Winners of SAFN’s 2nd Annual Anthropology Day Photo Contest!

David Beriss

We are ready to reveal the winners of this year’s SAFN Anthropology Day photo contest!

The weighty decision was reached by a panel made up of SAFN officers, including Jennifer Jo Thompson, Scott Alves Barton, Joan Gross and me. I want to thank the committee for their work and their patience. Our criteria this year were the same as last year. Photos were judged for

  • the ethnographic nature of the pictures, overall.
  • the contribution of the photo as insight into foodways.
  • the extent to which the photos help us see the work and lives of people in food.
  • the overall composition, originality, etc.

In addition, to win, entrants need to be current members of SAFN. Just to be ready to participate next year, consider joining by clicking here.

We had many excellent submissions this year. We are both grateful to those who submitted and very impressed by the photographic eyes of food anthropologists. SVA, watch out!

The overall winner of the 2022 SAFN Anthropology Day Photo Contest is B. Lynne Milgram, of OCAD University in Toronto, Canada. The judges were impressed by the balance in the photos, and the textured invocation of life in the market. In addition to appearing here, some of these photographs appear in

Milgram, B. Lynne and Lorelei C. Mendoza. 2021. Repositioning the Edge: The Resilience of a Wholesale Vegetable Market in Benguet, Northern Philippines. In Norms and Illegality: Intimate Ethnographies and Politics. Cristiana Panella and Walter E. Little, eds., 137-159. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books. 

La Trinidad Vegetable Trading Post.
This wholesale vegetable market is the major national hub for the wholesale trade of upland temperature climate vegetables (e.g., broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, potatoes).
Photo by B. Lynne Milgram: 2018. La Trinidad, Benguet Province, Philippines.
La Trinidad Vegetable Trading Post.
Traders buy and sell upland vegetables at this major national hub for the wholesale trade of upland temperature climate vegetables (e.g., broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, potatoes). 
Photo by B. Lynne Milgram: 2018. La Trinidad, Benguet Province, Philippines.
La Trinidad Vegetable Trading Post
Cauliflower heads wrapped in newspaper for safe shipping. 
Photo by B. Lynne Milgram: 2018. La Trinidad, Benguet Province, Philippines.
A public market vendor sells locally specific cooked rice cakes. 
Photo by B. Lynne Milgram: 2018. Baguio City, Benguet Province, Philippines.

Second place goes to Andrea Sanchez-Castaneda, a Ph.D. Candidate at the Global and Sociocultural Studies Department–Anthropology track, at Florida International University. The photos were remarkable for their lush colors, but also for the way they illustrated the interactions between people and gardens.

Andrea provides an overall comment for the photos below:

The pictures I submit for the contest are part of my dissertation fieldwork research with the urban Muisca indigenous community of Suba, in Bogota, Colombia. These three pictures show the relationship between a group of indigenous women in the city and their gardens. These gardens have served as vital places of territorial resistance, food sovereignty, gender empowerment, and cultural revitalization. In the Muisca community, urban gardens belong to women that have either inherited land from their families or reclaimed land through occupation. These women have challenged the ongoing colonial race violence by enduring relationships with the land and their ancestors through the everyday care of their gardens. 

Photo by Andrea Sanchez-Castaneda, October 2021. Reproduced with permission
Photo by Andrea Sanchez-Castaneda, October 2021. Reproduced with permission
Photo by Andrea Sanchez-Castaneda, October 2021. Reproduced with permission

Bethe Hagens, of Walden University, comes in third, with this remarkable and somewhat mind bending image of eggs cooking on a solar oven.

In October (in Maine), we gathered some of the neighbors together on the driveway as “solar cooks” and offered free totally solar breakfasts to passersby to show how fast and efficiently we could turn out delicious eggs, biscuits, and sausage. Photo by Bethe Hagens.

Finally, we had a runner-up this year whose photos deserve honorable mention. Inayat Ali, Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Fatima Jinnah Women University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, and a Research Fellow in the Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology at the University of Vienna, submitted these photos from his ethnographic fieldwork in Pakistan in 2014, and 2021. His work can be found here: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1659-8492

Niaz–the sacred meal prepared by rice, chicken and a lot of spices in a small village of Pakistan’s Sindh Province in 2021. Photo by Inayat Ali
Preparing sacred meal called Niaz in a small village of Sindh Province-Pakistan. This is a common way to prepare communal meals in 2021. Photo by Inayat Ali.
Preserving water-Local people of a village in Pakistan’s Thar Desert putting water in a small water-tank in the premises of their household. Photo by Inayat Ali.
Food as medicine-Camel herder, Jatt people, are selling camel milk in Islamabad to treat various disease such as diabetes and hepatitis. Photo by Inayat Ali.
Food insecure-These boys are selling seedpods obtained from local trees in Pakistan’s Thar Deseret in 2014 when malnutrition significantly affected that region. Photo by Inayat Ali.

I want to thank everyone for participating in this year’s competition. I would encourage the winners and, frankly, even participants who we have not mentioned here, to consider writing for the blog, perhaps in a way that further explains what is in your pictures. And we will hopefully do this again next year! Celebrate anthropology!

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