SAFN at the 2015 Association for the Study of Food and Society Conference

asfs-conference-2015

Once again SAFN is co-sponsoring the Association for the Study of Food and Society meeting, which will be held this year in Pittsburgh from June 24-28. More details about the conference are available here on the conference web site.

Many members of SAFN will be presenting their research at the conference. The following is list of SAFN member papers and panels:

Thursday, 1:30 – 2:45

C7. PANEL Contextualizing Farming and Food Security
Buhl Beckwith
Hayden Kantor, Cornell University
Growing Ambivalence: Shifting Cropping Strategies for Staple Crops in Bihar, India


Thursday, 1:30-2:45, Mellon Devore Room

C5 PANEL: Breaking Barriers, Building Bridges: Discussing Alternatives to the Academy for Scholars and Career Seekers in Food and Nutrition

Organizers: Leigh Bush, Indiana University; Maria Carabello, University of Vermont; Madeleine Chera, Indiana University; Elyzabeth Engle, Penn State University; Emily Stengel, University of Vermont
Participants: Elyzabeth Engle, Penn State University (Chair); Dara Bloom, North Carolina State; Jenifer Buckley, Organic Processing Institute; Greg Hall, Virtue Cider; Lucy Norris, Puget Sound Food Hub/Northwest Agriculture Business Center; Marisol Pierce-Quinonez, World Bank; Leslie Pillen, Penn State University; Dawn Plummer, Pittsburgh Food Policy Council

Abstract: Graduate school is an essential part of preparing for many careers in fields related to interdisciplinary agricultural and food studies. And while years are spent on building critical knowledge and skills to prepare students for employment post-graduation, how does one actually apply that learning to work, especially work that is outside of the academy or explicitly extends beyond it? How do we negotiate partner or employer demands for quantifiable outcomes, quick application, and more, in light of our commitments to ethical and thorough research and our experiences with different approaches and timelines? How do we translate our training into effective work that makes a “real world” impact but also reflects the scholarly rigor, values, and best practices of the academy?

As a follow-up to last year’s career-path panel for graduate students, this session aims to continue the conversation about jobs that utilize the engaged research skills graduate students in food and agriculture can offer to companies, non-profits, non-governmental agencies, and communities. This panel discussion aims to create a space in which graduate students can interact with a panel of early- and mid-career professionals, with the objective of profiling career trajectories and documenting important considerations for students with advanced degrees in agrifood-related studies who are interested in finding work beyond academia. The panel will reflect the interdisciplinary and diverse nature of agrifood careers, representing a variety of sectors, including businesses, research centers, non-profits, and governmental agencies. The panelists will discuss focus questions about balancing multiple interests and approaches in their work, and reflect on specific job experiences and the lessons gleaned from them. Then the audience will be encouraged to share questions and comments with participants.

This panel will be of great interest to graduate students or recent graduates, but also to other members at any stage of their careers, especially those advising undergraduate or graduate students, those considering new opportunities for themselves, or those struggling with the task of translating their training into their work.


Thursday, 2:45-4:00, JMK Library LCC2

D10 PANEL: Bridging Culture and Change

Madeline Chera, Indiana University
Between Meals and Meanings: Notes on Snack Culture in South India
Christine Knight, University of Edinburgh:
Changing cultural representations of the Scottish diet, c.1950-2014
Habiba Boumlik, LaGuardia Community College:
Traditional Cuisine-Modern Revisited Cuisine via Food Networks and social media. The case of Chumicha in Morocco


Friday, 10:15 – 11:30

F8 PANEL: Sensing Food: Taste, Place, Memory, Power

Carole Counihan, Millersville University:
Gustatory Activism in Sardinia: Taste and the Political Power of Food
Beth Forrest, Culinary Institute of America:
I Sensed this Tasted like Hell: The Role of Food, the Senses, and Identity in the Nineteenth Century
Lisa Heldke, Gustavus Adolphus College:
My Dead Father’s Raspberry Patch, My Dead Mother’s Piecrust: Understanding Memory as Sense
Deirdre Murphy, Culinary Institute of America:
Sugar Bush: Maple syrup and the Solitude of labor in the Industrial Age


Friday, 1:00 – 2:15 – JMK Library 103

G1. PANEL Intoxicants: Pleasure, Nutrition, Aesthetics Organizer: Kima Cargill, University of Washington
Kima Cargill, University of Washington
Sugar is Toxic, But is It Intoxicating?
Janet Chrzan, University of Pennsylvania
Alcohol: Drug or Food?
Sierra Clark, New York University:
The Problem of Pleasure: Intoxication and the Evaluation of Alcohol


Friday, 1:00-2:15 – Coolidge Sanger

G6. PANEL: What makes “food work” sustainable – values, representations, and images in contemporary foodscapes
Organizer: Carole Biewener, Simmons College
Carole Biewener, Simmons College:
“Good Food” and “Good Jobs”? Does Boston’s local food movement address “sustainability” and “justice” for food system workers?
Tara Agrawal Pedulla, Carrie Freshour, Cornell University:
Serving Up the Public Plate: Food work and workers in the public sector
Kimberly E. Johnson, Syracuse University
Contemplating myths, invisibility, and the value of food work on multiple levels
Penny Van Esterik, York University:
Breastfeeding as Foodwork


Saturday, 10:15-11:30, Dilworth 100

K8. PANEL: The Cultural Economy of Food in Place
David Beriss, University of New Orleans:
Tacos, Kale, and Vietnamese Po’Boys: The Re-Creolization of Food in Postdiluvian New Orleans
Gianna Fazioli, Chatham University:
The Ecological and Culture Effect of Development on Isaan Thai Food
Liora Gvion, Hebrew University
“I would expect from a Palestinian cook to…..”: Master Chef Israel, National Narratives and the Politics Embedded in Cooking


Saturday, 1:00 – 2:15, Dilworth 006

Panel L 9, Countering Globalization: The Protection and Representation of an Indigenous Food Fare in East Asia
Chair: Stephanie Assman, Hokkaido University
Organizer: Jakob Klein, University of London
Presentations: Stephanie Assman (Hokkaido University), The Return to a Culinary Heritage: The Food Education Campaign in Japan
Greg de St. Maurice (University of Pittsburgh), Kyoto Cuisine Gone Global
Lanlan Kuang (University of Central Florida), “People’s Food” : The Aesthetic of Chinese Food in Chinese Media in the case of a Bite of China and The Taste of China

1 Comment

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One response to “SAFN at the 2015 Association for the Study of Food and Society Conference

  1. Pingback: Letters from Camp: A Reflection on the 2015 Annual Meetings of ASFS and AFHVS | FoodAnthropology

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