Category Archives: anthropology of food

What FoodAnthropology Is Reading Now, April 21, 2017

David Beriss

A brief digest of food and nutrition-related items that caught our attention recently. Got items you think we should include? Send links and brief descriptions to dberiss@gmail.com or hunterjo@gmail.com.

As the Trump administration nears its 100 day mark, it is worth noting that the US Department of Agriculture, with over 100,000 employees spread out over 29 agencies, regulating parts of an industry that contributes around $992 billion to the U.S. economy, is still without a confirmed leader. Lack of leadership has not stopped the Trump administration from acting, however. For instance, a rule proposed under the Obama administration that would have protected the rights of farmers to sue corporations for whom they raise chickens and hogs has been suspended for six months—and possibly permanently—much to the dismay of some of those farmers. The unconfirmed nominee has had a hearing, with mixed reviews, as you can see here and here.

Also on agriculture, but on a more global scale, the Lancet has recently started an open access online publication, “The Lancet Planetary Health,” that will focus on “human health within the context of climate change, water scarcity, biodiversity, food and nutrition, sustainable fishing, agricultural productivity, environmental exposures to contaminents, waste management, air quality, or water and airbourne diseases.” The first issue is worth a look. It includes an editorial about the role of smallholder farms in the global food system and several related articles.

And while we are still thinking about agriculture, take a look at this article and short film about a form of urban agriculture that is rarely discussed. The focus here is on farmers in Guangzhou, China, who continue to farm even as their village has vanished around them, replaced by endless rows of skyscrapers. This process is an old one, but watching this raises a lot of questions about food, culture, and the future of our food supply.

There has been a lot written about American barbecue cultures and racism in recent years. This New Yorker article, by Lauren Collins, focuses on the particularly bitter history and present of Maurice’s Piggie Park, in South Carolina. Collins does a great job of unpacking the nuances of this particular story in a way that would make for a great discussion starter in a class on…food, racism, American society, or the country’s political present. Alas, this is an article about barbecue that may cause you to lose your appetite.

From the UK, we have this interesting observation about a new restaurant in Seattle that will feature foods from the American South…served with an “encyclopedia” that explains the cuisine. The idea is to combat racist perspectives associated with the cuisine.  Food that insists you think.

Everyone wants to know where their food comes from, but who looks at how it gets to you? This episode of the podcast Bite focuses on an interview with Alexis Madrigal, who has his own podcast series on the world of containers and shipping. In this instance, he discusses the place of small batch coffee in the world of enormous containerized shipping. The way this shapes the world of food is really so huge that it is hard to fully grasp. You should listen to this; it is where much of what you eat comes from. Also, the podcast starts with a brief segment on Indian cooks in America who are thrilled with their Instant Pot electric pressure cookers…which ought to be inspiring for anyone who has one.

Many people are distressed at the demise of Lucky Peach, which provided a place for all kinds of food writing that was hard to find elsewhere (at least in an accessible format). For an example of why, read this amusing (yet possibly serious) article on the most beautiful Taco Bell in the world. Also, if you draw, you could join the Taco Bell Drawing Club.

Why are so many people being asked to work for free? This has been a crisis in the arts for a while, of course. Internships, mostly unpaid, seem increasingly necessary for college students before they can hope to start developing careers. Unpaid labor is also an important part of the world of food, with cooking school graduates and other aspiring cooks often engaging in “stages” (one of the culinary world’s words for “internship”) in restaurants. How useful is this? How exploitative? Is it even really legal? Corey Mintz explores these questions by looking at the astonishing extent to which the world’s most elite restaurants actually depend on unpaid labor.

The hipster food world is in love with mobile food vendors, perhaps best represented by trendy food trucks. Along with trendy trucks, a lot of food vending happens in carts that sell nearly every imaginable food.  This very useful article by Tejal Rao illustrates a day in the life of a New York City food vendor. His food looks great, by the way, but it is the result of hard work and what look like terrible economics.

In the realm of obscure-but-fascinating items, historian Paul Freedman provides this brief overview of the history of food at private clubs. The article includes lists and photos of current specialties at a variety of clubs around the U.S. One might expect the food to be rarified and elegant, but the photo of macaroons with Halloween candy corn suggests otherwise.

Finally, the first round of the French presidential elections is this Sunday (4/23). The outcome is anything but certain and, depending on your politics, you may need a drink afterwards. A French friend recently sent a clip from the movie “Le Tatoué,” with Jean Gabin and Louis de Funès demonstrating how to eat and drink with gusto. Even without faith in French politics, this should inspire everyone to have at least some faith in French cuisine, no matter the outcome. Remember this advice: “Manger des tripes sans cidre, c’est aller à Dieppe sans voir la mer.” Enjoy.

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Filed under agriculture, anthropology, anthropology of food, film, Food Studies

What FoodAnthropology Is Reading Now, April 3, 2017

David Beriss

A brief digest of food and nutrition-related items that caught our attention recently. Got items you think we should include? Send links and brief descriptions to dberiss@gmail.com or hunterjo@gmail.com.

Let’s start with U.S. policies that can have an impact on what we eat and drink. Over at Modern Farmer, Brian Barth has this round-up of cheery news, from the incredibly slow confirmation process for President Trump’s nominee for Secretary of Agriculture (still not confirmed), to proposed budget cuts for USDA and EPA, and opposition to something called (not by its authors), the “filthy food act.”

On that last point, you can read more about the effort to streamline government regulations (as it pertains to food) in a variety of places. On the broad issue of regulatory reform, this article from Politico provides a helpful overview. It is worth being skeptical of anyone who claims that they just want to make government more efficient, especially if the areas in which they focus their efforts happen to benefit their supporters. This editorial at Food Safety News makes the case that the regulatory reform proposed by the current administration will significantly undermine the regulation of food safety. Here is another analysis, from the Environmental Defense Fund.

On the proposed budget cuts, this article from Civil Eats, points out some of the effects of the president’s proposed budget on the regulation of food, on agriculture, and on food-related workers. It is, of course, only a proposed budget blueprint, not real appropriations for real agencies. However, the proposed budget is meant to provide insight into the new administration’s priorities, in case you were wondering about them.

We all probably know that kids who are not hungry do better in school. According to this article from The Atlantic, recent research in American schools suggests that better quality school lunches can improve student learning (or at least test scores) too. The idea that studies like this are necessary to justify feeding children better food at school tells us a great deal about American thinking about food, education, children, and more.

On the NPR blog The Salt, yet another reminder that the food industry (in this case, restaurants, bars, and agriculture) plays a significant role in human trafficking. Many people find themselves working in what amounts to slavery. The article refers to a recent report human trafficking and modern slavery, which you can find here.

The state of Arkansas recently passed legislation that would make anyone who takes pictures or videos of activities in nonpublic areas of private businesses subject to civil penalties. This is being criticized as “ag-gag” legislation because it was written to protect the poultry industry from animal rights activists. As it is written, the law could also limit the activities of whistleblowers in any number of industries.

What might those activists want to photograph? Perhaps meat processing plants. In Brazil, one of the world’s largest meatpacking companies is in the middle of a scandal in which its employees have been selling rancid meat to schools, grocery stores, etc. This article, from Civil Eats, points out that even if you buy only locally produced meat, you may still feel the global effects of the industrial meat industry.

From pemmican and tourtière, to poutine and Tim Horton’s donuts, this interesting article uses iconic foods to tell a story about Canadian history. Fascinating, to be sure, but also clearly just a start. Still, you have to give the author, Ian Mosby, credit for hard eyed realism. He includes fish sticks, Kraft Macaroni and Cheese, pablum, and other items that one generally does not associate with the word “cuisine” but that have had a real impact on everyday diets.

While we are in Canada, it is interesting to consider the ongoing debates around the links between food and ethnicity. This article, by Sara Peters, makes a case against something called “culinary gentrification,” which is the appropriation of foods (or of discourses about food) of an immigrant group by people in positions of greater power. The setting is Toronto, where there are indeed many kinds of people and foods.

Just when you thought it was safe to talk about urban agriculture, Wayne Roberts decided to review three books and insist on the use of the plural—urban agricultures—when discussing the topic. That covers an actual serious set of questions and issues that really are worth thinking about, like the relationship between urban agriculture(s) and urban planning, or the ways people can make urban agricultural practices part of their lives (like, I assume, cleaning up after your dog). There are a lot of ideas covered here, many of which could be of use in urban anthropology or food and culture classes.

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Filed under anthropology, anthropology of food, Food Studies

Applied Food and Nutrition Research, SfAA 2017

Amanda Green
Davidson College

The 2017 Society for Applied Anthropology meeting (March 28-April 1) in Santa Fe has shaped up to be an incredible showcase of food-related research. In particular, I want to draw your attention to six panels which take place on Tuesday and feature foodways of New Mexico and the Southwest, with topics ranging from markets, food hubs, and community gardens to Native American seed saving and agriculture of the Southwest. If you can’t make it by Tuesday, don’t worry. Thursday and Friday feature a food, agriculture, or fisheries panel during every session.

On Thursday at 10 am, my own session will discuss the contradictions and complements of movements for food sovereignty, food revitalization and food entrepreneurship. Our panelists will present case studies that capture the interlaced trails of food organizing in ways that make visible the interconnectedness and contradiction of their goals. These include bison ranching in Montana (van Winkle), global palm oil production (Elder), commerce and activism in Italy (Counihan), organic agriculture in Croatia (Orlić), reindeer herding in Swedish Sápmi (Green), and commentary from discussant Ellen Messer. (Session title: Complementary / Contradictory Directions: The Interlaced Trails of Food Entrepreneurship, Food Sovereignty and Food Revitalization Movements)

We’d love to highlight the work of SAFN members, so let us know about your sessions and papers. In case we missed your panel or presentation and you’d like your panel or presentation to be included in our PDF, please email Amanda Green at  amagreen@gmail.com.

We look forward to seeing you in Santa Fe.

The full conference program is here. Panels dedicated to food or agriculture themes listed by date include:

(T-31) TUESDAY 10:00-11:50 Ballroom South (La Fonda) Red or Green: From Market to Table

CHAIR: BEISWENGER, Lisa (OH State U) BEISWENGER, Lisa and COHEN, Jeffrey H. (OH State U) Tradition and Change at a Public Market KEIBLER, Christina (NMFMA) New Mexico Farmers’ Markets: New Directions with an Eye towards Tradition SANCHEZ, Stephanie M. (UNM) Los Jardines Institute and Sanchez Farms: Growing Food Sovereignty in the South Valley of New Mexico MUSUMECI, Salvatore (Catawba Coll) Green, Red, or Christmas: Sustaining a Culinary Identity in a City Rich in Culinary Tradition

(T-34) TUESDAY 10:00-11:50 La Terraza (La Fonda) Ancient and Modern Farming and Food in the Southwest

CHAIR: MAXWELL, Timothy D. (Museum of NM) FORD, Richard I. (U Mich LSA Museum) PreSpanish Contact Agricultural Methods in the Eastern Pueblos SANDOR, Jonathan A. (Iowa State U) Soil Management and Condition in Pueblo Agriculture MAXWELL, Timothy D. (Museum of NM) Making It as an Ancient Farmer in the Semi-Arid Southwest MCBRIDE, Pamela (Museum of NM) The Origins of Agriculture in New Mexico SWENTZELL, Roxanne (Santa Clara Pueblo) Pueblo Farming, Traditions and Food SWENTZELL, Porter (IAIA) The Pueblo Food Experience

(T-61) TUESDAY 12:00-1:20 Ballroom South (La Fonda) Food in New Mexico I: Native American Seedsaving and Gardens: Conserving Foodways and Identities in New Mexico

CHAIR: STANFORD, Lois (NMSU) PANELISTS: HILL, Christina (Iowa State U), JONES, Burrell (Middle San Juan Seed Bank), DESCHENIE, Desiree (Yego Gardening Proj), FISHER, Brittany (NMSU), BRASCOUPE, Clayton (TNAFA)

(T-91) TUESDAY 1:30-3:20 Ballroom South (La Fonda) Food in New Mexico II: Community Gardens in New Mexico and Arizona: Examining Local Projects to Establish Food Sovereignty and Food Justice

CHAIR: STANFORD, Lois (NMSU) PANELISTS: SANCHEZ, Stephan (UNM), GARCIA, Joe (Sanchez Farms), MARTINEZ, Sofia (UNM), DOMINGUEZ-ESHELMAN, Cristina and GARCIA, Manny (La Semilla Community Farm)

(T-108) TUESDAY 1:30-3:20 Meem (Drury) Food Systems and the Marine Environment in Local and Regional Food Systems of North America

CHAIRS: POE, Melissa (UW Sea Grant) and PINTO DA SILVA, Patricia (NOAA Fisheries) POE, Melissa and DONATUTO, Jamie (U WA Sea Grant, NOAA Fisheries) Food Sovereignty Programs as Adaptation Actions to Climate Change in Indigenous Communities Tied to Marine Systems INGLES, Palma (Coastal Perspectives Rrch) Feeding Families in Bush Alaska: Challenges of Obtaining Enough Fish to Meet Subsistence Needs in the Land of Plenty REGIS, Helen (LSU) and WALTON, Shana (Nicholls State U) You’re Not in Alaska Anymore: Toward a Community Definition of “Subsistence” in Coastal Louisiana PITCHON, Ana (SJSU) and HACKETT, Steven (Humboldt State U) Adaptation to Uncertainty in West Coast Fisheries SWEENEY TOOKES, Jennifer (Georgia Southern U) and YANDLE, Tracy (Emory U) ‘Because They Hurt and No One Wants to Eat Them!’: Understanding Caribbean Fishermen’s DecisionMaking Regarding Invasive Lionfish DISCUSSANT: PIN

(T-121) TUESDAY 3:30-5:20 Ballroom South (La Fonda) Food in New Mexico III: Community Food Projects and Food Hubs in New Mexico and Tuesday, March 28 9 Arizona: Examining Local Projects to Build Food Justice and Food Citizenship

CHAIRS: PAGE-REEVES, Janet (UNM) and STANFORD, Lois (NMSU) PANELISTS: JOHNSON, Danielle and POSNER, Xander (U Arizona), YANEZ, Catherine (La Semilla Food Ctr), LAMB, Jedrek (Agricultura Network, Albuquerque), ROMERO, Jeannie (Fiesta Grocery-Buying Club, Albuquerque), LOPEZ, Juan (First Choice Community Healthcare, Albquerque), KRAUSE, Carol (Fiesta Grocery-Buying Club, Albuquerque)

(T-126) TUESDAY 3:30-5:20 Stiha (La Fonda) Indigenous Culinary Traditions and Practices: Negotiating Foodways, Identity, and Culture

CHAIR: HEUER, Jacquelyn (NMSU) BOYERS, Janine (NMSU) Traditional Ecological Knowledge, Homegardens, and Migration in Yaxhachen, Yucatán, México CARDENAS OLEAS, Sumac Elisa (IA State U) Historically Ignored and Now Highly Demanded: The Quinoa Paradox HEUER, Jacquelyn (NMSU) Culture and Cuisine, Past and Present: Perceptions of Traditional Foodways among Indigenous Culinary Students KATZ, Esther (IRD) Indigenous Cuisine of the Rio Negro (Brazilian Amazon): Promoted or Despised? SERRATO, Claudia (UW) Ancestral Knowledge Systems & Decolonization: Nepantlerismo, Indigenous Culinary Art & Cuisine, and Ancestral Memory in Transit DISCUSSANT: FRANK, Lois (UNM)

(W-98) WEDNESDAY 1:30-3:20 Acoma North (Inn at Loretto) Heritage and Innovation: Intersections of Energy, Agriculture, and Ethics (C&A)

CHAIR: DURBIN, Trevor (U Wyoming) BESTERMAN-DAHAN, Karen, CHAVEZ, Margeaux, and NJOH, Eni (James A Haley VA) I Was Trained to Kill, Now I Am Learning to Grow Life”: Veterans Finding Purpose, Service and Connection through Agriculture CAPORUSSO, Jessica (York U) Razing Cane: Growing Energy Futures in a Colonial Present JANSSEN, Brandi (U Iowa) Closing the Loop: Ethics and Efficiency in Iowa’s Local Food System TARTER, Andrew (UF) Knock on Wood: Perception, Prediction, and Persistence of Charcoal Production in Haiti

(W-168) WEDNESDAY 5:30-7:20 Meem (Drury) Tools and Data to Support Fisheries Management

CHAIR: SPARKS, Kim (PSMFC) SPARKS, Kim and SANTOS, Anna N. (PSMFC), KASPERSKI, Steve (NOAA Fisheries), and HIMES-CORNELL, Amber (U Bretagne Occidentale/NOAA Fisheries) Groundtruthing Social Vulnerability Indices of Alaska Fishing Communities Wednesday, March 29 28 WIXOM, Tarra (UWF) Exploring the Social Impacts of the Red Snapper Individual Fishing Quota (RS-IFQ) Program: Ten Years Later MATERA, Jaime (CSUCI) Assessing the Importance of Artisanal Fisher’s Diversified Livelihoods and Trust of Marine Resource Management Institutions in Providencia and Santa Catalina, Colombia BISWAL, Rajib and JOHNSON, Derek (U Manitoba) The Socioeconomic Dynamics of the Bag Net Fishery on the West Coast of Gujarat, India: From Food Scarcity to Food Security BROWN, Lillian (Indiana U) Where Do Fish Values Come From?

(TH-08) THURSDAY 8:00-9:50 Acoma North (Inn at Loretto) Issues of Indigenous Agricultural Systems and Food Sovereignty (C&A)

CHAIR: FRENCH, Melissa (OR State U) FRENCH, Melissa (OR State U) Cosmovisions and Farming: An Investigation of Conventional and Alternative Farmers’ Environmental Values along the Willamette River. LAFFERTY, Janna (FIU) “Local Food” Assemblages in a Settler Colonial State: Coast Salish Sovereignties, Nature, and Alternative Food Politics in Western Washington DIRA, Samuel (UWF) Cultural Resilience among Chabu Forager-Farmers in Southwestern Ethiopia.

(TH-38) THURSDAY 10:00-11:50 Acoma North (Inn at Loretto) Complementary/Contradictory Directions: The Interlaced Trails of Food Entrepreneurship, Food Sovereignty and Food Revitalization Movements (C&A)

CHAIR: GREEN, Amanda (Davidson Coll) GREEN, Amanda (Davidson Coll) Indigenous Double Binds in Sámi Food Entrepreneurship and Food Sovereignty VANWINKLE, Tony (U Oklahoma) From Tanka Bars to Ted’s Montana Grill: Appropriation, Revitalization, and the Cultural Politics of the Contemporary Bison Ranching Industry COUNIHAN, Carole (Millersville U) Commerce and Food Activism: Contradictions and Challenges ELDER, Laura (St Mary’s Coll) and SAPRA, Sonalini (St Martin’s Coll) Global Palm Oil & the Corporatization of Sustainability ORLIĆ, Olga (Inst for Anth Rsch-Croatia) Stimulating Organic Farming in Croatia: Community-Supported Agriculture in Istria vs. Regional Development Rural Policies in Dubrovnik MESSER, Ellen (Tufts/BU) Cultural Politics of Food Movements

(TH-68) THURSDAY 12:00-1:20 Acoma North (Inn at Loretto) Focusing on Food Security, Sovereignty and Sustainability of Indigenous Peoples during International Responses to Rapid Climate Change in the 21st Century: Holistic Approaches by the Task Force on World Food Problems (TFWFP) (C&A)

CHAIR: KATZ, Solomon (U Penn) MENCHER, Joan P. KATZ, Solomon (U Penn) New Approaches to Improve the Sustainability and Productivity of the Food System of Indigenous Peoples

(TH-98) THURSDAY 1:30-3:20 Acoma North (Inn at Loretto) Farmer Challenges and Strategies in U.S. Agriculture (C&A)

CHAIR: GIBSON, Jane W. (KU) GIBSON, Jane W. (KU) Precision Agriculture: Dystopic Vision or Utopian Future WISE, Jennifer (Purdue U) Agriculture and Industry: Food Security and Economic Livelihoods in the Midwestern United States FURMAN, Carrie (UGA) and BARTELS, Wendylin (UF) Process and Partnerships: Enhancing Climate Change Adaptation through Meaningful Stakeholder Engagement RISSING, Andrea (Emory U) Loving the Work Isn’t Enough: New Farmers Deciding to Quit in the Midwest COLLUM, Kourtney (COA) Adaptation and Cooperation in Agriculture: On-Farm Bee Conservation in the U.S. and Canada

(TH-128) THURSDAY 3:30-5:20 Acoma North (Inn at Loretto) Off-track: Fieldwork Evidence and Foodways Theories (C&A)

CHAIRS: DE LIMA, Ana Carolina B. and BASKIN, Feray Jacky (Indiana U) DE LIMA, Ana Carolina B. (Indiana U) Family Cash Transfers in the Rural Brazilian Amazon: Consequences to Diets and Health BASKIN, Feray (IU) Integration and the Role of Traditional Food at Cultural Events: A Case Study of Turkish Women in North-Eastern France MATTERN, Lindsey (Indiana U) Maternal Work and Infant Feeding Practices in the Context of Urbanization in Tamil Nadu, India

(TH-137) THURSDAY 3:30-5:20 Rivera B (Drury) Drug, Food, Medicine: Emerging Topics in the Anthropology of Consumption, Part II

CHAIRS: LEE, Juliet P. (PIRE) and GERBER, Elaine (Montclair State U) RAJTAR, Malgorzata (Adam Mickiewicz U) Is Cornstarch the Solution?: Dietary Treatment of LCHADD Patients JEROFKE, Linda (EOU) The Culture of Food Banks: The Story of an Eastern Oregon Food Bank LEE, Juliet P., PAGANO, Anna, RECARTE, Carlos, MOORE, Roland S., and GAIDUS, Andrew (PIRE), MAIR, Stina (U Pitt) Accessing Health in the Corner Store GERBER, Elaine (Montclair State U) Disabling Markets: Barriers to Healthy Eating for Disabled People in the US DISCUSSANT: EISENBERG, Merrill (U Arizona Emeritus)

(TH-158) THURSDAY 5:30-7:20 Acoma North (Inn at Loretto) Critical Analysis of Food Security, Food Justice and the Alternative Food Movement in the U.S. (C&A)

CHAIR: ROWE, Jeff (Wayne State U) ROWE, Jeff (Wayne State U) Food Justice as Right or Conferring Its Own Agency?: Retaining the Human Contribution to Food Justice Definitions LEWIS, Asaad V. (William & Mary Coll) An Institutional Analysis of Meaning and Inequality within the Alternative Food Movement WOLF, Meredith (William & Mary Coll) Labeling “Organic”: Social Movements, Branding and Reverse Stigma in Sustainable Food Production ANDREATTA, Susan (UNCG) Lessons Learned from Creating a Community Garden on a University Campus

(F-08) FRIDAY 8:00-9:50 Acoma North (Inn at Loretto) Good Intentions and Mis(sed)alignments in Expanding Food Access: Stories of Policy, Planning, and Markets (C&A)

CHAIR: MARKOWITZ, Lisa (U Louisville) TRAPP, Micah M. (U Memphis) Troubled Access at the Farmers’ Market: Resituating Nutrition Incentives within a Framework of Distribution MARKOWITZ, Lisa, ANGAL, Neha, LEVINE, Mariah, SIZEMORE, D.A., VALENTINE, Laura, and NOLTE, Beth (U Louisville) Farmers’ Market Promotion Program: A View from a Church Parking Lot in Kentucky STANFORD, Lois (NMSU) Mobile Farmers Markets: Bringing Fresh Food to Food Deserts along the US-Mexico Border OTHS, Kathryn and GROVES, Katy M. (U Alabama) All’s Well That Ends Well: How Alabama Farmers Marketers Last ‘Stand’ against Modernity was Finally Resolved GADHOKE, Preety and BRENTON, Barrett P. (St John’s U) Defining Food Insecurity in the U.S.: How Policy Rhetoric Impedes the Delivery of Food Assistance Programs and Its Impact on Public Health Nutrition Outreach

(F-45) FRIDAY 10:00-11:50 Chaco West (Inn at Loretto) Land, Water, and Agroecology: Strategies for Surviving and Reviving

CHAIR: FAUST, Betty (CICY) PALMER, Andie (U Alberta) Indigenous Water Rights in Western Canada and Aotearoa New Zealand ANDERSON-LAZO, AL and PICCIANO, Lorette (Rural Coalition) Agroecological Knowledges and Technologies of Rural Resilience in the Age of Extraction: Food, Land, and Water Rights in Community-Driven Development

(F-65) FRIDAY 12:00-1:20 Santa Fe (La Fonda) Ethnobotany, Food, and Identity

CHAIR: FOWLER, Emily E. (UIC) FOWLER, Emily E. (UIC) Traditional Maya Medical Practices, Ethnobotany, and Western Medicine GRIFFITH, Lauren and GRIFFITH, Cameron (TTU), CHO, Juan (Ixcacao) Agree-culture as Local Ecological Knowledge GAMWELL, Adam (Brandeis U) Culinary Catalysts and Scientific Shifts: Peruvian Quinoa in the Age of Genetics and Gastronomy

(F-98) FRIDAY 1:30-3:20 Acoma North (Inn at Loretto) Examining and Assessing the Impact of Food Insecurity (C&A)

CHAIR: KIHLSTROM, Laura (USF) KIHLSTROM, Laura (USF) Leaving the Past Behind: A Cross-Cultural Case Study on Food Insecurity, Nutritional Status and Stress among Ethiopians and Finns in Florida, U.S. BRANDT, Kelsey, GONZALES, Bethany, and BRUNSON, Emily K. (TX State U) Coping with Hunger and Stigma: An Examination of Food Insecurity in Hays County, TX CRAF, Chaleigh (TX State U) Narratives and Neoliberalism LONNEMAN, Michael (UGA) From Slavery to Wage Labor: Livelihood Change and Land Use Transitions in the U.S. Piedmont, 1850–1880

(F-130) FRIDAY 3:30-5:20 Tesuque Ballroom (Inn at Loretto) Infant Feeding Inequalities in the U.S.: Interdisciplinary Research in Applied Settings

CHAIRS: MILLER, Elizabeth M. and DEUBEL, Tara F. (USF) LOUIS-JACQUES, Adetola (USF) Racial and Ethnic Disparities in U.S. Breastfeeding and Implications for Maternal and Child Health Outcomes MILLER, Elizabeth M. (USF) Food Insecurity and Breastfeeding in the United States: An Anthropological Perspective HERNANDEZ, Ivonne (USF) One Step for a Hospital, Ten Steps for Women: African American Women’s Experiences in a Newly-Accredited BabyFriendly Hospital DEUBEL, Tara F. (USF) Supporting a Culture of Breastfeeding: African American Women’s Infant Feeding Practices

(F-158) FRIDAY 5:30-6:50 Acoma North (Inn at Loretto) Methods and Strategies for Addressing Food Insecurity (C&A)

CHAIR: HINRICHSEN, Megan (Monmouth Coll) HINRICHSEN, Megan (Monmouth Coll) Food Security, Childhood Malnutrition, and Educational Opportunities in Urban Ecuador: Applying Anthropology and Interdisciplinary Student Engagement to Complex Social Problems HUANG, Sarah (Purdue U) Urban Transnational Foodscapes: Exploring Methodological Challenges and Opportunities to Engage Immigrants and Refugees in Urban Food Programs D’INGEO, Dalila, GRAVLEE, Clarence, YOUNG, Alyson, and MCCARTY, Christopher (UF) Rethinking Food Security from Adolescents’ Perspective: A Mixed Method Study in Low Income African American Neighborhoods in Tallahassee, FL COLLINS, Cyleste C. (Cleveland State U), FISCHER, Rob (CWRU), and BARRETT, Kelly (Cleveland Botanical Garden) Planting, Weeding, Marketing and Interpersonal Growth: Teens’ Experiences with Urban Farming in Cleveland, Ohio

(S-97) SATURDAY 1:30-3:20 Exchange (La Fonda) Food, Water and the Struggle for Humanity

CHAIR: SYKES, Jaime D. (USF) LEE, Ramon K. (SUNY Albany) Artistic Vision: Artivism as a Historical Process in the Struggle for Humanity MCDONALD, Fiona P. (IUPUI/IAHI) Water in the Anthropocene MUME, Bertha (Katholieke U Leuven) Water Accessibility: Challenges and Prospects in the “Livanda Congo” Community – Limbe Cameroon VEROSTICK, Kirsten A., SYKES, Jaime D., and KIMMERLE, Erin H. (USF) Archaeology of Inequality: Breaking the Tradition at the Dozier School for Boys SYKES, Jaime D., VEROSTICK, Kirsten A., and KIMMERLE, Erin H. (USF) Inequality in Archaeology: Historical and Contemporary Issues

(S-104) SATURDAY 1:30-3:20 Chaco East (Inn at Loretto) Local Food Movements: Examining Food Access in Target Communities

CHAIR: PAPAVASILIOU, Faidra (GSU) PAPAVASILIOU, Faidra (GSU) and FURMAN, Carrie (U Georgia) From Local to Regional: The Role Food Hubs Can Play in the Reconfiguration of Local Food KING, Hilary (Emory U) Ensuring Healthy Food Gets Around: The Politics of Pairing Produce and Public Transportation GOSS, Jordan E. (U Memphis) Fruits, Vegetables, and Seafood, Oh My! What Will Memphians Buy?: A Comparative Study of Shopping Habits and Food Access in Two Memphis Census Tracts BAILY, Heather (CWRU), MONTEBAN, Madalena, FREEDMAN, Darcy, WALSH, Colleen, and MATLOCK, Kristen (Prev Rsch Ctr for Healthy Neighborhoods) Elucidating Social Network Strategies to Expand the Scope of Nutrition Education

(S-134) SATURDAY 3:30-5:20 Chaco East (Inn at Loretto) The Social and Cultural Life of Foods: Examining the Cultural Complexities and Transformation of Certain Foods

Chair: MABONDZO, Wilfried (U Montreal) MABONDZO, Wilfried (U Montreal) Consumption of the “Millet” in Hadjerian’s “Country”: At the Center of Social Assistance BASU, Pratyusha (UTEP) Converting Milk from Food to Commodity: Comparing Nutrition and Income Benefits in Dairy Development Programs in Kenya VAZQUEZ, Carlos (UTEP) Jewish Food, Eating and Identity in the El Paso Region MCFARLAND HARTSGROVE, Kelly (UNT) Food Tastes

 

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Filed under anthropology, anthropology of food, applied anthropology, Food Studies

EM Thoughts and Readings!

Ellen Messer

March 17–St. Patrick’s Day fell on a Friday during Lent, when Roman Catholics ordinarily forego meat. But this year the Boston-based Roman Catholic Cardinal O’Malley gave everyone permission to eat meat–i.e., corned beef–so they could celebrate their heritage.

The unconsummated union of Unilever and Kraft-Heinz continues to generate commentary. Jack Nelson, in the Financial Times, praised Unilever’s “responsible capitalism” as contrasted with Kraft Heinz’s “red blooded cost cutters” who cut jobs and divisions with abandon, with no concern for affected workers and places. Will Hutton argues that “companies with a declared purpose perform better” (a reference to responsible capitalism as opposed to unbridled profits). Share holders, according to various sources, are of mixed opinions. Depends who you read and trust.

Avian flu has struck Tennessee farms that supply Tyson Foods. All birds within a 6 mile radius of the observed outbreak have been culled. Stay tuned. This is not the end of the story. Ask: besides the birds, who suffers the losses? You can track these and other avian flu pandemics here.

Score spuds for “The Martian.” The International Potato Center (CIP) one of the consortium of international agricultural research centers, this one based in Lima, Peru, has imitated “The Martian” (i.e., the movie’s) potato experiment on desolate Mars — this time for real in the Peruvian desert. The experiment reports promising results! The CIP experiment can also be looked at the opposite way: using Peruvian conditions to shape understandings of what might be grown on Mars under what modified conditions.

The Philippines, annoyed at the highest levels with US policy, has struck a trade deal to send agricultural (among other) products to China. Officially warming to the Chinese as a partner, the government is also scorning the US.

In keeping with new US administration policy on “America First” high level US officials push to raise US scrutiny of China food deals in the US (e.g., Chinese investments that result in takeover of US food companies).

Allegations assert that (a now retired) EPA official colluded with Monsanto to hide disease risks of glyphosate (Roundup herbicide) exposure.  Succinct summary of the issues can be accessed here. Almost simultaneously, EU official chemical assessment office gave glyphosate a pass on cancer risk, although the findings remain contentious, and no one questions findings that Roundup harms aquatic life. (See news summary here.)

What do I think? Company lobbyists are always trying to influence regulations and findings. Results of experiments designed to judge carcinogenicity, and impacts on ordinary people who use Roundup, depend on terms of exposure to the chemical and individual vulnerability.  As a result, different studies reach different conclusions with opposite safety-policy implications.  Why are these issues surfacing now?  Glyphosate’s safety evaluation is up for renewal in the US and Europe (and the world).

On another topic, leading chocolate companies have pledged to advance platforms and guidelines for sustainability; more precisely, to prevent deforestation.  Some of these companies in the past have posted confusing standards.  Note that the efforts are addressed at high levels (states, corporations) and while they voice concerns about small farmers, don’t formally integrate them into the proposed decision making for new normative practices.

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Research Methods for Anthropological Studies of Food and Nutrition! New Book Discount!

ChrzanVol3

Edited by two former SAFN presidents and containing articles by many SAFN members, the new three volume set “Research Methods for Anthropological Studies of Food and Nutrition” is finally available. Here is an announcement from Berghahn with discount codes for each volume or for the set. 

It is our pleasure to announce the recent publication  of the three volumes of our Research Methods for Anthropological Studies of Food and Nutrition series.

The series includes the following three volumes:

ChrzanResearchFOOD RESEARCH: Nutritional Anthropology and Archaeological Methods, Edited by Janet Chrzan and John Brett

FOOD CULTURE: Anthropology, Linguistics and Food Studies, Edited by Janet Chrzan and John Brett

FOOD HEALTH: Nutrition, Technology, and Public Health, Edited by Janet Chrzan and John Brett

The books are also available in a 3-volume set, which carries a 20% discount:

RESEARCH METHODS FOR ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES OF FOOD AND NUTRITION

ChrzanCultureThe Key features of these books:

A comprehensive reference for students and established scholars interested in food and nutrition research.

Focuses on areas such as Nutritional and Biological Anthropology, Archaeology, Socio-Cultural and Linguistic Anthropology, Food Studies and Applied Public Health.

These books would be suitable for courses on food and nutrition research in Nutritional and Biological Anthropology, Archaeology, Socio-Cultural and Linguistic Anthropology, Food Studies and Applied Public Health.

We encourage you to take advantage of a limited time 50% off discount offer available on our website for each title. Just enter the following codes at checkout:

ChrzanHealthCHR876 – Food Research

CHR890 Food Culture

CHR913 Food Health

If you are interested in purchasing all 3 titles in the set (the RRP for which already carries a 20% discount), we are delighted to offer an additional 50% discount if you enter the code CHR975 at checkout  

These are the initial hardback library editions; should you wish to ensure that your library include any of these titles in its collection, please find library recommendation forms for your convenience at the links above.

If you are interested in reviewing  any of these titles for a firm course adoption, please contact us at publicityUS@berghahnbooks.com or publicityUK@berghahnbooks.com for more information on pricing and student purchasing options.

For further details on this title or any other from Berghahn Books, please visit www.berghahnbooks.com.

 

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What FoodAnthropology Is Reading Now, March 7, 2017

David Beriss

A brief digest of food and nutrition-related items that caught our attention recently. Got items you think we should include? Send links and brief descriptions to dberiss@gmail.com or hunterjo@gmail.com.

Here in New Orleans, we have just finished the Carnival season and have entered into the austere period of Lent. But in the rest of the United States, people are apparently still struggling to sort out the difference between serious stuff and the Carnivalesque. Witness, first, this very serious New York Times column by Frank Bruni, which asserts that people should stop criticizing President Trump’s desire for well-done steak with ketchup. In case you think that Bruni is desperate for something to write about, it seems that concerns over the President’s steak are part of a broader cultural critique, as this article by the editor of Eater.com makes clear. I wonder if we could interest President Trump in some Gulf seafood instead of steak, at least until Easter.

Of course, at FoodAnthropology we are in no position to criticize anyone who takes food seriously. Yet we do have to wonder what we might be missing while thinking about President Trump’s well-done steak and ketchup. For instance, there is this article, by Brian Barth, that looks into the deeper ambiguities of farm labor in the United States. Why is food cheap? One major factor is that food is grown, harvested, and processed by poorly paid and deeply exploited workers. Many of them are the undocumented migrants the new administration wants to deport. Certainly, the plan to deport people seems unjust, but as this article suggests, questions of justice—about wages, working conditions, and more—are far deeper than debates about immigration status would suggest (as we have noted before here on the blog, of course).

The most recent episode of Evan Kleiman’s KCRW radio program “Good Food” is devoted to immigration issues across the food industry, including immigrant restaurants, slaughterhouses, farms, farmers markets, and more. And there are points of view from across the political spectrum as well. Get your students to listen and start a discussion.

In the context of a new administration that wants to emphasize building and buying American, should we reevaluate the food movement’s obsession with the local? Read, for instance, this fascinating article about efforts to make the food provided on University of California campuses sustainable. In this version, “sustainability” is apparently defined by being produced in California. There is quite a lot of food produced in that state, but some things, like coffee, are generally not grown there. Is it more “sustainable” to find a way to grow coffee in California? Or are there arguments for some kinds of globalization worth considering?

Where you get seated in a restaurant matters. Ruth Reichl noted this in her famous review of Le Cirque in 1993, when her experience of dining in disguise and dining as the New York Times food critic led to rather different experiences. But the politics of the dining room can be complicated by any number of factors, including race and gender, and not only in the most famous fine dining establishments. Read, for instance, this brief, but ethnographically detailed piece by Osayi Endolyn on her experiences as a hostess in various restaurants. You will never look at restaurant dining rooms innocently again.

After the recent elections, many pundits suggested that the Democrats paid insufficient attention to suffering in rural America. This dovetails with many of the critiques leveled by food activists in recent years, who argue that failing to pay attention to who produces our food—and in what kind of conditions—is a major problem. This critique is also shared by James Rebanks, an English sheep farmer, who has traveled through rural America and suggests that the industrialized model of farming is problematic at many levels. His critique is similar to the analyses documented by Susan Carol Rogers in her article about the relationship between French agriculture and the French nation.

On a related note, there are also presidential elections in France, coming up in just a few weeks. In an obligatory effort to avoid being accused of neglecting rural France, the candidates make a point of showing up for the enormous agricultural exposition in Paris. This article from NPR examines the thinking of French farmers on the upcoming election…and if you read the Rogers article we cite above, this whole thing makes complete sense.

France is often the example we turn to when we want to point out a country that has not abandoned all the good things—meat, dairy, bread—in favor of one or another fad diet. Indeed, according to one study, only 37% of French people exclude some item (like meat or gluten) from their diet, compared to 64% of people worldwide (44% in Europe, 50% in North America, 84% in Africa and the Middle East). But this is changing, according to this fascinating article from Le Monde (which is where the statistics come from). It seems that the “individualization” of the French diet has led to all manner of interesting changes in what people will eat. Perhaps one of the more interesting aspects of this article is the fact that it never addresses religion, which is what probably motivates most people around the world to avoid particular foods and an area that has been especially fraught in France in recent years. This could be a great article for discussion with your students, but it is in French.

And while we are on the topic of fad diets, food scholar Emily Contois has recently published an article about food blogs that strive to create new ideas about nutrition, related to gender, class, and ethnicity. And food porn. She has written an extended description of the article on her blog, which you should read.

Here is a nice little piece by Amanda Yee on the African-American shoe box lunch. These were lunches packed for African-Americans traveling across the U.S. prior to the Civil Rights Act, when segregation meant that dining opportunities were rare. Nicely written, with a few good photos too.

It is fitting that we end this week more or less where we started, with some musings on the literary fate of restaurant criticism, by Navneet Alang. Alang riffs off of the work of Elijah Quashie, aka the Chicken Connoisseur, a London-based critic of fast-food fried chicken shops in the UK. Quashie’s reviews, which are available on YouTube, are wonderful in and of themselves, but for Alang, they represent a pivotal moment in the history of restaurant criticism. The tension between snobby elitism and populist fried chicken echoes certain themes in recent UK and US politics. Enjoy.

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JOB – SOAS, University of London

A job search announcement that should be of interest to our readers. Note that the position is essentially at the rank of assistant professor and that food systems and food security are areas of specialization of particular interest for this position. 

The Department of Anthropology and Sociology at SOAS, University of London invites applications for a Lectureship in Anthropology tenable from September 2017.

You will be expected to convene and teach core theory and optional regional/thematic courses in social/cultural anthropology at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, to carry out and publish research of the highest quality and assume normal administrative tasks associated with a Lectureship.

Skills and experience

You must have a PhD in Social or Cultural Anthropology and a record of excellence in Anthropology research as evidenced by high quality professional publications. We are primarily seeking a candidate with teaching and research interests in anthropological theory,  methodology and history. In order to support, supplement and complement the department’s existing work, preference will be given to candidates with a specialisation in one or more of the following areas: medical anthropology/mental health, migration and diaspora, ecology/environment and/or food systems and food security. Candidates should have regional interests in any of the main areas covered by the School – Asia, Africa and the Near and Middle East. It is expected that you will have expertise relevant to the vision and strategy of the School, including a strong interest in issues of particular importance to the developing world.

Further information

Prospective applicants seeking further information may contact the Head of the Department, Dr. Kevin Latham via e-mail at: kl1@soas.ac.uk. Further information about the Department can be found at: http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/

As an employer of choice SOAS offers an extensive benefits package including:

  • 30 days holiday plus bank holidays and School closure days, pro rata for part time staff
  • Pension scheme with generous employer contribution
  • Various loan schemes including season ticket loan, IT equipment loan
  • Cycle to Work Scheme
  • Enhanced Maternity, Paternity and Adoption Pay provisions, childcare voucher scheme, financial childcare support

To apply for this vacancy or download a job description, please visit www.soas.ac.uk/jobs

Completed applications must be received by 23:59 on 4th April 2017 to be considered.

Interviews will provisionally be held in the week commencing 1st May 2017. 

If you have any questions or require any assistance with regard to the application process, please contact hr-recruitment@soas.ac.uk .

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