleep, hon.” He sits up, “Ya gotta eat a breakfast…I’ll fix ya some eggs.” Their early morning breakfast together is a tender moment, as are all the moments shared between Marge and Norm in Fargo, most of which involve food. In one scene, Norm brings Marge lunch at the police station, a sandwich and drink from Arby’s. In another scene, they enjoy a hearty lunch together at a buffet restaurant where another police officer delivers Marge phone records relevant to the murder case.

Marge is “Minnesota nice,” whip smart, great at her job, and seven months pregnant. Apart from one case of near-morning sickness at the crime scene, we do not see Marge’s pregnancy affect her work. She never flounders, falters, or even flinches- even in the face of danger in the form of a man putting another man through a wood chipper. But she’s not hardened or gruff like the crime-fighting characters we’re used to. After she realizes she’s been given the runaround by a suspect, the first thing she does is stop at Hardee’s for a breakfast sandwich. There’s an entire scene dedicated to Marge sitting alone in her car, eating her breakfast sandwich, pausing at one point to smile – thus taking a moment of enjoyment during an otherwise stressful time. Like other Coen brother movies, Fargo marries elements of violence with elements of screwball comedy. But its key ingredient is its humanity, best exemplified by Chief Marge Gunderson and her Midwestern charm.

She may not be an anthropologist or even a real person, but as far investigators (of any kind) and food lovers are concerned- Marge Gunderson is the Fictional Patron Saint of Minnesota.  In fact, my trip to the AAA Annual Meeting will coincide with my pilgrimage to pay homage to her. “How?” you ask. I assume you’re asking because you too are interested in this pilgrimage. Although Marge is from Brainerd, the murder investigation brings her down to Minneapolis. While in the Twin Cities, she ends a call to her local police contact, Detective Sibert, with a request: “Would you happen to know a good place for lunch in the downtown area? … The Radisson… Oh yah, is it reasonable?” The Radisson in Minneapolis where Marge Gunderson stays and meets her friend Mike for lunch still exists in downtown Minneapolis. It is now called the Radisson Blu and it is home to a highly acclaimed restaurant. You can lunch there and yah, it’s pretty reasonable.

Leave a comment

Filed under AAA 2016 Minneapolis, anthropology, anthropology of food, film, Food Studies

What FoodAnthropology Is Reading Now, October 26, 2016

A brief digest of food and nutrition-related items that caught our attention recently. Got items you think we should include? Send links and brief descriptions to dberiss@gmail.com or hunterjo@gmail.com.

Sorting out the costs and benefits of fish farming in the Mississippi Delta is at the heart of this fascinating article from Brett Anderson that appeared in Landscape Architecture Magazine. The focus is mostly on the work of Forbes Lipschitz, who teaches at Ohio State University, using photography of landscapes to think about food production. This would be a useful article to use in contrast with articles that insist on the superiority of organic agriculture.

On a related theme, this interview with Dr. Jillian Fry, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future Public Health & Sustainable Aquaculture Project, addresses some similar themes, while focusing on different ways of evaluating the impact of fish farming. In fact, comparing these two articles ought to make us think carefully about how evaluations are done.

While we are reading about types of farming, here is a provocative opinion piece on farming as a modern occupation, a high-tech industry, a piece of history, a part of globalization, a lynchpin of communities, and much more. Clearly, farming is good to think.

Urban agriculture has been proposed as a way of dealing with a variety of problems in contemporary societies. As it happens, there is a journal, Urban Agriculture Magazine, devoted to the topic and you can read the latest issue for free. You may be able to read all the issues there too. Enjoy.

The 2016 Faces of Hunger Short Film Festival took place a few weeks ago, but the films that were shortlisted for prizes are still available here. These are all powerful, sometimes a bit hard to watch, but nevertheless worth watching. Not sure how long these will be available, so watch them soon.

Restaurant economics are either pretty simple or very complicated, depending on who you ask, but either way, the reality is that a lot of restaurants go out of business every year. This article contrasts the economics of fine dining with that of fast casual or fast food, showing the issues confronted by both.

Here is a manifesto on restaurants and race. Ranging from fine dining to fast food, the author raises questions and demands action on making restaurants and dining in general more inclusive and more culturally aware.

Did you know that cafeteria workers at Harvard have been on strike for the last three weeks? They may have reached a settlement, but it is nevertheless worth reading about what it is like to be a very low-wage worker struggling to pay health insurance premiums at the richest university in the U.S.

On a related note, you may want to know if slaves produced the food you are eating. This article provides an overview of a recent study that graded twenty of the largest food and beverage companies on their use of forced labor. You may want to put down your lunch while you read it.

Good news! You can keep going to the dentist even after you are dead. Sort of: dental anthropologists may dig you up and take a look at your teeth to figure out what you ate. Ok, maybe not you, but people in general. Neat stuff, from NPR.

To be an anthropologist is to be constantly amazed and fascinated by the thinking and behavior of humans. The rest of the world often returns the favor by being amazed by the fact that anthropologists are amazed by ordinary things. In this instance, Dr. Kirk French at Penn State is offering a course on the anthropology of alcohol (“Booze and Culture”) and this article from an alternative student web site explains it. You may want to go have a drink with some humans after you read this.

Leave a comment

Filed under anthropology, anthropology of food, Food Studies

Daniel Carasso Prize/Premio Daniel Carasso

Just ran across this prize announcement from the  Daniel and Nina Carasso Foundation. It seems like there ought to be some solid nominees among SAFN members! Note the deadline: October 23, 2016.

From the web site:

Feeding the world on a healthy diet while safeguarding the planet’s resources is a vital challenge. The Foundation believes that it will require the transition to sustainable food systems, and is convinced that researchers globally have a key role to play in designing tomorrow’s food systems and sustainable diets. Nevertheless, to do so, researchers need to break down silos between disciplines and tackle the various dimensions of sustainability in a more holistic and integrated way. This remains a challenge as most research is undertaken in disciplinary settings.

The Daniel and Nina Carasso Foundation created the Premio Daniel Carasso precisely to encourage such approaches and reward its practitioners. The  Premio Daniel Carasso is an international prize awarded for the first time by the Daniel and Nina Carasso Foundation in 2012, then in 2015 and from then on every two years. It is intended to reward and encourage outstanding scientific research into sustainable food systems and diets for long-term health. The Premio is worth €100,000 and the Laureate becomes the Foundation’s ambassador for sustainable food and diets.

The Prize is intended to give more visibility to a mid-carrier researcher and to help her/him inspire junior researchers to develop transdisciplinary approaches to study food systems and their sustainability.

For more information: see the rules of the Premio Daniel Carasso 2017.

Leave a comment

Filed under anthropology, awards, Food Studies