Tag Archives: american food

American Food

There is a lot of innovative teaching being done in food studies and we like to feature it here whenever we hear about it. Last year we noted that Emily Contois’ students at Brown had produced an interesting blog about Food and Gender in US Popular Culture. We were interested to see what she might come up with next. This year it is a student blog on the idea of American Food. The project grew out of a class she co-taught with Professor Richard Meckel on “Food in American Society and Culture” at Brown University. The texts range from thoughts on immigrant foods, to the role of convenience foods, American food in cross-cultural context, and much more. Interesting contrasts—between health and indulgence, for instance—are explored. There is a pretty nifty Pinterest board to go with it as well.

Go check it out. And send us your student projects! We would be happy to share them with the world.

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Filed under anthropology, Food Studies, pedagogy

CFP: We Eat What? A Cultural Encyclopedia of American Regional Food

We recently received the following call for papers which may be a great opportunity for some of our readers. From akutaq to whoopie pie, there are some great things to write about here!

Call for Entries

We Eat What? A Cultural Encyclopedia of American Regional Food

A few years ago Natalya Murakhver and I edited They Eat That? A Cultural Encyclopedia of “Unusual” Food from Around the World, published by ABC-CLIO. The book, designed for libraries and classrooms, was designed to accessibly hook readers, middle school through college, into the study of food and culture through the “weird/wow” factor of foods with which they may be unfamiliar, keeping in mind that some of our most cherished foods (stinky cheese in my case) seem bizarre to others or bizarre when you take time to examine them closely (honey).

Based on that book, I am compiling a follow-up called We Eat What?, which will focus on regional foods in the US. We have a number of entries done or in revision from the previous volume but continue to seek contributors.

These are 1,000 word entries that cover the identity, history, cultural use, and nutrition of foods or dishes. Of drinks, especially coffee. Almost in every kitchen in America you can find a coffee machine (Rancilio Silvia espresso machine). They include a recipe either for the food itself or for something cooked with the food.

Contributors of two or more entries are provided a copy of the book on publication.  Last time we had strong contributions from both established and emerging scholars. I hope you will consider joining us.

For more information or to claim an entry, please contact Jonathan Deutsch at jdeutsch@drexel.edu and Ben Fulton at bjf67@drexel.edu. Deadlines will be rolling throughout the spring, but we hope to have a complete draft by June 1.

Thanks for your consideration.

Available entries:

Akutaq
Alligator
Barbacoa
Bean Hole Beans
Bear
Bialy
Boudin Blanc and Noir
Brains
Buffalo
Burgoo
Cannabis
Chaudin
Cheese Curds
Chislic
Chow Chow
Cincinnati Chili
Coddies
Coffee Milk
Deep Dish Pizza
Deep Fried Fair Food (Oreos, Milky Way, Butter)
Emu
Fluffernutter
Fried Green Tomatoes
Frito Pie
Frog Eye Salad
Fry Bread
Fry Sauce
Funnel Cake
Garbage Plate
Geoduck
Goetta
Gooey Butter Cake
Grits
Gumbo
Half Smoke
Hoppin’ John
Horseshoe Sandwich
Hot Brown
Hotdish
Hushpuppies
Jambalaya
King Cake
Koolickles
Livermush
Loco Moco
Loose Meat Sandwich
Muffuletta
Olive Loaf
Peanuts, Boiled
Pemmican
Pickled Pig’s Feet
Pig’s Ears
Po’ Boy
Poke
Polish Boy
Pork, salt
Red eye gravy
Reindeer
Shoofly Pie
Slinger
Son of a Bitch Stew
Sonoran Hot Dog
Spam
Spiedies
Squirrel
Steamed Cheeseburger
Succotash
Turducken
Watergate Salad
Whoopie Pie

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Filed under American regional food, anthropology, Food Studies, foodways

Interrogating the “Authentic” Local Ethnic Restaurant

M. Ruth Dike
University of Kentucky

I moved to Lexington, KY last August to start a PhD program in Cultural Anthropology. After a few months, I decided to ask my fellow graduate student Daniel, who grew up in Cholula near Mexico City, about where I could find “authentic” Mexican restaurants in Lexington. I wanted to know because I thought it would be nice to take my fiancé, Mario (who grew up in Zacatecas, Mexico until moving to the US in the 4th grade), to a restaurant that could remind him vaguely of his mother’s cooking (however futile that may be). Daniel obliged and even drew me a map of “Mexington” (no joke, that’s what Lexington calls it) with three “authentic” restaurants on it.

It was awesome that Daniel was so willing to show me places of “authentic” Mexican restaurants in Lexington but thinking back on it now, this wasn’t the best way to ask where to find less-Americanized Mexican food, or any type of international cuisine for that matter.

A few weeks later, we did end up going to Tortilleria y Taqueria Ramirez with a few other friends late on a Tuesday night. Below is a picture of my meal:

Burrito de asada chico and tacos de cesos y pastor with a glass of horchata.

Burrito de asada chico and tacos de cesos y pastor with a glass of horchata.

What even makes food authentic? Is it how long it’s been cooked in a certain way in a certain country? How far do we go back to look? 50 years? 1500 years? Are all the regional versions of couscous in Morocco just as valid as an imaginary “national” version of couscous? Is Neapolitan pizza more Italian than Sicilian pizza? Are we looking only at “authentic” Mexican food in Mexico or also in the US? Is Mexican food served in other parts of Latin America “authentic”?

When writing this post, I have to recognize my own privilege in being able to ask Daniel where “authentic” Mexican restaurants were in Lexington. Why don’t people ask me, “Where can we find “authentic” American restaurants in Memphis?” Am I any less knowledgeable of American food (having grown up in Memphis) than Daniel is of Mexican food? No, but we don’t expect Americans to make broad sweeping generalizations about a monolithic homogenous cuisine like we do for Chinese, Mexican, Italian, Moroccan, French, or other types of cuisine. We have regional varieties of American food but don’t realize that other countries are just as regionally diverse (thanks Olivia for this point). So maybe we should ask ourselves, would I ask that about American restaurants of my American friends?

And yes, I have had people ask me where to find good barbeque in Memphis (my choice), but the fact that they know to ask about barbeque because I’m from Memphis shows that they actually recognize America’s regional diversity. The way we use “authentic” in everyday life masks the regional variety of our local ethnic restaurants.

Why has no one ever asked my fiancé Mario (who has lived in Memphis since the 4th grade) about “authentic” American restaurants in Memphis? Is he less knowledgeable about American cuisine than I am? Nope. But sometimes I ask Mario to guide me through all of Mexican cuisine and culture. I realize now that it’s not fair to ask my international friends and family to represent an entire place and culture anymore than it’s fair for them to expect me to represent all of American culture.

There can be a complicated relationship between Americanized ethnic food and those from the culture that a restaurant might be trying to represent. Jiayang Fan, for instance, admits in The New Yorker that she loves General Tso’s chicken, but feels embarrassed about ordering it in Chinese restaurants. Mario loves Taco Bell. He doesn’t call it Mexican food but he does go there during the day.

Our friends and I thought the meal at Tortilleria y Taqueria Ramirez was delicious. I was impressed with the variety of meats offered and the distribution of ingredients in the burrito. Mario thought that his meal was tasty but that the carne asada in his burrito could have been a little fresher (we did go around 8 pm). I was reminded that Mario grew up having tasty carne asada at various weddings, quinceañeras, and baptisms throughout his life and had a much wider range of experiences with it than myself. Also that his mother is a cooking goddess.

Mario’s meal: burrito de asada grande and sope de asada.

Mario’s meal: burrito de asada grande and sope de asada.

We need to stop using the word authentic in a way that homogenizes ethnic cuisine when we ask our local Cultural Tour Guide** (ahem, friend) about local international restaurants. Instead of using the word authentic, you could ask, “What region do you think this Chinese (or Italian or Mexican or French or Pakistani) restaurant most identifies with?” “Are there any restaurants here that serve food that reminds you of home?” “What local restaurant has the least-Americanized food from your culture?” or simply: “What do you recommend around here to eat?”

Or you can use asking about “authentic” cuisine as a starting point for a deeper conversation about other cuisines. I think all too often we use our knowledge about sushi or pho to show our cultural capital without actually knowing much about another culture.

Eater.com editor Joshua David Stein says that, “there’s nothing more authentically American than inauthenticity.” Perhaps instead of searching for authenticity in ethnic cuisine, we should be searching for the complicated lived experiences of our international friends.

I’d like to thank Daniel V., David B., and Olivia S. for their insightful comments about this blog. This blog was inspired by another awesome article about food cultures written by Amy S. Choi as well as graduate seminars in the Gastronomy program at Boston University and the Anthropology program at the University of Kentucky.

*By international I mean any immigrants/visitors from other countries.

**The term “Cultural Tour Guide” was introduced to me by Olivia Spradlin, who heard it in a Gender & Women’s Studies graduate class at the University of Kentucky.

Ruth Dike considers herself a food anthropologist and recently started her PhD in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Kentucky. You can learn more about her here and reach her at mruthdike@gmail.com.

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Filed under anthropology, ethnicity, Food Studies, foodways