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Happy New Year!

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The Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition

wishes you a happy new year.

May your 2016 be full of joy and delicious!

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Food Studies Post-Doctoral Position – NYU

The Department of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health at NYU invites
applications from outstanding candidates for a full-time Postdoctoral
Research Fellowship. The position is within the Food Studies Program. It is
available for one year, with the possibility of renewal for one additional
year (contingent on availability of funding). Candidates must have received
a PhD within the last five years, with potential for outstanding research
in an area aligned with the department’s work as specified below:

*GOALS and SUBJECT AREAS*
1. Advance the field of Food Studies
▪ expand the boundaries of the field
▪ demonstrate the importance of Food Studies for other
disciplines
▪ advance the profile of Food Studies within NYU
▪ strengthen networks with other Food Studies or relevant
departments elsewhere

2. Emphasis will be placed on the cultural elements of Food Studies
▪ historical, modern and critical cultural, sociological, geographical, and
anthropological approaches will be prioritized
3. While not a requirement, selection will reward candidates whose work
addresses local-global connections, particularly in urban centers
▪ boundary crossing and exchange (intra and inter-ethnic,
international, etc.)
▪ global circulations of people, ideas, and products
▪ city geographies, demographics, and food environments

4. Particular attention will be paid to candidates whose work merges
aesthetic/cultural and economic/material dimensions
▪ and projects that engage seriously with taste, pleasure, and identity
alongside issues of regulation, transportation, commercialization, or other
biophysical aspects of food production and consumption
· candidates who can show competency in using mapping software and have
affinity for the digital humanities (e.g. in CartoDB, Omeka, etc.)

*FELLOWSHIP RESPONSBILITIES*

Fellows will be expected to:
▪ Continue research and expand their contribution to the field of Food
Studies while at NYU
-publish in appropriate academic journals
-present in appropriate academic conferences
▪ Play an active role in the Program, Department, broader NYU and Food
Studies community
-present their research formally at least once during the year (ideally
once per semester, in different formats and with different audiences)
-attend and participate regularly in relevant talks within the department
and beyond
-nurture relationships with students and faculty
▪ Teach one or two courses in a year (to be determined in discussion with
the Chair and the Program Director)
▪ Support the program for relevant initiatives (such as grant writing,
aiding in partnership development and organizing colloquia).

Applicants must send: 1) CV (2-pages maximum), 2) three reference letters
(to be sent directly to krishnendu.ray@nyu.edu and pvs1@nyu.edu), 3) a
statement (2 pages) describing a one-year research plan.

The application package should be sent to pvs1@nyu.edu and
krishnendu.ray@nyu.edu (electronic submission of one complete PDF file is
required). The deadline for submission is February 15th 2016. If the
search is successful the term will begin September 2016.

New York University is an Equal Opportunity Employer. New York University
is committed to a policy of equal treatment and opportunity in every aspect
of its hiring and promotion process without regard to race, color, creed,
religion, sex, pregnancy or childbirth (or related medical condition),
sexual orientation, partnership status, gender and/or gender identity or
expression, marital or parental status, national origin,
ethnicity, alienage or citizenship status, veteran or military status, age,
disability, predisposing genetic characteristics, domestic violence victim
status, unemployment status, or any other legally protected basis. Women,
racial and ethnic minorities, persons of minority sexual orientation or
gender identity, individuals with disabilities, and veterans are encouraged
to apply for vacant positions at all levels.

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Romanian shepherds at the baracades

shepherd

Shepherds protesting in Bucharest. Photo EPA.

Everyone once in a while I read a news headline that makes me do a double take: “Romanian riot police fire tear gas at protesting shepherds” caught my attention in the December 15 issue of the British newspaper the Guardian. What is going on in Romania and why are shepherds, generally not a highly politicized group, being teargassed in Bucharest?

Over a thousand angry sheep herders gathered outside the parliament building in the Romanian capital to protest a new law limiting the number of sheep dogs they can use and forbidding the grazing of sheep during the winter. Politicians argued that Carpathian sheep dogs kill deer and wild boars, favorite animals among hunters, and that grazing sheep in the winter is not environmentally sustainable.

This new law was proposed by a group supporting hunting, an elite pass time that the former communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu made popular. Hunting in Romania still retains its association with aristocracy and privilege. In contrast, sheep farming is a central agricultural activity and an important part of many local economies in rural areas. There are an estimated 10 million sheep and 1.5 million goats in rural Romania.

Images of shepherds in their wooly capes standing in front of the capital building initially made me think that this was a story about conflicts between tradition and modernity, and resistance to a changing way of life in rural areas à la Slow Food. However, there is little that is modern here. What was at stake were two age-old conflicting uses of land–pastoralism and hunting. This riot reveals the imposition of power on the part of elites to protect their interests and the rural population’s pushback.

What is truly incredible is the political response of shepherds and the success of their protest. Some traveled more than 300 miles to join the protest in Bucharest. Although the protest turned ugly as riot police teargassed the angry sheep herders who were rushing the barricades, the outcome was that the government temporarily lifted the bans and promised to find a permanent solution. While being interviewed on camera, one shepherd defends his right to graze his sheep on the land he owns. Another shepherd munching on a sausage, holds up a piece of cheese and declares the deliciousness of their cheese. Perhaps the cornerstone of this defense lies with taste.

 

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SAFN at the 2015 AAA Meeting in Denver

Rachel Black
SAFN President
Connecticut College

It was a busy and productive AAA Meeting for the Society for the the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition. Our section sponsored 13 panels, which included one poster session and a session of the AAA Task Force on World Food Problems. SAFN was able to sponsor three invited sessions, which brought together research interests in nutrition, culture and food justice. The SAFN panels that I sat in on were well attended. It is great to see continued interest in the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition. However, our program chairs Arianna Huhn and Joan Gross found 197 people presenting on food-related topics who were not members of SAFN. This made me realize that we still have a lot of work to do to recruit new members and expand our community of scholars working in the field of Anthropology of Food and Nutrition.

During the meeting of the SAFN Executive Board, we talked about ways to attract new members and bring value to our existing membership. Next year we will be working on a creative membership drive which will include prizes for existing and new members. In addition, we will be working hard to build our community at the AAA meeting and throughout the year at events such as the Association for the Study of Food and Society meeting in Toronto that we will be co-sponsoring.

In Denver, SAFN members discussed ways to support our graduate students working on topics in the anthropology of food and nutrition. First, the Executive Board unanimously voted to cut the price of student membership in half. It now only costs $10 for students to join SAFN. Second, we plan on organizing a mentoring roundtable event with senior scholars, early-career scholars and graduate students. Third, our section will be creating a new prize to support student travel for research. Stay tuned for more details on the SAFN Student Travel Prize.

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Amy Trubek, SAFN VP, with Ji Yea Hong, the winner of this year’s Wilson Award.

This year SAFN awarded two student prizes. The Christine Wilson Award went to Ji Yea Hong for her paper entitled “”I Eat (Pork) Therefore I am (Na): Flexible Personhood and Wild Identity on One Plate”. Ji Yea Hong is a MA student in Social Sciences at the University of Chicago. Hong’s paper:

“examines ways in which ritualized production and consumption of food make people who they are by establishing ontological personhood and ethnic identity. Botshasi, salted-and-dried-pork consumed daily by the Na persons in Southwest China, is ritually produced during the annual ancestral ritual, bokhosibu. On the one hand, throughout the ritualized process of making, eating, and exchanging botshasi, the distances among humans, ancestors, and pigs are constantly negotiated, contingently establishing a flexible human personhood. On the other hand, a similar process also renders individual identity, experienced as equally contingent and flexible. This fluidity of identity gives the Na persons a political wildness that cannot be institutionalized by the state.”

This year’s Thomas Marchione Food-as-a-Human-Right Student Award went to Jessie Mazar, a student in the University of Vermont’s Master of Science in Food Systems. Mazar’s research focuses on issues of food access and food security for Latino/a migrant farm workers in Vermont’s dairy industry. The jury felt that Mazar’s work was very much in the spirit of Tom Marchione’s lifelong commitment to studying food as a human right.

The SAFN reception at the AAA meeting featured a fabulous spread that ranged from fondu to bison sliders–perfect for a chilly November evening in Denver. Between bites and sips, SAFN members enjoyed catching up with old friends and meeting new colleagues. Our SAFN former president and Colorado native John Brett gave an animated talk entitled “Driven By Justice: Food Work in Denver”. For those of us who had spent the past four days in the Denver Convention Center, Brett’s talk was a wonderful glimpse of the outside world, focusing on some of the most dynamic local food justice initiatives taking place in the city.

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SAFN Panels and Events at the 2015 AAA Meeting in Denver

This is a listing of food-related panels, papers, posters, & events at the Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association, 2015 (Denver, CO)


Current & Future SAFN Members are Invited to Attend the

SAFN RECEPTION, BUSINESS MEETING & DISTIGUISHED LECTURE

Saturday, 21 November 2015, 7:45-10:30pm

Hyatt Regency, Centennial B

Distinguished Lecture by John Brett, University of Colorado Denver

“Driven By Justice: Food Work in Denver”

John Brett

light fare will be served + cash bar available


SAFN-Sponsored Panels, Posters & Events

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY


Additional Events, Panels & Papers / Posters (Click on titles to see scheduling information)

WEDNESAY

 THURSDAY

 FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Want to be included on our listing next year? Send Paper Info to Joan Gross, SAFN Programs Co-Chair at
jgross (at) oregonstate (dot)edu

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SAFN at the 2015 Association for the Study of Food and Society Conference

asfs-conference-2015

Once again SAFN is co-sponsoring the Association for the Study of Food and Society meeting, which will be held this year in Pittsburgh from June 24-28. More details about the conference are available here on the conference web site.

Many members of SAFN will be presenting their research at the conference. The following is list of SAFN member papers and panels:

Thursday, 1:30 – 2:45

C7. PANEL Contextualizing Farming and Food Security
Buhl Beckwith
Hayden Kantor, Cornell University
Growing Ambivalence: Shifting Cropping Strategies for Staple Crops in Bihar, India


Thursday, 1:30-2:45, Mellon Devore Room

C5 PANEL: Breaking Barriers, Building Bridges: Discussing Alternatives to the Academy for Scholars and Career Seekers in Food and Nutrition

Organizers: Leigh Bush, Indiana University; Maria Carabello, University of Vermont; Madeleine Chera, Indiana University; Elyzabeth Engle, Penn State University; Emily Stengel, University of Vermont
Participants: Elyzabeth Engle, Penn State University (Chair); Dara Bloom, North Carolina State; Jenifer Buckley, Organic Processing Institute; Greg Hall, Virtue Cider; Lucy Norris, Puget Sound Food Hub/Northwest Agriculture Business Center; Marisol Pierce-Quinonez, World Bank; Leslie Pillen, Penn State University; Dawn Plummer, Pittsburgh Food Policy Council

Abstract: Graduate school is an essential part of preparing for many careers in fields related to interdisciplinary agricultural and food studies. And while years are spent on building critical knowledge and skills to prepare students for employment post-graduation, how does one actually apply that learning to work, especially work that is outside of the academy or explicitly extends beyond it? How do we negotiate partner or employer demands for quantifiable outcomes, quick application, and more, in light of our commitments to ethical and thorough research and our experiences with different approaches and timelines? How do we translate our training into effective work that makes a “real world” impact but also reflects the scholarly rigor, values, and best practices of the academy?

As a follow-up to last year’s career-path panel for graduate students, this session aims to continue the conversation about jobs that utilize the engaged research skills graduate students in food and agriculture can offer to companies, non-profits, non-governmental agencies, and communities. This panel discussion aims to create a space in which graduate students can interact with a panel of early- and mid-career professionals, with the objective of profiling career trajectories and documenting important considerations for students with advanced degrees in agrifood-related studies who are interested in finding work beyond academia. The panel will reflect the interdisciplinary and diverse nature of agrifood careers, representing a variety of sectors, including businesses, research centers, non-profits, and governmental agencies. The panelists will discuss focus questions about balancing multiple interests and approaches in their work, and reflect on specific job experiences and the lessons gleaned from them. Then the audience will be encouraged to share questions and comments with participants.

This panel will be of great interest to graduate students or recent graduates, but also to other members at any stage of their careers, especially those advising undergraduate or graduate students, those considering new opportunities for themselves, or those struggling with the task of translating their training into their work.


Thursday, 2:45-4:00, JMK Library LCC2

D10 PANEL: Bridging Culture and Change

Madeline Chera, Indiana University
Between Meals and Meanings: Notes on Snack Culture in South India
Christine Knight, University of Edinburgh:
Changing cultural representations of the Scottish diet, c.1950-2014
Habiba Boumlik, LaGuardia Community College:
Traditional Cuisine-Modern Revisited Cuisine via Food Networks and social media. The case of Chumicha in Morocco


Friday, 10:15 – 11:30

F8 PANEL: Sensing Food: Taste, Place, Memory, Power

Carole Counihan, Millersville University:
Gustatory Activism in Sardinia: Taste and the Political Power of Food
Beth Forrest, Culinary Institute of America:
I Sensed this Tasted like Hell: The Role of Food, the Senses, and Identity in the Nineteenth Century
Lisa Heldke, Gustavus Adolphus College:
My Dead Father’s Raspberry Patch, My Dead Mother’s Piecrust: Understanding Memory as Sense
Deirdre Murphy, Culinary Institute of America:
Sugar Bush: Maple syrup and the Solitude of labor in the Industrial Age


Friday, 1:00 – 2:15 – JMK Library 103

G1. PANEL Intoxicants: Pleasure, Nutrition, Aesthetics Organizer: Kima Cargill, University of Washington
Kima Cargill, University of Washington
Sugar is Toxic, But is It Intoxicating?
Janet Chrzan, University of Pennsylvania
Alcohol: Drug or Food?
Sierra Clark, New York University:
The Problem of Pleasure: Intoxication and the Evaluation of Alcohol


Friday, 1:00-2:15 – Coolidge Sanger

G6. PANEL: What makes “food work” sustainable – values, representations, and images in contemporary foodscapes
Organizer: Carole Biewener, Simmons College
Carole Biewener, Simmons College:
“Good Food” and “Good Jobs”? Does Boston’s local food movement address “sustainability” and “justice” for food system workers?
Tara Agrawal Pedulla, Carrie Freshour, Cornell University:
Serving Up the Public Plate: Food work and workers in the public sector
Kimberly E. Johnson, Syracuse University
Contemplating myths, invisibility, and the value of food work on multiple levels
Penny Van Esterik, York University:
Breastfeeding as Foodwork


Saturday, 10:15-11:30, Dilworth 100

K8. PANEL: The Cultural Economy of Food in Place
David Beriss, University of New Orleans:
Tacos, Kale, and Vietnamese Po’Boys: The Re-Creolization of Food in Postdiluvian New Orleans
Gianna Fazioli, Chatham University:
The Ecological and Culture Effect of Development on Isaan Thai Food
Liora Gvion, Hebrew University
“I would expect from a Palestinian cook to…..”: Master Chef Israel, National Narratives and the Politics Embedded in Cooking


Saturday, 1:00 – 2:15, Dilworth 006

Panel L 9, Countering Globalization: The Protection and Representation of an Indigenous Food Fare in East Asia
Chair: Stephanie Assman, Hokkaido University
Organizer: Jakob Klein, University of London
Presentations: Stephanie Assman (Hokkaido University), The Return to a Culinary Heritage: The Food Education Campaign in Japan
Greg de St. Maurice (University of Pittsburgh), Kyoto Cuisine Gone Global
Lanlan Kuang (University of Central Florida), “People’s Food” : The Aesthetic of Chinese Food in Chinese Media in the case of a Bite of China and The Taste of China

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Postdoctoral Fellowships in Food Studies

The Culinaria Research Project at the University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC) invites applications for two postdoctoral fellowships in the field of Food Studies, to work directly with the range of faculty at UTSC working in food studies. These fellowships are open to scholars who have completed a Ph.D. in Food Studies or any related field in the humanities and social sciences, by the time of appointment and within the last five years. The appointments will be for one year, starting in the summer of 2015. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. The fellowships are renewable for up to two years contingent on performance. Additional details about the position are offered below, and information about the Culinaria Research Centre can be found at: https://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/digitalscholarship/culinaria/

Position 1 – We seek applicants with primary research experience in one or more of the following areas: urban food security; food and diaspora; urban food activism; food and urban livelihoods/labour; and urban agriculture.

Position 2 – We seek applicants with primary research experience in either or both of: food and sensory experience; and/or critical approaches to nutrition discourses and practices. This position will appeal to emerging scholars with a background in Science and Technology Studies or other humanistic or social science approaches to diet, nutrition, and foodways.

Fellows will interact with faculty, graduate students, undergraduates, and food professionals across a wide range of disciplines. They will also be associated with the Connaught Cross-Disciplinary/Cross-Cultural Seminar “City Food: Lessons from People on the Move” and the Culinaria Research Project (https://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/digitalscholarship/culinaria/). This on-going research collaboration introduces the concept of ‘city food’ to examine the cultural, economic, and nutritional significance of food in diverse cities. Through collaborations between academic and non-academic partners, the seminar promotes transnational research on the politics, poetics, and economics of food in civic life in the past and present. In addition to engaging in collaborative and independent research, fellows will assist in planning and administering the seminar, and other events through the duration of the fellowships. Fellows will also have the opportunity to co-edit a book and a digital project on seminar themes.

Fellows are expected to be in residence at UTSC for both academic years and will be able to conduct research at the University of Toronto libraries and the Culinaria Kitchen Laboratory. UTSC, located in the richly diverse eastern end of the Greater Toronto Area, is part of the tricampus University of Toronto.

Applications should be submitted by 15 March 2015, but review of applications will begin immediately. Applications should include: 1) a cover letter; 2) a curriculum vitae 3) three letters of reference from supervisors or professors sent separately; (3) a writing sample; and 4) a statement of current and future research interests that explains how their research contributes to the goals of the City Food project. Applications, including letters of reference, should be submitted to culinaria@utsc.utoronto.ca. Questions regarding the positions should be directed to Jeffrey Pilcher (jeffrey.pilcher@utoronto.ca) or Daniel Bender (debender@usc.utoronto.ca).

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply. However, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

Employment as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Toronto is covered by the terms of the CUPE 3902 Unit 5 Collective Agreement.

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