Category Archives: ASFS

AFHVS 2016 STUDENT RESEARCH PAPER AWARDS

We have received the following announcement from the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society. Please note that students cannot apply for both this award and the ASFS awards, which you can read about here.

DEADLINE: March 18, 2016

To encourage participation by undergraduate and graduate students and to recognize scholarly excellence, the AFHVS invites submissions to the 2016 AFHVS Student Research Paper Awards. Awards will be given in two categories: graduate and undergraduate.

An eligible AFHVS paper in the graduate student category must meet the following requirements: 1) be sole-authored by a student or co-authored by two students; 2) be on a topic related to food or agriculture; 3) employ appropriate research methods and theories; and 4) be an original piece of research. It is expected that the winning graduate student serve on the AFHVS student research paper awards committee the following year.

An eligible AFHVS paper in the undergraduate student category must meet the following requirements: 1) be sole-authored by a student or co-authored by two students; 2) be on a topic related to food or agriculture; and 3) employ appropriate research methods and theories.

Final versions of the papers must be submitted to the student paper award committee by 5pm (Central Time) on Friday, March 18, 2016. Soon-to-be-graduating students must be students at the time of submission in order to be eligible. A paper submitted to the AFHVS paper competition may not also be submitted to the Association for the Study of Food and Society (ASFS) student paper competition. Published papers or papers that have benefited from formal peer review (through a journal) are not eligible, however those under review are eligible.

Papers should be no longer than 20 pages of double-spaced text (data tables, bibliography, and notes may be additional) using Times New Roman (12 pt), Arial (11 pt), or similar. Papers do not have a particular required format or bibliographic style. Winners are expected to present their paper at the AFHVS conference within two years of winning the award, and a space in a panel is guaranteed. Each award includes: one-year membership to AFHVS, a $300 cash award, conference fees for the AFHVS Annual Meeting, and a ticket to the conference banquet.

Papers submitted to AFHVS should be e-mailed to Shawn Trivette (shawn.trivette@gmail.com). The email must contain the following information:
1. Paper title
2. Full name
3. Full postal address
4. E-mail address
5. Academic affiliation
6. Student status (i.e., undergraduate or graduate)
7. An abstract of the paper
8. A statement that the paper is not published, has not received formal peer review, and was not also submitted for the ASFS student paper award
9. The name & e-mail address of the faculty member or other academic supervisor who has been asked to verify eligibility.
10. Attached to the e-mail message the complete paper in MS Word, PDF, or RTF format.

Evaluation: The AFHVS Student Paper Award Committee will judge contributed papers on the requirements outlined above, relevance to the interests of AFHVS (see details below), and their scholarly excellence, including quality of original research, methods, analytical tools, rhetorical quality, and flow (see detailed rubrics below). The committee will select up to one undergraduate student and one graduate student to receive awards. Notification of awards will be made by April 18, 2016. Members of the committee for 2016 include: Jenifer Buckley, Jill Clark, Douglas Constance, Melissa Poulsen, Shawn Trivette, Evan Weissman, and Spencer Wood.

Opportunity for Publication: Based on the recommendation of the Student Research Paper Award Committee, the winning graduate student paper may be forwarded to the journal of Agriculture and Human Values for review for possible publication. Note that papers submitted for the student paper competition do not have a particular required format or bibliographic style. To be submitted for publication, however, papers will need to be formatted as specified by the journal.

Topics of interest to AFHVS: AFHVS is dedicated to an open and free discussion of the values that shape and the structures that underlie current and alternative visions of food and agricultural systems. The Society is most interested in interdisciplinary research that critically examines the values, relationships, conflicts, and contradictions within contemporary agricultural and food systems and that addresses the impact of agricultural and food related institutions, policies, and practices on human populations, the environment, democratic governance, and social equity. Recent award winning student paper titles include: “Cultivating citizenship, equity, and social inclusion? Putting civic agriculture into practice through urban farming”; “Problems with the defetishization thesis: The case of a farmer’s market”; “The rise of local organic food systems in the US: An analysis of farmers’ markets”; “Building a real food system: The challenges and successes on the college campus.”

For more information please visit the websites below.

Rubrics for assessing paper submissions:

Basic Eligibility Requirements:
1. Sole-authored or co-authored by two students?
2. On a topic related to food or agriculture, relevant to the conference?
3. Employs appropriate methods and theories?
4. Presents original research? (graduate students only)
5. Approximately 20 pages of text or less? (excluding tables, figures, bibliography)
6. Double-spaced and appropriately formatted?
7. Submission includes all required information?

You may download a pdf version of this announcement, along with a review rubric that indicates how the papers will be evaluated, here: AFHVS_2016_CFP_student_papers

Leave a comment

Filed under AFHVS, anthropology, anthropology of food, ASFS, awards

Food Studies Awards Galore!

FoodAnthropology recently posted the call for papers for the 2016 ASFS/AFHVS/CAFS conference, which SAFN is also sponsoring and which, if you are looking for an excellent reason to visit Toronto, you should attend.

But there is more!

ASFS (that is the Association for the Study of Food and Society) has a number of prizes and awards that you or your students might want to try and win. We recently wrote here about the ASFS Student Paper Awards. There are two, one for undergraduates and one for graduate students. These come with cash, ASFS membership and conference fees, a banquet ticket, and a chance to present at the conference. The deadline for applications is February 1, 2016, which is sooner than you think.

We also recently received notification of the ASFS Award for Food Studies Pedagogy. This awards a teacher of “food studies in any discipline who presents a course that uses innovative and successful pedagogical techniques to reach students.” If you teach any kind of food-related course, you might want to apply for this — there is a cash award, and of course fame and glory involved. Deadline: February 15, 2016. Follow the link for details.

ASFS has a book award for an outstanding book published about food in the last two years. Books that are submitted “should employ exemplary research methods, offer novel theoretical insights and constitute a significant contribution to the study of food from a scholarly perspective.” Got a book like that or know someone with one? The deadline is February 1, 2016. Again, follow the link for details about what to submit and where to submit it.

Finally, there is the Belasco Prize for Scholarly Excellence, which is for a peer-reviewed article that “exhibits superior research, a unique perspective and methodological approach as well as novel insights for the study of food.” This can be a journal article or a book chapter and has to have been published in the last two years. February 1, 2016 is the deadline and the link will provide you with more details about submissions.

Past award winners for all of these are available here. There are several anthropologists among them, including some SAFN members. It would be great to see more SAFN winners. Why not you?

1 Comment

Filed under anthropology, ASFS, awards, Food Studies

CFP: Best Annual Food Studies Conference!

asfs-conference-logo_small-e1448987738449

Here is the call for papers for the best annual food studies conference in North America with the most confusing name. This is the annual joint meeting of the Association for the Study of Food and Society, the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society, and, just to confuse matters further this year, the Canadian Association for Food Studies. That makes it the ASFS/AFHVS/CAFS Annual Meeting, which is really fun to try and repeat to friends and colleagues. And to make matters even more fun, SAFN will be a sponsor this year (as we were last year).

All that said, this is a wonderful conference. There are generally around 400 people in attendance, so there is a lot going on, but not so much that you are overwhelmed. You can network easily here and meet all of your food studies heroes. This is an interdisciplinary conference, so you can discover a wide range of approaches to studying food and nutrition. There is usually great food too. Toronto promises to be an interesting city for this event. If you have research you want to present, or if you just want to meet food studies scholars, you should go. The CFP is below (in both English and French!). There are more details on the website. Be sure to scroll all the way down — there is also a CFP for the pre-conference below, which is aimed at students, post-docs, and new scholars in food studies.

ASFS/AFHVS/CAFS Annual Meeting and Conference plus Pre-Conference, June 22-26, 2016 (Version français ci-dessous)

The University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC) is pleased to host the Joint 2016 Annual Meetings and Conference of the Association for the Study of Food and Society; the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society; and the Canadian Association for Food Studies – the first time the three organizations have met together. The conference theme, “Scarborough Fare: Global Foodways and Local Foods in a Transnational City,” emphasizes the changing nature of food production, distribution, and consumption as people, goods, foods and culinary and agricultural knowledge move over long distances and across cultural and national borders. It explores the development of cities and their transnational marketplaces where new and old migrants, entrepreneurs and emerging migrant-origin middle classes settle in suburbs such as Scarborough, rather than in older downtown districts such as the historic Toronto Chinatown along Spadina. To understand global and local food systems, we must give due attention to migrants, whether from rural districts or from cities, for they have historically provided knowledge and labour necessary to feed societies, while also altering the foodways of long-time natives of the areas where they settle. We invite participants to examine the role of mobile people as workers, entrepreneurs, and innovators in agriculture, culinary infrastructure, and food preparation and consumption. Submissions may also consider the long distance movement of people, culinary knowledge, and foods as contributors to projects of colonization, sovereignty and creators of global inequalities. The conference will feature cultural events, art exhibits, and a banquet that highlight the diverse communities and cuisines of Scarborough and the Greater Toronto Area. Students and emerging scholars in particular are invited to submit proposals for a pre-conference to be held on June 21 and sponsored by CAFS.

http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/conferences/scarboroughfare/

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS:

AFHVS, ASFS and CAFS support scholarship and public presentation on a wide variety of topics at their conferences. For the 2016 conference, we are encouraging submissions in many formats. We especially encourage submissions that speak to the conference theme. Abstracts may be submitted by scholars, practitioners, activists, and others working in food systems and culture. Abstracts may be submitted and conference papers delivered in either French or English.

SUBMISSIONS AREAS INCLUDE BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO

  • Food Systems: local and global, past and present
  • Culture and cultural studies
  • Discipline-specific and interdisciplinary research
  • Art, design, and technology
  • Ethics, philosophy, and values
  • Food access, security, and sovereignty
  • Migration, immigration, diaspora and transnational community studies
  • Cultural, agricultural, and culinary preservation and innovation
  • Governance, policy, and rights
  • Pedagogy, food education, and/or experiential learning
  • Labor in the food system, production, consumption
  • Energy and agriculture
  • Health: problems, paradigms, and professions

SUBMISSION PROCEDURE:

Abstracts due: January 31st, 2016

ALL PROPOSALS MUST INCLUDE:

  1. type of submission (e.g., paper, a panel, roundtable, petcha kucha, exploration  gallery, etc.);
  2. title of paper, panel, or event;
  3. submitter’s name, organizational affiliation, and status (e.g., undergraduate, graduate student, postdoc, faculty, independent scholar, community)
  4. submitter’s e-mail address;
  5. names, emails and organizational affiliations of co-authors or co-organizers;
  6. abstract of 250 or fewer words that describes the proposed paper, panel, or event;
  7. indication of any AV/technology needs
  8. a list of up to six descriptive keywords/phrases for the program committee to use in organizing sessions and events

For roundtables: Roundtables are informal discussion forums where participants speak for a short time before engaging with audience members. Please submit a single abstract along with a list of participants. There are no formal papers on roundtables.

For panels: Panels are pre-organized groups of no more than 4 papers, with a chair and discussant (who may be one person).  Please include a panel abstract as well as abstracts for each individual paper. Conference organizers will make the utmost effort to preserve panels but they reserve the right to move papers after consultation with panel organizers.

For individual papers: Papers will be grouped with similarly themed topics to the best of the program organizer’s abilities. Please submit a single abstract along with contact information.

For workshops: There will be opportunities for a limited number of workshops, including kitchen demonstrations (please email culinaria@utsc.utoronto.ca to discuss requirements prior to application). Indicate if pre-registration is necessary. Please provide an abstract as well as a detailed list of organizers, resource and space needs, and any expected costs.

For pecha kucha-like presentations: A petcha kucha is a short-form presentation that comprises exactly 20 slides, each shown for exactly 20 seconds (using the automatic timer of PowerPoint or Keynote), for a total presentation time of just 6 minutes and 40 seconds. The goal is to explain one or two key ideas, rather than a complete research study or project. Presenters should think in terms of describing a narrative, a theme, an experimental direction, or another BRIEF notion.

For exploration gallery display and poster proposals: Graduate students, food scholars, NGOs, researchers outside the academy, artists, and other members of the community are welcome to propose works for the 2016 Exploration Gallery. All media are welcome, including installations, print and other visual forms, audio, posters, and other works of art and design. A limited number of screen-based submissions will be accepted.

Notifications of acceptance will be provided by March 1st. Attendees are expected to register by April 30th or they will be removed from the program. Attendees must have current ASFS, CAFS, or AFHVS membership at the time of the conference. The conference organizers regret that they are unable to provide travel support for meeting participation. They reserve the right to limit acceptance of multiple submissions by any one author. Space for workshops is limited and will be determined based on available resources.

Please note that all co-authors/presenters must register individually to be included on the program.

http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/conferences/scarboroughfare/

Please direct questions to culinaria@utsc.utoronto.ca

La Foire de Scarborough

À propos de l’assemblée annuelle et de la conférence

Du 22 au 26 juillet 2016, l’Université de Toronto à Scarborough (UTSC) aura le plaisir d’accueillir l’assemblée annuelle et la conférence 2016 de l’Association for the Study of Food and Society (ASFS); la Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society (AFHVS) et l’Association canadienne des études sur l’alimentation (ACÉA), réunissant pour une première fois les trois organisations. Le thème de la conférence, « La foire de Scarborough : les habitudes alimentaires mondiales et les aliments locaux dans une ville cosmopolite », met l’accent sur le changement qui s’opère dans la production, la distribution et la consommation alimentaires à mesure que les personnes, les biens, les aliments et les connaissances culinaires et agricoles se déplacent sur de longues distances et traversent les cultures et les frontières nationales. Il explore la croissance des villes et leurs marchés cosmopolites, où les nouveaux immigrants et ceux de longue date, les entrepreneurs et les classes moyennes émergentes d’origine immigrante qui se sont installés dans les banlieues, comme Scarborough, plutôt que dans les quartiers plus anciens du centre-ville comme l’historique quartier chinois de Toronto, le long de Spadina. Pour comprendre les systèmes alimentaires locaux et mondiaux, nous devons porter une attention toute particulière aux migrants, que ce soit dans les zones rurales ou urbaines, car, historiquement, ils ont apporté les connaissances et le travail ayant contribué à nourrir les sociétés, tout en modifiant aussi les habitudes alimentaires des résidents de longue date dans les régions où ils se sont installés. Nous invitons les personnes participantes à étudier le rôle des personnes mobiles comme les travailleurs, les entrepreneurs, les innovateurs en agriculture, en infrastructure culinaire, en préparation et en consommation d’aliments. Les propositions peuvent également examiner la circulation des personnes, de la connaissance culinaire et des aliments sur une longue distance pour leur contribution aux projets de colonisation, de souveraineté et de création des inégalités mondiales. La conférence présentera des événements culturels, des expositions artistiques et une réception qui célèbrera la diversité des collectivités et des cuisines de Scarborough et de la grande région de Toronto. On invite particulièrement les étudiants, les étudiantes et les nouveaux chercheurs à soumettre des propositions pour la préconférence financée par l’ACÉA, qui se tiendra le 21 juin.

http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/conferences/scarboroughfare/fr/home-fr/

DEMANDE DE PRÉSENTATION DE RÉSUMÉS :

La AFHVS, l’ASFS et l’ACÉA favorisent la présentation de travaux de recherche et d’exposés publics sur une vaste sélection de sujets à leurs conférences. Nous encourageons, pour l’édition de 2016, divers formats de propositions, particulièrement celles qui abordent le thème de la conférence. Les résumés peuvent être présentés par des chercheurs, des professionnels, des activistes et autres personnes travaillant dans les systèmes alimentaires et la culture. Les résumés peuvent être présentés en français ou en anglais, ainsi que les communications pour la conférence.

LES PROPOSITIONS COMPRENNENT NOTAMMENT LES SUJETS SUIVANTS :

  • les systèmes alimentaires : locaux et mondiaux, passés et actuels
  • la culture et les études culturelles
  • la recherche interdisciplinaire ou dans une seule discipline
  • les arts, le design et la technologie
  • l’éthique, la philosophie et les valeurs
  • l’accès aux aliments, la sécurité et la souveraineté alimentaires
  • la migration, l’immigration, la diaspora et les études sur les collectivités cosmopolites
  • la culture, l’agriculture et la préservation et l’innovation culinaires
  • la gouvernance, les politiques et les droits
  • la pédagogie, l’éducation alimentaire et l’apprentissage par l’expérience
  • la main-d’œuvre dans le système alimentaire, la production et la consommation
  • l’énergie et l’agriculture
  • la santé : les problèmes, les paradigmes et les professions

PROCÉDURE DE DÉPÔT DES PROPOSITIONS :

Date butoir de réception des résumés : 31 janvier 2016

TOUTES LES PROPOSITIONS DOIVENT COMPRENDRE :

  1. le type de proposition (p. ex. une communication, un panel, une table ronde, une présentation Pecha Kucha, une salle d’exposition, etc.);
  2. le titre de la communication, du panel ou de l’événement;
  3. le nom de la personne qui soumet une proposition, son affiliation organisationnelle et son statut (p. ex. premier cycle, deuxième cycle, postdoctorat, universitaire, chercheur indépendant, collectivité)
  4. l’adresse courriel de la personne qui soumet une proposition;
  5. les noms, courriels et affiliations organisationnelles des coauteurs ou coorganisateurs;
  6. le résumé, 250 mots et moins, qui décrit la communication, le panel ou l’événement proposé;
  7. l’indication de tout besoin audiovisuel ou technologique
  8. une liste comprenant jusqu’à six phrases ou mots clés descriptifs que le comité de programme pourra utiliser dans l’organisation des séances et des événements

Tables rondes : Les tables rondes sont des forums de discussion informelle où les personnes participantes s’expriment pendant une courte période avant d’échanger avec les membres de l’auditoire. Veuillez présenter un seul résumé avec une liste de personnes participantes. Il n’y a pas de communications formelles pour les tables rondes.

Panels : Les panels sont des groupes déjà formés qui ne présentent pas plus de 4 communications et comptent un président ou une présidente et une personne qui expose (qui peut être une seule personne). Veuillez présenter le résumé du panel ainsi que de chacune des communications individuelles. Les personnes qui organisent la conférence déploieront tous les efforts possibles pour préserver les panels, mais se réservent le droit de déplacer les communications après avoir consulté les organisateurs et organisatrices.

Communications individuelles : Les communications seront regroupées par similitude thématique au meilleur des capacités des organisateurs et organisatrices du programme. Veuillez présenter un seul résumé avec les coordonnées d’une personne-ressource.

Ateliers : Un nombre limité d’ateliers pourra être organisé, dont les démonstrations culinaires (veuillez adresser un courriel à culinaria@utsc.utoronto.ca pour en connaître les exigences avant de présenter une proposition). Veuillez indiquer si la préinscription est nécessaire. Veuillez fournir un résumé, une liste détaillée des organisateurs et organisatrices, des ressources et de l’espace requis, ainsi que des coûts prévus.

Propositions de présentations Pecha Kucha : Le Pecha Kucha est une courte présentation qui comporte exactement 20 diapositives, exposées durant 20 secondes chacune (en utilisant la minuterie de PowerPoint ou de Keynote), pour une période totale de présentation de 6 minutes et 40 secondes. Il vise à exposer une ou deux idées clés, plutôt que tout le projet d’étude ou de recherche. Les présentateurs ou présentatrices devraient songer en termes de description, de narration, d’un thème, d’une voie expérimentale ou autre BRÈVE notion.

Propositions pour la salle d’exposition et les communications par affichage : On invite les étudiants et étudiantes de deuxième cycle, les spécialistes de l’alimentation, les ONG, les chercheurs hors université, les artistes et autres membres de la collectivité à présenter des travaux à la salle d’exposition 2016. L’exposition accueille tous les supports, y compris les installations, les documents imprimés et autres formats visuels, audio, affiches et toutes autres œuvres d’art et de design. Le nombre de présentations sur écran accepté sera limité.

Les notifications d’acceptation seront fournies d’ici le 1er mars. Les personnes participantes doivent s’inscrire avant le 30 avril pour ne pas être retirées du programme. Elles doivent être membres en règle de l’ASFS, l’ACÉA ou la AFHVS au moment de la conférence. Les personnes qui organisent la conférence déplorent ne pas pouvoir défrayer le coût du voyage pour la participation à l’assemblée annuelle. Elles se réservent le droit de limiter l’acceptation de soumissions multiples présentées par un seul auteur. L’espace pour les ateliers est limité et sera déterminé en fonction des ressources disponibles.

Veuillez noter que tous les coauteurs, présentateurs et présentatrices doivent s’inscrire individuellement pour apparaître dans le programme.

Veuillez adresser vos questions à culinaria@utsc.utoronto.ca

http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/conferences/scarboroughfare/fr/home-fr/

2016 CAFS Pre-Conference Call for Proposals

For the Joint Conference of Food Researchers from CAFS, ASFS, and AFHVS

2016 Pre-Conference for Students, Postdocs and Emerging Scholars

University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

June 21st 2016

Cost: $30 (lunch and snacks included)

About Pre-Conference

The Canadian Association for Food Studies (CAFS) invites you to join a full day preconference event, open to all students, postdocs and emerging researchers (including new faculty, sessionals, and community-based researchers). The pre-conference is a unique opportunity to engage with like-minded peers, build your connections and networks internationally and across disciplines, share your ideas, and gain both theoretical and practical knowledge and skills of particular relevance to new researchers. The field of food studies is an active and diverse area of research with unique challenges and endless opportunities. This year’s pre-conference programming will focus on the challenges of researching in this diverse field, provide career guidance to emerging researchers in food studies, and include opportunities for participants to share their own research in the format of a poster presentation. The full conference event, titled Scarborough Fare, will be hosted at the University of Toronto, Scarborough campus from June 22-26th 2016. It will be a joint meeting of CAFS and two American associations: Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society (AFHVS), and the Association for the Study of Food and Society (ASFS).

Poster Submissions

This year the pre-conference invites emerging researchers to participate in the Research Fair & Poster Session. The session is an opportunity for burgeoning food researchers to have the space to present a recent research project, paper, or thesis with a 3 minute “elevator pitch” and poster. This session is designed to foster interaction and engagement in a casual setting, and to encourage networking and social connection. If you are interested in participating in the Research Fair & Poster Session, you must submit a completed submission form (attached or below) by Sunday April 17th, 2016 to cafs.preconference@gmail.com. See submission form for complete poster submission guidelines.

Registration

More information on how to register for the pre-conference and Scarborough Fare will be announced at: https://afhvs.wildapricot.org/2016-conference-Toronto-ON

Or contact us with questions at: cafs.preconference@gmail.com.

Appel à communications par affichage 2016

Journée préconférence pour étudiants et chercheurs émergents de l’Association canadienne des études sur l’alimentation (ACÉA)

dans le cadre de la « Scarborough Fare » de l’ACÉA, de l’Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society (AFHVS), et de l’Association for the Study of Food and Society (ASFS).

Université de Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

le 21 juin 2016

Frais d’inscription : 30$ (dîner et collation inclus)

À propos de la journée préconférence

L’ACÉA invite les étudiants, postdoctorants et chercheurs émergents (incluant les nouveaux membres de facultés, chargés de cours et chercheurs du milieu communautaire) à une journée préconférence. Cette journée sera non seulement l’occasion de réseauter avec des chercheurs issus d’une variété de disciplines s’intéressant à l’alimentation, mais aussi d’étendre votre réseau à travers le Canada et même à l’international. Vous pourrez y partager vos idées et améliorer vos connaissances tant pratiques que théoriques sur maints enjeux pertinents pour les jeunes chercheurs. En effet, le champ des études sur l’alimentation est actuellement foisonnant. La diversité des approches et des disciplines qui le traversent sont couplées de défis et de vastes possibilités. C’est dans ce cadre que la programmation de la préconférence sera axée sur les défis inhérents à la recherche sur l’alimentation, sur les manières d’y faire carrière comme jeune chercheur, et ce, tout en offrant la possibilité aux participants de partager leurs recherches sous forme d’une session par affichage. L’événement-conférence intitulé « Scarborough Fare » aura lieu à l’Université de Toronto au campus Scarborough du 22 au 26 juin 2016. Il s’agira d’une rencontre entre trois associations d’importance dans le domaine de l’alimentation en Amérique du Nord, soit une canadienne, l’Association canadienne des études sur l’alimentation (ACÉA), et deux étatsuniennes, l’« Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society » (AFHVS) et l’« Association for the Study of Food and Society» (ASFS).

Propositions pour la session par affichage

Cette année, nous invitons les chercheurs émergents à participer à une session par affichage. Il s’agit d’une occasion de présenter une recherche, une communication scientifique ou une thèse sous forme d’affiche et d’une brève présentation de 3 minutes. L’objectif de cette session est de favoriser les échanges de connaissances, les interactions informelles et le réseautage entre les jeunes chercheurs et les participants à la journée préconférence. Si vous souhaitez participer à la session par affichage, vous devez nous faire parvenir le formulaire de soumission ci-joint dûment rempli par courriel avant le dimanche 17 avril 2016 à cafs.preconference@gmail.com. Pour plus d’informations, veuillez consulter le formulaire de soumission.

Inscriptions

Nous annoncerons prochainement les informations sur comment s’inscrire à la journée preconference et à la « Scarborough Fare » à : https://afhvs.wildapricot.org/2016-conference-Toronto-ON . Si vous avez des questions, contactez-nous à : cafs.preconference@gmail.com.

 

2 Comments

Filed under AFHVS, anthropology, ASFS, CAFS, CFP, conferences

ASFS Student Paper Awards!

The Association for the Study of Food and Society has annual student paper awards. Details for this year’s awards are below. Note that the deadline is February 1, 2016. Part of the prize includes the opportunity to present at the annual ASFS/AFHVS…which SAFN cosponsors.

Here is the ASFS announcement (as noted below, please contact Riki Saltzman if you have any questions):

ASFS Student Paper Awards

Student Award Submission Guidelines

Deadline for Annual Submission (all required material): February 1. NO Exceptions! Electronic submissions ONLY!

The ASFS invites current undergraduate and graduate to submit a paper for the William Whit (undergraduate) and Alex McIntosh (graduate) prizes, respectively. These awards recognize students’ contributions to the field of food studies. There will be one award each for an undergraduate student paper and a graduate student paper. ASFS welcomes submissions on a wide range of issues relating to food, society and culture, and from the diverse disciplinary and trans-disciplinary fields that ASFS encompasses. The author of each award-winning paper will receive:

  • $500
  • payment of annual membership and conference fees to be applied to the following year if student is not attending in the current year
  • a free banquet ticket for the coming year’s annual meeting or the following year’s if a ticket has already been purchased or the student is not attending the conference in the current year; and
  • the opportunity to present prize-winning papers at an ASFS/AFHVS conference. Winners who wish to present the year they receive their award must have submitted a conference abstract in that same year.

Please note

  • Authors are highly encouraged to simultaneously submit an abstract to the ASFS/AFHVS conference by the conference deadline. Conference organizers cannot add your paper to an already completed program; you MUST submit an abstract by the deadline.
  • Prize winning papers may be presented at an ASFS/AFHVS conference within two years of award. Those prize winners who submit a conference abstract in the subsequent two years, should indicate their award status (year and name of award) with the abstract.
  • Prize winners may also postpone their registration and banquet ticket use for one year following the award.

Submission Guidelines and Conditions of Award

Eligible entries must

  • have been written for a course or research project (NOT a dissertation or MA thesis chapter UNLESS it was written as a separate paper for a specific course) directed by a faculty member at an academic institution or research institute;
  • have been completed within one year prior to submission date (no earlier than the previous February);
  • be authored by a single student; and
  • be submitted via email with ALL required documents as separate and attached documents:
    • a completed and separate submission cover sheet (see below for requirements);
    • the properly formatted paper; and
    • Supervising professor’s letter must be on letterhead and signed (pdf scans are more than fine) and state: the name of the student, the course, the term/dates the course was taught and the paper written plus a statement testifying to single-handed authorship and veracity of information and data (please scan the signed letter or use an electronic signature and attach).There is no need for an extended letter.
  • The STUDENT must submit all documents by the deadline. Do NOT ask your supervising professor to submit his/her letter separately.

Format

  • Submit each document as a separate PDF; do NOT put them all in one PDF.
  • Do: put the title of the paper on each page
  • Do NOT: put the author’s name on the body of the paper; remove your name from the document properties (right click) and save. Submit THAT version.
  • Style & format: APA, MLA, Chicago
  • Word count: up to 5,000 words, excluding references and notes. Provide a word count on the cover sheet for your paper, your support material (see below), and the final count with your notes and references.
  • Do not submit papers with extended appendices, illustrations, etc. Limit that material to no more than 1000 words above the 5,000 for your paper.
  • Text: double-space and include references and bibliographic information
  • Margins: 1 inch top, bottom, left, right
  • Numbering: bottom center of each page Justification: left
  • Font style: use a serif font (such as Palatino, Times, Times New Roman, or Century Schoolbook), NOT a sans serif font (such as Arial, Geneva, or Verdana)
  • Font size: 12 point
  • For ALL submissions: make sure your document info does NOT have your name embedded the document information

Cover Sheet (separate document from your paper) MUST include

Submission for (check one):

___ Graduate Prize
___ Undergraduate Prize

Date of submission:
Title of paper:
Word count (excluding notes and references):

Author’s name:

Address:
Email address:

School attended when paper was written:
Degree Program (BA, MA, PhD):
Department, course title, term (fall/winter/spring/summer and year) for which paper was written:
DATE (m/d/y) Written:
Professor/Advisor for whom paper was written:
Professor/Advisor’s email address and phone number:

Evaluation Criteria (up to 10 points for each)

  • Originality and Contribution to the field of food studies: to what extent does this paper expand our knowledge of food, culture, and social life? How original is its approach to analyzing its topic?
  • Application of appropriate methods: Has the author used the best methods for this particular issue? Does the paper illustrate a command of a particular form of analysis? (We encourage interdisciplinary work, so this is a good place to evaluate the innovativeness of the author’s approach).
  • Clarity and organization of the data: Does the paper present its evidence in a coherent fashion?
  • Quality of writing: How well does the paper convey a story and speak to a broad audience. In particular, we want to honor papers that are readable and speak across disciplines.
  • Theoretical sense: To what extent does the paper use a recognizable framework? Does the paper use theory synthetically without heavy reliance on quotes and excessive jargon?

Not eligible

  • Videos and other non-print formats
  • Late submissions
  • Submissions without faculty letter of verification and submission sheet
  • Papers submitted to AFHVS (and vice versa). (ASFS reserves the right to refer papers to AFHVS.)
  • Papers that do not fit the criteria specified

Submission Instructions

Submit an electronic version of the paper, which does not include personally identifying information, along with the submission cover sheet and electronic letter from the primary supervising professor to: Riki Saltzman. Dr. Saltzman will ensure that anonymous copies of the paper are sent to the Adjudication Committee. Please contact Riki Saltzman, Adjudication Committee Chair, for more information.

2 Comments

Filed under anthropology, ASFS, awards, Food Studies

Letters from Camp: A Reflection on the 2015 Annual Meetings of ASFS and AFHVS

Madeline Chera
Indiana University

Madeline Chera is a PhD candidate in Anthropology with a focus on the anthropology of food. She is the student representative on the ASFS board and a 2011 winner of the Christine Wilson Award from SAFN.

The annual American Anthropological Association (AAA) meetings give food and nutrition anthropologists a much needed break at the end of the fall semester and invigorates our minds enough to push through grading final papers in dreary December. However, there is another conference that many of us attend, which takes on an air more befitting summer vacation. It’s somewhat akin to a scholarly summer camp, with critical thinking and good food. It is the joint annual meetings for the Association for the Study of Food and Society (ASFS) and the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society (AFHVS). Compared to the AAA meetings, it is much smaller, the feeling is more intimate, and the vibe is decidedly jovial. This year’s meetings took place over five days from June 24 through June 28 and packed in ten concurrent panels during each of twelve sessions, but there were plenty of opportunities to meet the same friendly faces throughout the weekend, whether it was at panel presentations, before the keynote, or over drinks.

This is a conference for our (i.e. SAFN’s) kind of people: those interested in exploring the local food culture with their minds and mouths, eager to collaborate in a spirit of conviviality, and ready to discuss a wide range of issues, from class and colonialism in the food system to the ins and outs of fried candy bars (my co-panelist, Christine Knight, actually covered both of these topics in her presentation on media representations and Scottish identity!). However, despite the affinities in interest and the numerous shared values of the conference-goers, one of the benefits of this event is that the participants are not all alike–and not all like us. Although SAFN does have a prominent presence at the ASFS and AFHVS meetings through numerous presenters and sponsorship of two sessions and one of the socializing (and snacking!) opportunities this year, this annual conference is not just a SAFN meeting. The meetings of ASFS and AFHVS are a valuable opportunity for SAFN members to spend time with other scholars of food and agriculture and with professionals in related fields, and to gain exposure to different methods, areas of literature, pedagogical techniques, and topics of investigation. In fact, this opportunity was highlighted in the guiding motif of the meetings. Chatham University’s Falk School of Sustainability and its Food Studies Program hosted the conference this year in Pittsburgh, a city known for its iconic bridges, and the conference theme, “Bridging the Past, Cultivating the Future,” gave a nod to the power of these structures to join together otherwise disjointed entities. The meetings united sociologists, historians, nutritionists and dieticians, philosophers, psychologists, political scientists, media studies and consumption studies scholars, environmental and agricultural scientists, entrepreneurs, non-profit staff, activists, writers, chefs, and–yes–anthropologists.

Any worthwhile conference aims to build bridges between colleagues and across existing research, as well as to cultivate ideas that steer the work that will come afterward. This one just had the good sense to set out these goals explicitly from the beginning, and it had the implicit bonus ambition to help us savor summer with the jubilant vibe–as much as any academic conference can really have–that is the hallmark of the ASFS/AFHVS annual meetings. The following are a smattering of my personal highlights from this scholarly summer camp:

  • Staying with a Falk School alumna and her housemates in the beautiful Highland Park neighborhood of Pittsburgh. Not only was this a financial benefit to me as a penny-pinching graduate student, but also I got to explore and learn about the city from the perspective of a local residence and residents. I got their tips for a nearby coffee shop and tasted some cherries from their CSA, and then I had the opportunity to hear about how Pittsburgh’s food and sustainability scene impacted their lives as people who aren’t researching such issues full-time. Although it was brief, the chance to be just a bit more embedded into the context of the area made the experience richer for me.
  • Networking with fellow graduate students. Another student was staying at the house with me, and we were able to chat over last minute tweaks to our presentations. During the day, we kept running into each other in between sessions, and in turn, introduced each other to the people we had met. The size and set up of the conference this year, as in other years, was conducive to repeated exposure, which fostered familiarity and led to some potentially fruitful as well as thoroughly enjoyable connections. From discussions with graduate students, I was able to learn about the structures of other food-focused graduate programs, get insight into areas of research I never would have considered previously, and generate ideas about how to market oneself in order to find desirable work (g. When is using a tool like Good Food Good Jobs helpful and when is it not? And how does one manage the feast-or-famine cash flow of consulting work?).
  • Discussing alternative-to-academic career paths. I was part of a group of several graduate students who had all put in proposals for roundtable discussions about professionalization. In the end, our sessions were combined into a super-panel of women with advanced degrees who are not employed primarily as professors but continue to do work related to food and agriculture in some way. The participants had worked as market researchers, writers, and entrepreneurs, and in a food policy council, state extension services, a university, other non-profit organizations, and private business. Each of them traced out her own study and work trajectory, and then they all answered questions from the audience. The discussion yielded tips for translating the skills honed in graduate school to those hiring in the non-academic world and about where to look for positions. Participants also explained their experiences with job training in different types of positions, and assessed the usefulness of more schooling in different scenarios. This session affirmed for me the wide applicability and value of the grant writing, communication, data analysis, project management, and storytelling skills that my professors have helped me develop and to see that there are many ways to apply the content based knowledge of the field right along with these skills. It was heartening to see these professionals maintaining their scholarly ties through participation in the conference, and they were very kind to provide group mentorship in that form.
  • Rubbing elbows with VIPs, who treated me as a peer. Most of the time I can play it somewhat cool, but the glimmer of our own food scholar stars has not worn off for me yet, and I still get a bit excited when Esteemed Professor X listens to my paper and even asks a question, and when Recognized Expert and Author Y chats with me casually by the coffee carafe. So, I get excited fairly frequently, because this conference is usually one in which the friendliness of the group makes it easy to strike up conversations, with undergraduates and senior professors alike. The tone was one of genuine interest and mutual support, and the names from my Food Studies qualifying exams list were not only encouraging my work and the work of my fellow grad students, but also sometimes inviting us to dinner with them! Students echoed the collegial sentiment, and everyone created an environment in which new ideas could be tested out with a response as positive as that given when forthcoming book chapters were read.
  • Catching up on the latest in the field. Given that I am a borderline book hoarder, the fact that I only brought a carry-on bag with me was an important wallet-saving buffer between me and the collection of exciting new literature for sale at the conference. Many of the volumes were written or have been reviewed by conference attendees and they represented a slice of what is new in the studies of food, agriculture, and society. However, the more cutting-edge material was in the sessions themselves, where I heard about a wide range of topics, including the complicated relationships between contemporary chefs and new media; the politics mediated by travel writing and botanical classifications in the colonial period; and the assessment of behavioral and attitudinal changes of students as a result of participation in food studies programs. If only I could have been in ten sessions at once, maybe I would be totally up-to-date!
mad mex burrito

Enormous local burrito.

Alas, I could not be in ten sessions at once, so I resigned myself to absorb what I could and then enjoy the cruise-like-but-better part:

  • Eating delicious and thoughtfully selected food. It probably comes as no surprise that this crowd loves good food, so there were plenty of opportunities to socialize over delicious and well-curated food and drink, including local stand-outs Wigle Whiskey, Rivertowne beer, Venturi yogurt, and the culinary creations of Chatham students. One of the best things I had was a single fresh peach put out with the morning coffee. I got the sense that the conference organizers’ list of recommended dining options nearby had been deliberated over carefully and vetted by more than one expert. It all added to the excitement and enjoyment that punctuated every coffee break and the end of each day.
  • Sporting my collection of fruit-themed earrings and seeing one of my best friends for the first time in over a year.

    Chera selfie

    The author, with earrings and Leigh Bush.

Leave a comment

Filed under AFHVS, anthropology, ASFS, Food Studies

SAFN at the 2015 Association for the Study of Food and Society Conference

asfs-conference-2015

Once again SAFN is co-sponsoring the Association for the Study of Food and Society meeting, which will be held this year in Pittsburgh from June 24-28. More details about the conference are available here on the conference web site.

Many members of SAFN will be presenting their research at the conference. The following is list of SAFN member papers and panels:

Thursday, 1:30 – 2:45

C7. PANEL Contextualizing Farming and Food Security
Buhl Beckwith
Hayden Kantor, Cornell University
Growing Ambivalence: Shifting Cropping Strategies for Staple Crops in Bihar, India


Thursday, 1:30-2:45, Mellon Devore Room

C5 PANEL: Breaking Barriers, Building Bridges: Discussing Alternatives to the Academy for Scholars and Career Seekers in Food and Nutrition

Organizers: Leigh Bush, Indiana University; Maria Carabello, University of Vermont; Madeleine Chera, Indiana University; Elyzabeth Engle, Penn State University; Emily Stengel, University of Vermont
Participants: Elyzabeth Engle, Penn State University (Chair); Dara Bloom, North Carolina State; Jenifer Buckley, Organic Processing Institute; Greg Hall, Virtue Cider; Lucy Norris, Puget Sound Food Hub/Northwest Agriculture Business Center; Marisol Pierce-Quinonez, World Bank; Leslie Pillen, Penn State University; Dawn Plummer, Pittsburgh Food Policy Council

Abstract: Graduate school is an essential part of preparing for many careers in fields related to interdisciplinary agricultural and food studies. And while years are spent on building critical knowledge and skills to prepare students for employment post-graduation, how does one actually apply that learning to work, especially work that is outside of the academy or explicitly extends beyond it? How do we negotiate partner or employer demands for quantifiable outcomes, quick application, and more, in light of our commitments to ethical and thorough research and our experiences with different approaches and timelines? How do we translate our training into effective work that makes a “real world” impact but also reflects the scholarly rigor, values, and best practices of the academy?

As a follow-up to last year’s career-path panel for graduate students, this session aims to continue the conversation about jobs that utilize the engaged research skills graduate students in food and agriculture can offer to companies, non-profits, non-governmental agencies, and communities. This panel discussion aims to create a space in which graduate students can interact with a panel of early- and mid-career professionals, with the objective of profiling career trajectories and documenting important considerations for students with advanced degrees in agrifood-related studies who are interested in finding work beyond academia. The panel will reflect the interdisciplinary and diverse nature of agrifood careers, representing a variety of sectors, including businesses, research centers, non-profits, and governmental agencies. The panelists will discuss focus questions about balancing multiple interests and approaches in their work, and reflect on specific job experiences and the lessons gleaned from them. Then the audience will be encouraged to share questions and comments with participants.

This panel will be of great interest to graduate students or recent graduates, but also to other members at any stage of their careers, especially those advising undergraduate or graduate students, those considering new opportunities for themselves, or those struggling with the task of translating their training into their work.


Thursday, 2:45-4:00, JMK Library LCC2

D10 PANEL: Bridging Culture and Change

Madeline Chera, Indiana University
Between Meals and Meanings: Notes on Snack Culture in South India
Christine Knight, University of Edinburgh:
Changing cultural representations of the Scottish diet, c.1950-2014
Habiba Boumlik, LaGuardia Community College:
Traditional Cuisine-Modern Revisited Cuisine via Food Networks and social media. The case of Chumicha in Morocco


Friday, 10:15 – 11:30

F8 PANEL: Sensing Food: Taste, Place, Memory, Power

Carole Counihan, Millersville University:
Gustatory Activism in Sardinia: Taste and the Political Power of Food
Beth Forrest, Culinary Institute of America:
I Sensed this Tasted like Hell: The Role of Food, the Senses, and Identity in the Nineteenth Century
Lisa Heldke, Gustavus Adolphus College:
My Dead Father’s Raspberry Patch, My Dead Mother’s Piecrust: Understanding Memory as Sense
Deirdre Murphy, Culinary Institute of America:
Sugar Bush: Maple syrup and the Solitude of labor in the Industrial Age


Friday, 1:00 – 2:15 – JMK Library 103

G1. PANEL Intoxicants: Pleasure, Nutrition, Aesthetics Organizer: Kima Cargill, University of Washington
Kima Cargill, University of Washington
Sugar is Toxic, But is It Intoxicating?
Janet Chrzan, University of Pennsylvania
Alcohol: Drug or Food?
Sierra Clark, New York University:
The Problem of Pleasure: Intoxication and the Evaluation of Alcohol


Friday, 1:00-2:15 – Coolidge Sanger

G6. PANEL: What makes “food work” sustainable – values, representations, and images in contemporary foodscapes
Organizer: Carole Biewener, Simmons College
Carole Biewener, Simmons College:
“Good Food” and “Good Jobs”? Does Boston’s local food movement address “sustainability” and “justice” for food system workers?
Tara Agrawal Pedulla, Carrie Freshour, Cornell University:
Serving Up the Public Plate: Food work and workers in the public sector
Kimberly E. Johnson, Syracuse University
Contemplating myths, invisibility, and the value of food work on multiple levels
Penny Van Esterik, York University:
Breastfeeding as Foodwork


Saturday, 10:15-11:30, Dilworth 100

K8. PANEL: The Cultural Economy of Food in Place
David Beriss, University of New Orleans:
Tacos, Kale, and Vietnamese Po’Boys: The Re-Creolization of Food in Postdiluvian New Orleans
Gianna Fazioli, Chatham University:
The Ecological and Culture Effect of Development on Isaan Thai Food
Liora Gvion, Hebrew University
“I would expect from a Palestinian cook to…..”: Master Chef Israel, National Narratives and the Politics Embedded in Cooking


Saturday, 1:00 – 2:15, Dilworth 006

Panel L 9, Countering Globalization: The Protection and Representation of an Indigenous Food Fare in East Asia
Chair: Stephanie Assman, Hokkaido University
Organizer: Jakob Klein, University of London
Presentations: Stephanie Assman (Hokkaido University), The Return to a Culinary Heritage: The Food Education Campaign in Japan
Greg de St. Maurice (University of Pittsburgh), Kyoto Cuisine Gone Global
Lanlan Kuang (University of Central Florida), “People’s Food” : The Aesthetic of Chinese Food in Chinese Media in the case of a Bite of China and The Taste of China

1 Comment

Filed under ASFS

ASFS Student Paper Awards

The Association for the Study of Food and Society announces its student paper award competition!

Deadline for Annual Submission: February 1. Electronic submissions ONLY!

The ASFS invites current undergraduate and graduate (single authors only) to submit a paper for the William Whit (undergraduate) and Alex McIntosh (graduate) prizes, respectively. These awards recognize students’ contributions to the field of food studies. There will be one award each for an undergraduate student paper and a graduate student paper. ASFS welcomes submissions on a wide range of issues relating to food, society and culture, and from the diverse disciplinary and trans-disciplinary fields that ASFS encompasses. The author of each award-winning paper will receive:

  • $500
  • payment of annual membership and conference fees to be applied to the following year if student is not attending in the current year
  • a free banquet ticket for the coming year’s annual meeting or the following year’s if a ticket has already been purchased or the student is not attending the conference in the current year; and
  • the opportunity to present prize-winning papers at an ASFS/AFHVS conference. Winners who wish to present the year they receive their award must have submitted a conference abstract in that same year.

For further details, please visit the ASFS web site (www.food-culture.org/asfs-student-paper-award/) for the award.

Leave a comment

Filed under anthropology, ASFS, awards, Food Studies, students