Category Archives: conferences

AFHVS/ASFS Annual Meeting and Conference, June 14-17, 2017

It is time for the annual call for abstracts from the best food studies conference in North America. This year it will be hosted at Occidental College, in sunny southern California. The call for abstracts and details, from the conference sponsors, follows:

Occidental College is pleased to host the Joint 2017 Annual Meetings and Conference of the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society (AFHVS) and the Association for the Study of Food and Society (ASFS).

The conference theme, “Migrating Food Cultures: Engaging Pacific Perspectives on Food and Agriculture,” invites us to reflect on and engage with the entirety of the Pacific region. The conference setting of Los Angeles, California, is a dynamic, diverse, and multiethnic global city that serves as a gateway, destination, and waypoint. Much of the food itself in California is produced in part by migrating workers and immigrants; indeed, the food scene in Los Angeles is the result of migrating food cultures. We use our conference’s location to invite participants to imagine and explore how the agricultural and food worlds throughout the Pacific mesh with environmental, social, cultural, historical, and material resources. We likewise invite participants to examine the roles of people, place, innovation, food production, and consumption, with attention to how these roles reflect and reinforce the social, economic, and cultural food landscapes of the Pacific.

http://oxyfoodconference.org/

Submissions

AFHVS and ASFS support scholarship and public presentation on a wide variety of topics at their conferences. For this year’s conference, in keeping with the theme, we encourage but do not require that papers, panel sessions, roundtables, and workshops speak to the theme. These sessions can be from practitioners, activists, and others working in food systems and culture. Submission areas include but are not limited to:

  • Food systems: local and global, past and present
  • Culture and cultural studies
  • Discipline-specific and interdisciplinary research
  • Art, design, and technology
  • Ethics and philosophy
  • Food access, security, and sovereignty
  •  Migration, immigration, diaspora and transnational community studies
  • Community studies
  • Cultural, agricultural, and culinary preservation and innovation
  • Governance, policy, and rights
  • Pedagogy, food education, and/or experiential education
  • Labor in the food system, production, consumption
  • Energy and agriculture
  • Health: problems, paradigms, and professions

Submission Procedure

Submission system opens: December 15, 2016

Abstracts due: January 31, 2017

All proposals must include:

  1. type of submission (e.g., individual paper, panel, roundtable, lightning talk, exploration gallery, etc.);
  2. title of paper, panel, or event;
  3. submitter’s name, organizational affiliation, and status (e.g., undergraduate, graduate student, postdoc, faculty, independent scholar, community)
  4. submitter’s email address;
  5. names, email addresses, and organizational affiliations of co-authors or co-organizers;
  6. abstract of 250 or fewer words that describes the proposed paper, panel, or event;
  7. indication of any special AV/technology needs;
  8. a list of up to six descriptive keywords/phrases for the program committee to use in organizing sessions and events;
  9. any attachments must include the last name of the submitter (i.e., LANGpanel.doc).

For individual papers: Papers will be grouped with similarly themed topics to the best of the program organizer’s abilities. Please submit a single abstract along with contact information.

For panels: Panels are pre-organized groups of no more than 4 papers, with a chair and discussant (who may be one person). Please include a panel abstract as well as abstracts for each individual paper. Conference organizers will make the utmost effort to preserve panels but reserve the right to move papers with consultation from panel organizer.

For roundtables: Roundtables are less formal discussion forums where participants speak for a short time before engaging with audience members. Please submit a single abstract along with a list of expected participants.

For lightning talks: Lightning talks are a short talk format. Each talk will last a maximum of 5 minutes and will be included in a session with other lightning talks. The goal is to quickly, insightfully, and clearly convey your point while grabbing the audience’s attention.

For workshops: Workshops are experiential or focused sessions where participants pre-register. Please provide an abstract as well as a list of organizers, resource and space needs, and any expected costs. We, unfortunately, do not have kitchen space for participants.

For exploration gallery display and poster proposals: Graduate students, food scholars, NGOs, researchers outside the academy, artists, and other members of the community are welcome to propose works for the 2017 Exploration Gallery. All media are welcome, including installations, print and other visual forms, audio, posters, and other works of art and design. A limited number of screen-based submissions will be accepted.

Notifications of acceptance will be provided by Wednesday, March 15, 2017. Attendees are expected to register by Sunday, April 30, 2017. For inclusion on the final program, at least one author from each submission must be registered as an attendee. Attendees must be members of AFHVS or ASFS at the time of the conference. The conference organizers regret that we are unable to provide travel support for meeting participation. Multiple submissions from an author are allowed, though we reserve the right to limit acceptance of multiple submissions by any one author. Space for workshops is limited and will be determined based on available resources.

http://oxyfoodconference.org/

Please direct questions to foodstudies@oxy.edu

 

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SAFN at the ASFS Scarborough Fare

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SAFN is a co-sponsor of the Association for the Study of Food and Society conference that will be held in Toronto next week from June 22-25. A number of SAFN members will be participating and we are organizing an informal gathering for SAFN members on Friday from 4-5pm.

Here is a partial of list of SAFN participants:

Abby Golub will present a poster at the pre-conference student day on June 21st. It is called: “How is Life After Fruit Picking? Precarity, Aspirations, and Social Mobility in the Life Trajectories of Hindi-Speaking Migrant Agriculture Workers in Belgium.”

David Beriss is participating in a roundtable on Sidney Mintz “A Sweet and Powerful Contribution: Sidney Mintz and Food Studies (A Multidisciplinary Roundtable)”. This is session C6 on Thursday, June 23 1:30-2:45. Beriss will also be giving a paper, “City in a Cup: The 2013 Public Drinking Crisis in New Orleans” in panel F2 “An Intersectional Approach to the Gentrification of Culinary Knowledge” on Friday, June 24, 10:15-11:30. Ashante Reese is the chair of this session and she will also be presenting on this panel. The title of her paper is “D.C. is Mambo Sauce: Race, Class, and Authentic Consumption

Rachel Black, Alyson Young, Mike Burton and Rick Wilk will give papers in session D1 “Food and Gender: Anthropological Perspectives” on Thursday, June 23 from 3:15-4:30.

Rachel Black will also be participating in the roundtable session L6 “Professional Development: What Do Journal Editors Want?”

Friday, June 24, Janet Chrzan is giving a paper in panel H1 “Pseudoscience and Nutrition: The Enduring Appeal of Magical Thinking, Dietary Fads and Nutritional Extremism”. The title of her paper is “Organics: Food, Fantasy or Fetish”

Amy Trubek will be participating in a number of panels:

  • Roundtable: Food and Agricultural research: What can French and American researchers learn from each other?
  • Panel G8 “What Does Income Have to Do With It? Making Meals and Socioeconomic Status in the United States”. Her paper is entitled “Time is Money: A Century of Changes in Cooks, Cooking Times and Eating Locales”
  • Roundtable 15: Changing Diets, Changing Minds: The Menus of Change University Research Collaborative
  • Roundtable: What can STS offer Food Studies?

Penny Van Esterik will participate in the roundtable C1.“Feminist Food Studies, Part 3 of 3: Toward a Feminist Food Studies” and L5. “Conversations in Food Studies: Working the Boundaries”

Helen Valliantos is participating in the panel B11. “The Politics of Milk and Maternal Health”. Her paper is entitled “Mothers’ Food and Health Perceptions and Behaviours in Ghana”

On Thursday at 10:15, Greg de St. Maurice and Rick Wilk will be on Roundtable B6, “Washoku in Jeopardy? The cultural economy and future of Japanese cuisine.”

If your name is missing, please contact Rachel Black with your details.

 

 

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Threatened, Forgotten, and Lost Foods

An intriguing call for papers for a 2017 conference in France:

Threatened, Forgotten and Lost Foods:
Causes and Mechanisms of Their Decline
14th – 21st centuries

TERESMA Conference
4-5 April 2017
Université Bordeaux Montaigne

Conference organizers : Corinne Marache and Philippe Meyzie

Far from being strictly linear, the life story of food products is composed of successes, of periods of spatial and also social distribution, of fashions fleeting and long-lasting, but it sometimes also includes mistrust or even fears which entail movements of retreat or even of decline. In marketing theories each product has a life cycle that is characterized by phases of growth, maturity and decline. Sometimes, even, certain foodstuffs, drinks or dishes disappear before reappearing later in a slightly different form. Today the tendency is for success and for re-launching or even exhuming products that have long been snubbed or despised, whereas others are threatened for ethical or health reasons.

The research developed by the ViValTer programme (La ville, espace de valorisation des produits de terroir) and now by the TERESMA programme (Produits de terroir, espaces et marchés, hier et aujourd’hui) which are behind this conference, have shown that local products – from the terroir – are undergoing a revival which is examining the nature of the links between consumers and areas of production and the way products are linked to history. Preserved meats, cheeses, fruits, animals, wines and other products associated with a geographical area of origin will therefore be of special interest within this scientific gathering which nevertheless aims at including all kinds of food and drink as well as different means of production. Whether real or artificial, the fame now enjoyed by all these once long-forgotten products cannot ignore why and in what conditions they fell into decline, came under threat or actually disappeared.

While history and social sciences in general have taken a lot of interest in success stories, in the products which have managed to become widely distributed, which have flourished in the long term, established their name and brought about the growth of economic sectors and companies or territories, it is also true that failure can be of historic interest as it allows light to be shed on economic, social and cultural changes within a period or a space. While these issues have sometimes been tackled in the study of certain agri-food sectors or in companies, so far they have not concerned in-depth research specifically examining their characteristics and what is at stake. In contrast with study devoted to analyzing the successful adoption of new foodstuffs (coffee, sugar, maize), to the well established fame of great wines or industrial products that are household names worldwide or to that of the conquest of international markets by renowned localized products, the theme of decline also possesses heuristic values when one takes an interest in a product, its history, its geography, its place on the market or it the role it plays in consumption. It will in fact help us to better understand how a foodstuff is situated within consumer patterns which may evolve, how a product manages to be distributed on a market before competitors arrive, how a local product widely known throughout a region little by little becomes a culture left aside. Studying the many processes involved in decline, from the latent threat to a foodstuff to its final disappearance, will also lead us to question food choices and their constraints, the directions taken by the agri-food industry and the policies that are implemented in this field.

Within the framework of the TERESMA program, which is interested in the links between terroirs, territories, spaces and markets both yesterday and today, this conference is therefore focusing on understanding the causes and the mechanisms of the decline of certain products from the 14th to the 21st century. True to the spirit of this collective international program, we are looking to bring together thinking from human sciences but also from law and economics in a historical perspective which will allow us to measure the changes and the importance of different historical contexts, and this will be based around three main axes:

  • The decline of a food product, of a range of products, a dish or a drink reveals itself in a variety of ways which need to be gauged and examined, in particular regarding their socio-economic and spatial dimensions: decline in consumption, retreat on regional markets or niche markets, dwindling production on shrinking territories, loss of reputation, name and identification, loss of knowledge about production methods, total disappearance, etc. Variations in scales of time and space will help to identify the mechanisms at work which threaten the production and consumption of a foodstuff or a drink, which may entail a significant drop, lead to total, or in some cases, only temporary, disappearance on the local, national or international scale. We therefore need to also ask whether a significant decline in the production or consumption of a foodstuff necessarily entails a decline in its notoriety or whether, on the contrary, certain products do not gain in stature or attractiveness from the moment when their production drops.
  • Another aim of this conference is also to reflect on the causes of decline. In order to do this we need to take economic changes into account: a raw material becoming scare, the loss of comparative advantages, competition from other typical or industrial foodstuffs, changes in agricultural practices, the shift from subsistence farming to farming which is commercial, aimed at production and globalized, with all its corollaries such as the need to make a profit, the resistance and inappropriateness of certain products or methods of production which obey productivity criteria. In the context of globalization which began in the 19th c. and which has largely favored the standardization of behaviors and tastes in food, we will need to examine the development of distribution and especially the arrival of mass distribution which, like the fashion industry, is in a position to influence the choices made by the agri-food industry, to impose itself as a trend setter, have also played a part in the disappearance (or “re-appearance”) of products. The socio-cultural logics which are behind the decline of some products should also be of interest to our speakers (changes in tastes and demand, changes in culinary fashions and use, changes in lifestyles and methods of consumption and cooking, the impact of medical discourse and ideas about health and well-being, consideration for animal welfare). Some of these different types of decline take place over the long term while others may arise from specific events: the effects of health crises and the ensuing need for precautions, which may then entail decisions not to consume certain products (offal …); weather events, environmental questions ecology crises ….; legislation, political decisions, treaties, taxes and tariffs … on a local, national, European and global scale. The role of the actors in this decline process must also be considered: could inertia, inability to adapt to demand and strategic errors possibly lie behind declines or maybe just hasten the speed of decline?
  • Finally, it also seems necessary to analyze the re-launching of forgotten products, some of which are enjoying a true revival, such as parsnips and Jerusalem artichokes, as well as some breeds of cattle, sheep and pigs, such as Kintoa pork from the Basque country. These products in decline also seem to be a resource for innovation, in stimulating the economic, touristic and heritage revival of an area. The decline and therefore the rarity and even the threat of extinction of these products bring them down to human-scale production and their consumption appears as a way to safeguard the wealth of our heritage where food and associated expertise are concerned. It becomes an eco-responsible act although it remains to be seen whether this is enough to reinstate these products in a sustainable manner. The absence of information about the revival of certain products thus offers another facet in the understanding of the causes and mechanisms of decline.

Propositions for papers should be sent to corinne.marache@gmail.com and phmeyzie@club-internet.fr. Deadline 1 October 2016.

They must include:

  • The title of your paper
  • A 10 to 15 line summary
  • A short biography

Scientific Committee
Isabelle Bianquis, Université François Rabelais de Tours
Giovanni Ceccarelli, Université de Parme
Marc Dedeire, Université de Montpellier
Jaroslaw Dumanowski, Université de Torun
Marc de Ferrière Le Vayer, Université François Rabelais de Tours
Stefano Magagnoli, Université de Parme
Corinne Marache, Université Bordeaux Montaigne
Philippe Meyzie, Université Bordeaux Montaigne
Isabelle Parmentier, Université de Namur
Raphaël Schirmer, Université Bordeaux Montaigne
Paolo Tedeschi, Université de Milan
Jean-Pierre Williot, Université François Rabelais de Tours

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Utopian Appetites

Received from one of our alert readers:

The 21st Symposium of Australian Gastronomy:

Utopian Appetites

Call for Papers

The 21st Symposium of Australian Gastronomy will be celebrated in Melbourne, Australia, from Friday 2 to Tuesday 6 December 2016. At this coming-of-age gathering of gastronomic scholars, writers and practitioners, we are looking with hope towards bright food futures with our guiding theme of ‘Utopian Appetites’.

The year 2016 also marks five centuries since the publication of Thomas More’s Utopia (1516). With its founding principles of desire, order, justice and hope, utopia represents a framework to think about gastronomy as both an imaginary ideal and a realisable goal for the future. The utopian theme encourages us to envisage the gastronomic project of eating well, bridging disciplinary boundaries, encompassing different spaces, practices, cultures and times.

Confirmed participants include:

• Darra Goldstein—founding editor of Gastronomica
• Robert Appelbaum—Uppsala University, Sweden
• Barbara Santich—food writer and emeritus professor, University of Adelaide
• David Szanto—Eco-Gastronomy Project at University of Gastronomic Sciences
• Stephanie Alexander—cook, food writer, and founder of the Kitchen Garden Foundation
• Josh Evans—Lead Researcher, Nordic Food Lab
• Annie Smithers—food writer and chef

We welcome submissions for original papers that explore real and ideal contexts of eating well – considered from historical, cultural, aesthetic, political, ideological, social, nutritional, environmental, religious, agricultural, philosophical, or any other perspectives. Australian gastronomy will be a feature of the programme but papers with an international focus are equally welcomed.

Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Gastronomy and the politics of hope
  • Ecological utopias of past, present and future
  • Utopian culinary histories
  • Cockaigne, Lubberland, and realms of plenty
  • Utopian desires and dreaming
  • Food and farming in utopian and dystopian literature
  • Utopian nature-cultures
  • Food gardens, pleasures and paradise
  • Governance, democracy and utopia
  • Food sovereignty, social experimentation and revolutionary hopes for change
  • Posthuman or postcolonial food imaginaries
  • Intentional food communities and new modes for living well
  • City and country connections and interdependency
  • Utopia and policy
  • Outrageous, improbable and impossible food futures

We invite proposals from academics and independent scholars, artists and activists, cooks and chefs, journalists and writers, food producers and artisans in the form of panel discussions, presentations, literary reflections, manifestos, performances and interactive experiments relating to utopia and gastronomy. Please send enquiries and proposals 350 words or less along with a 100-word biography of the presenter/s before 15 May 2016 to the symposium committee:

Kelly Donati (William Angliss Institute) – kellyd@angliss.edu.au
Jacqueline Dutton (University of Melbourne) – jld@unimelb.edu.au

Notification of paper acceptance will be sent on or before 30 June 2016.

The Symposium will take place at William Angliss Institute and the University of Melbourne with a daytrip by bus to Central Victoria. The cost is $575 per person ($400 for students). This covers all food, wine and excursion costs. Travel to Melbourne and accommodation is not included. The conference will run from Friday evening to Monday evening which will conclude with the banquet dinner. Tuesday morning will be dedicated to discussing the theme and location for the next Symposium.

In keeping with the tradition of the Symposium of Australian Gastronomy, please come with a spirit of participation, indulgence and hope.

To stay up to date on new information and Frequently Asked Questions about the Symposium, please see the website: www.gastronomers.net and join our Facebook group Symposium of Australian Gastronomy: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1653092668277952/

 

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Food Insecurity in a Globalized World: The Politics and Culture of Food Systems

This conference, taking place at Middlebury College on March 10-12, will be live streamed and recorded. The conference schedule is posted below. More information can be found here: http://www.middlebury.edu/international/rcga/international-conference/2016/schedule

 

Thursday, March 10, 2016

4:30–6:15 p.m.
The Role of the State and International Institutions

Moderator: Nadia Horning, Political Science

  • GMO Trade Negotiations as Proxy for Cultural Differences
    Patricia Stapleton, Director, Society, Technology, and Policy Program, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  • “Erst Kommt Das Fressen”: Food insecurity and food sovereignty in Greece
    Harry Konstantinidis, Economics, University of Massachusetts, Boston
  • Scientification and Social Control: Radiation Contamination in Food and Farms in Japan
    Tomiko Yamaguchi, International Christian University, Japan

7:00–8:30 p.m.
Cultural Adaptation to Scarcity

Moderator: Mez Baker Medard, Environmental Studies

  • The Politics of Adequacy: Food provisioning, entitlements, and everyday life in post-Soviet Cuba
    Hanna GarthAnthropology, University of California, Irvine
  • No Roi (already full): Dealing with food insecurity in contemporary Vietnamese rituals
    Nir Avieli, Sociology and Anthropology, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel

Friday, March 11, 2016

12:30–2:00 p.m.
Socially Constructed Vulnerability and Food Insecurity

Moderator: Julia Berazneva, Economics

  • Hunger and Land in Neoliberal Nicaragua: The collision of past and present
    Birgit Schmook, Senior Researcher, Department of Conservation and Biodiversity, El Colegio de la Frontera Sur, Chetumal, Mexico, with Lindsey Carte and Claudia Radel
  • The Causes and Consequences of Njaa (hunger) in the Household: Food insecurity and intimate partner violence within a Kenyan informal settlement
    Adam Gilbertson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Embodied Inequalities: Race, class, and food access in Washington, DC
    Ashanté M. Reese, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Spelman College

2:30–3:45 p.m.
Migration and Changing Foodscapes

Moderator: Joseph Holler, Geography

  • Seeds Sent from Home: Migrant farm worker gardens and food security in Vermont
    Jessie Mazar, University of Vermont, with Teresa Mares
  • Insecure Urban Foodscapes
    Colleen Hammelman, Geography and Urban Studies, Temple University

4:15–5:30 p.m.
War and Memory of Hunger

Moderator: Sandra Carletti, Italian

  • “Groveling for Lentils”: Hunger and Memory in Occupied France
    Paula Schwartz, French, Middlebury College
  • Bitter Greens and Sweet Potatoes: Food as embodied memory in rural China
    Ellen Oxfeld, Sociology and Anthropology, Middlebury College

Saturday, March 12, 2016

9:00–10:15 a.m.
Agroecology Access to Land and Seeds

Moderator: William Amidon, Geology

  • The Maya Land Rights Struggle: A Framework for Operationalizing “Foodways with Identity”
    Mark Chatarpal, Anthropology Department and Food Studies Institute, Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Food Security, Agro-biodiversity, and the State: The struggle to defend native corn systems in southern Mexico 
    Laurel Bellante, Geography and Development, University of Arizona
  • Agroecology and Food Sovereignty
    Margarita Fernandez, Vermont Caribbean Institute

10:30–12:00 p.m.
The Politics of Food Security

Moderator: Diego Thompson Bello, Sociology/Anthropology

  • What’s on Your Plate? Is global diet change the key to food and climate justice?
    David Cleveland, Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Governance and Power in Food (in)Security
    Molly Anderson, Food Studies, Middlebury College

12:30–2:00 p.m.
Summary

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The Manuscript Cookbook Conference

We recently received the following announcement of an upcoming conference at New York University that may be of interest to our readers.

The Manuscript Cookbook Conference, will be held May 12-13, 2016 at Fales Library and Special Collections, New York University.

The Manuscript Cookbook Conference will bring together professional and amateur researchers with an interest in manuscript cookbooks from many centuries. Tens of thousands of these documents are in existence, many now listed online in the ongoing Manuscript Cookbooks Survey database. Some have ended up in libraries and historical societies, while others remain in private collections. They are invaluable resources for scholars in a variety of fields, including history, economics, anthropology, nutrition, sociology, and, of course, food studies. Unlike published material, manuscript cookbook can honestly be called unique, even though many of them, especially those written after 1800, include recipes lifted verbatim from published sources. They can often offer better insight into historical diet, cooking methods, available ingredients, and taste preferences than printed works by professional chefs or cookbook writers.

There is no registration fee, but space is limited.

For the conference program, more information and registration, go to: https://wp.nyu.edu/manuscriptcookbooksconference/conference-schedule/

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Slow Fish

David Beriss
University of New Orleans

After the festivities of Carnival, we have Lent. Here in New Orleans, even if you are not Catholic, you are surrounded by information about restaurants with Lenten specials, Friday night church fish fries, and other fishy pleasures. Church leaders are called upon to clarify if things like alligator are approved for consumption during Lent (it is). There is some interesting history behind this, of course. But the fact is, this is a great time for seafood lovers in Louisiana. There is a lot of fresh and local seafood around most of the time, but at this time of year we are encouraged to eat it more than usual.

All of which is really just a preface to call your attention to an upcoming event that both celebrates and raises questions about the consumption of seafood today. Slow Fish 2016, organized by the New Orleans Slow Food chapter, will take place from March 10-13. This is the first time the Slow Fish event will be held in the Americas, after being organized every two years in Genoa. The event will bring together scholars, activists, fishers, chefs, and many others to discuss the challenges confronting the world of seafood today. And the challenges are many, from questions about sustainability, or the environmental challenges of fish farming, to how fishers can make a living and even thrive.

Having the event in New Orleans provides a setting in which local seafood ways and culture can be promoted. Restaurants are putting on special menus, there will be music, a fish fry, and a big seafood boil event on the last day. Check out the web site for more information.

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